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Fastest way to find the number of lines in a text (C++)

I have a file with more than 400.000 rows. I give the file name as the input at my command line. After taking the file name into a variable I am trying to find the size of the file using size function. My code is as below. But the below code gives me wrong output. Please let me know where am I going wrong.

string input;

// vector<string> stringList;

cout << "Enter the file name :" <<endl;
cin >> input;//fileName;

TempNumOne = input.size();
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1  
You're going wrong by not actually opening the file! –  Rook Nov 15 '12 at 17:43
    
I know it is considered bad form to leave RTFM type responses on SO, but the correct way to do this is easily found by searching. This SO answer gives one possibility, though perhaps a more complex one than you really needed. –  Rook Nov 15 '12 at 17:47
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marked as duplicate by moooeeeep, Bo Persson, Kerrek SB, ArtemStorozhuk, Graviton Nov 16 '12 at 1:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's the standard idiom:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::string filename;

    if (!(std::cout << "Enter filename: " &&
          std::getline(std::cin, filename)))
    {
        std::cerr << "Unexpected input error!\n";
        return 0;
    }

    std::ifstream infile(filename.c_str());    // only "filename" in C++11

    if (!infile)
    {
        std::cerr << "File '" << filename << "' could not be opened!\n";
        return 0;
    }

    infile.seekg(0, std::ios::end);
    std::size_t fs = infile.tellg();
    infile.seekg(0, std::ios::beg);

    std::size_t count = 0;
    for (std::string line; std::getline(infile, line); ++count) { }

    std::cout << "File size: " << fs << ". Number of lines: " << count << ".\n";
}

If you're willing to use platform-specific code (like Posix), you can use directory inquiry functions such as lstat to read information about a file without actually opening the file.

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Hi I need to get the number of rows inside the file.Not the physical size. –  SOaddict Nov 15 '12 at 18:11
    
@SOaddict: Do a getline counting loop! –  Kerrek SB Nov 15 '12 at 18:18
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Using input.size(), you retreview the size of the input string.

You have to open the file and use seek if you want to get the file's size. See this question for more informations.

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As Rook said, you need to open a file before you can look at its contents. Right now, when you call input.size() it will give you the length of the file name.

Here is a simple way of doing what you wanted:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
//get file name (use C string instead of C++ string)
char fileName [1000];
cout << "Enter the file name :" << endl;
cin.getline(fileName, 1000); // this can hendle file names with spaces in them

// open file
ifstream is;
is.open(fileName);

// get length of file
int length;
is.seekg (0, ios::end);
length = is.tellg();

cout << fileName << "'s size is " << length << endl;

return 0;
}
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1  
That will give you the number of bytes in the file, not the number of rows. –  Bo Persson Nov 15 '12 at 18:17
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Code:

#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main() 
{ 
    int Rows = 0;
    std::string line;
    std::string filename;

    std::cout << "Enter file> ";
    std::cin>>filename;
    std::fstream infile( filename.c_str() );

    while (std::getline(infile, line))    ++Rows;
    std::cout << "" << Rows<<" rows in the file\n\n";

    return 0;
}
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I always feel a bit icky when unused variables leak into the ambient scope liek your line... –  Kerrek SB Nov 15 '12 at 19:25
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