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I have this C function:

double f(int x)
{
    if (x <= 0)
        return 0.0;
    else
        return x * log(x);
}

which I am calling in a tight loop, and would like to get rid of the branch to see if it improves performance.

I cannot use this:

double f(int x)
{
    return x * log(x);
}

because it returns NaN when x == 0 (which is true about 25% of the time.)

Is there another way to implement it so that it returns 0 when x == 0, but still get rid of the branch?

(I am less concerned about negative inputs, because these are errors, whereas zeros are not.)

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?: is also branching but if you want to get rid of if-else then you can use it –  Omkant Nov 15 '12 at 17:55
1  
Well, you do have a piecewise function. It's hard to imagine how to evaluate it without a condition on the pieces. But check your assembly, which may replace the branch by a conditional-move anyway. –  Kerrek SB Nov 15 '12 at 17:59
5  
Performance of this calculation is going to be completely dominated by log. Therefore, you want the branch in there, because you don't want to call log if you're going to throw away the answer. –  zwol Nov 15 '12 at 18:03
1  
Logarithm is implemented as a function on x86-64. It's unlikely that not branching but calling the expensive function always brings more than branching and occassionally not calling it. –  FUZxxl Nov 15 '12 at 18:04
5  
For the purposes of testing performance, just replace the function with return x * log(x). That gives the wrong answer, sure, but it's no slower than whatever branch-free code you could possibly come up with. So unless it's dramatically faster than what you have, you can stop. There's no need to actually come up with the branch-free code because you've established that it won't help. –  Steve Jessop Nov 15 '12 at 18:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Any branch free code must contain a calculation of x * log(x) to cover the "normal" case.

So, before trying to come up with that branch-free code, measure the speed of x * log(x) alone. Unless it's significantly faster than the code you have, there's nothing significant to be gained here. And I suspect it won't be.

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First note that log(1) = 0. Then you can write the problem as x * log(y), where y = 1 if x <= 0, and otherwise equals x; if y = 1, then x doesn't matter, because log(y)=0.

Something like y = (x > 0)*x + (x <= 0) will do this, and then:

double f(int x) {
    return x * log((x > 0)*x + (x <= 0));
}

It just depends on whether log(1) and four integer ops are worse than a branch.

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1  
Works. As you said, it's probably a lot slower than a branch. It does provide a perfect answer to the OP's question, though, so +1. –  Tim Kemp Nov 15 '12 at 18:27
    
I'd be curious if log(1) is a special case that bails out early. Even then, though, the two comparisons, add, and multiply may take longer than a branch. –  Hodapp Nov 15 '12 at 18:29
    
+1 for that answer! –  George Nov 15 '12 at 18:35
    
Of course it's down to the compiler whether this code is actually branch-free or not, but it has the nice feature of looking like it might be ;-) –  Steve Jessop Nov 15 '12 at 21:11
    
But where would a compiler get a branch out of this? From the comparison operators? –  Hodapp Nov 15 '12 at 21:18

Compiler extensions can help here. In GCC, you would do this:

if(__builtin_expect(x > 0, 1)) {
    return x * log(x);
}
return 0.0;

GCC will then generate machine code that favors the x > 0 == 1 branch.

If you don't care about negative numbers, then you can treat x == 0 as an unlikely branch instead:

if(__builtin_expect(x == 0, 0)) {
    return 0.0;
}
return x * log(x);

If you're not on GCC, you should check the documentation of your compiler and see whether it provides an analogous feature.

Note that it's still not branch-free. It's just that the likely branch takes less time.

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When x is 0 “true about 25% of the time”, I do not think that favoring x > 0 helps. –  Pascal Cuoq Nov 15 '12 at 18:04
1  
@PascalCuoq If x is <=0 25% of the time, then it's >0 75% of the time. So that's what favored here. At least that's how I understood the question. –  Nikos C. Nov 15 '12 at 18:07
    
This gets rid of the jump in the more frequent case, but not of the branch, as I understand the term. It probably still helps the OP, so I'm upvoting. –  user4815162342 Nov 15 '12 at 18:10

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