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Is it possible in Java to invoke an overridable method in such a way that it always executes the "locally defined" version rather than an overridden version from a subclass? I.e. is there an analog to super that refers to this class, rather than the super class?

Let me give a code example to hopefully make it clear what I'm trying to do:

class A {
    void foo() {
        System.out.println("Foo from A");
    }

    void bar() {
        foo();  // <-- This is the important line!
    }
}

class B extends A {
    @Override
    void foo() {
        System.out.println("Foo from B");
    }
}

If I do new B().bar(), it will call the bar() method defined in A, which calls foo() as overridden in B to print "Foo from B".

Is there a way that I can force the bar() method to call the foo() method as defined in A rather than B? Just like I can use super.foo() in B to call the foo() method as defined in A? Unfortunately using this.foo() still calls the version of the subclass. Even something like ((A) this).foo() or A.this.foo() doesn't work.

Clearly, I could simply define a private or final version of foo() in A and call that instead. But I am hoping for a solution, where all I do is change the "important line" in the code sample above to a different way of invoking foo() to have it print "Foo from A", preferably without some trick like reflection.

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Which foo() is called is determined by the type of the value (the instance), not by the type of the variable, i. e. A a = new B(); a.foo(); calls B.foo(). –  nalply Nov 15 '12 at 17:35
1  
It looks like you found one of the (many) problems of inheritance. You would do well to use composition instead of inheritance, this will produce a code that's a lot easier to read, understand and figure out what it's doing. –  Guillaume Nov 15 '12 at 17:43
    
@Guillaume I'm surprised this doesn't come up often enough to have been solved. I'm thinking for example of all the base-type classes like OutputStream that provide fallback method implementations like write(byte[] b) by forwarding them to write(int b). If you overwrite both, you can't use super any more to make use of the fallback. –  Markus A. Nov 15 '12 at 17:56
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8 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Either make your methods static (baadddddd), either change your design.

Indeed, it makes no sense to provide the default behavior for a subclass that it is defined to adapt itself to the concerned method.

As your foo() method seems to vary, you may implement a Strategy Pattern like this:

interface BarProcess{
    void foo();
}

public class DefaultBarProcess implements BarProcess{
    void foo() {
       System.out.println("Foo from A");
    }
}

public class AnotherBarProcess implements BarProcess{
    void foo() {
       System.out.println("Foo from B");
    }
}

class A {

    private BarProcess barProcess;

    public A(Bar barProcess){
      this.barProcess = barProcess;
    }

    void bar() {
        barProcess.foo();
    }
}

class B extends A {  //deprecated! No need to exist

}
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foo() always invokes instance method of the class used in new ... statement.

In short I think that the answer to your question is NO, it can't be done. It would prevent you from overriding parts of behaviour completely.

class A {

method1() {
...
method2();
...
}

class B extends A {

// You can override method2 here to change the behaviour of method1 
// because it will call **your** version of method2
// You **don't** have to override method1 to achieve that

method2() {
...
}

}
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As far as I know, a B object will always call its own foo() method. With that said, B.foo() can be defined to call the superclass' foo() method. For example, you could define B as follows:

class B extends A {
    @Override public void foo() {
        super.foo();
    }
}

And doing so will have B call foo from A. But doing so will have it always do so.

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It's strange to me that Java offers 'super' but no analog for 'me' or 'here' or 'local' or 'this' or something the like... –  Markus A. Nov 15 '12 at 17:42
    
Java has a this keyword... –  Whymarrh Nov 15 '12 at 17:43
    
Yes but "this" means this object, not this class... So if the object is a B, this will actually call a method on B (even though it's called from A) –  Guillaume Nov 15 '12 at 17:44
    
@Markus It's best to imagine inheritance as B literally copying all the methods from A. That way, when bar() calls foo() it's going to refer to its own foo() unless otherwise specified. –  Whymarrh Nov 15 '12 at 17:46
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There is this Rule of Thumb:

In Inheritance the most specific version of the method for that class is called.

- So it will be always the foo() method of Class B that will be called, if its called on an instance of B.

- Still if you want the foo() method of Class A to be called using your above mentioned code then you will need the super keyword.

Eg:

class B extends A {
    @Override
    void foo() {

       super.foo();
    }
}
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Your object is a B. It isn't an A! Here's an example:

public class Apple {
    public void printColor() {
        System.out.println("I am red");
    }

    public void bar() {
       printColor();
    }
}

Then the subclass:

public class GrannySmithApple extends Apple {
    public void printColor() {
        System.out.println("I am green");
    }
}

GrannySmithApples are green, always (unless they are rotten, but that's a whole other can of bananas)! Once you have a GrannySmithApple, it's not an Apple anymore, except in the sense that you can do all the same things with it that you could a regular Apple (printColor, eat, etc.) Make sense? And anything that hasn't changed between the conversion from regular Apple to GrannySmithApple is obviously still the same.

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this references "this object", not "this class".

That means if you have an object B that extends A, when it executes a method in the superclass A that mentions this, it will actually point to the instance of B, so will execute the method on B.

You can think of the method in A as a default method. If the method is overridden in your actual object B, then it will always be called instead.

I suggest you change your design and use composition instead of inheritance: that would ensure a clear separation of concern, and make your code a lot easier to understand and test.

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As others have stated there is no direct way to do it but you might consider a variant of this construct:

  void bar() {
    ClassA self = new ClassA();
    self.foo();  // <-- This is the important line!
  }
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Unfortunately that way foo() would loose access to all local variables. But "self" would be a great keyword to use for this scenario! :) –  Markus A. Nov 15 '12 at 17:53
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You can have an "internal" foo() in A that is called.

class A {
    private void fooInternal() {
        System.out.println("Foo from A");
    }

    void foo() {
        fooInternal();
    }

    void bar() {
        fooInternal();
    }
}

class B extends A {
    @Override
    void foo() {
        System.out.println("Foo from B");
    }
}

new B().bar() will now print "Foo from A" while new B().foo() will print "Foo from B".

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@Mik378 Can you explain how the overridden method would be called if calling new B().bar(). –  maba Nov 15 '12 at 18:09
    
That'll work. That's what I meant in the beginning of the last paragraph of my question as a possible, but not so elegant solution. –  Markus A. Nov 15 '12 at 18:45
    
What do you think will work here? The method that IS overridden in subclass will still be called if you invoke it from subclass object. You don't achieve anything with this construct –  Germann Arlington Nov 16 '12 at 9:21
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