Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a file with records having timestamp fields that include GMT offset. I want to use the sed command to replace the value on the record to a regular timestamp (without GMT offset).

For example:

`$date -d '2012/11/01 00:50:22 -0800' '+%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'`

returns this value which is what I am looking to do:

2012-11-01 01:50:22

Except I want to perform that operation on every line of this file and apply the date command to the timestamp value. Here is a sample record:

"SB","6GV96644X48128125","","","","T0006",2012/10/03 13:08:43 -0700,"NJ"

Here is my code:

head -1 myfile | sed 's/,[0-9: /\-]\{25\},/,'"`date -d \1 '+%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'`"',/

which doesn't work: it just ignores \1 and replaces the matched pattern with today's date:

"SB","6GV96644X48128125","","","","T0006",2012-11-14 01:00:00,"NJ"

I hoped that \1 would result in the matched patterns be passed to the date function and return a regular timestamp value (as in the example I provided above showing how the date functions applies the GMT offset and returns a regular stimestamp string) and would replace the old value on the record.

share|improve this question
    
"Just replaces the matched pattern ..." . that means it isn't matching your reg exp. Good luck. –  shellter Nov 15 '12 at 17:53
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would use awk instead. For example:

awk '{cmd="date -d \""$7"\" \"+%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S\"";
    cmd | getline k; $7=k; print}' FS=, OFS=, myFile

This will replace the 7th field with the results of running the date command on the original contents of the 7th field.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks sooo much. One problem that I hope you can help me with: it seems that it doesn't recognize the "" as a field in the record. some fields may have null value ("") on some records. Is there any way to tell it to use "," as a field delim so that it will pick the right value for $7: "SB","6GV96644X48128125","","","","T0006",2012/10/03 13:08:43 -0700,"NJ" really appreciate your help –  FZF Nov 15 '12 at 18:25
    
With FS=,, the fields will be determined by the commas. "" should not be treated specially. –  William Pursell Nov 15 '12 at 18:28
    
sorry I had left out the FS=,. It works and it changes the date. However, it took all the commas out! the resulting record had no , as field separator. Anyway to get around that? Also, is it possible to make the $7 (the field#) a shell variable? would replace $7 with ${datefldnum} do the trick? Thanks for your help –  FZF Nov 15 '12 at 18:57
    
You need to add OFS=, to keep the commas. My apologies for omitting that from the answer. Edited. –  William Pursell Nov 15 '12 at 20:01
    
It works beautifully! Thanks soooooooooo much. Really appreciate all your help and your follow up answers. –  FZF Nov 15 '12 at 20:19
add comment

In sed:

head -1 datefile |
  sed '
    # handle % in input correctly
    s/%/%%/g
    # execute date(1) command
    s/\(.*,\)\([0-9: /\-]\{25\}\)\(,.*\)/'"date -d '\2' '+\1%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S\3'"'/e'
  '
share|improve this answer
add comment

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r 's/^(([^,]*,){6})([^,]*)(.*)/printf "%s%s%s" '\''\1'\'' $(date -d '\''\3'\'' '\''+%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'\'') '\''\4'\''/e;q' file
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.