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I am facing a situation where I need to add the same blocks of code to the start and the end of multiple functions in JavaScript. e.g.

function funcA () {
    // code block 1
    ...

    // code unique to funcA
    ...

    // code block 2
    ...
}

function funcB () {
    // code block 1
    ...

    // code unique to funcB
    ...

    // code block 2
    ...
}

function funcC () {
    // code block 1
    ...

    // code unique to funcC
    ...

    // code block 2
    ...
}

I wonder what is the right pattern to use here to minimize the duplications.

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1  
Why not use functions for code block one and two? –  InBetween Nov 15 '12 at 18:20
1  
@InBetween, i was hoping if there was a way similar to decorator in python... –  MLister Nov 15 '12 at 18:45
    
I've provided a pattern below that solves this problem. It's like a diet-decorator. –  elucid8 Nov 15 '12 at 19:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use another function to build your functions for you:

function makeFunc( specialProcessing ) {
  return function() {
    // block 1
    specialProcessing( x, y, z );
    // block 2
  };
}

var func1 = makeFunc( function( x, y, z ) {
  // stuff for func1
});

var func2 = makeFunc( function( x, y, z ) {
  // stuff for func2
});
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1  
This seems like it would be much less readable and more difficult to use than simply extracting the duplicated code into a separate function. –  Chris Hayes Nov 15 '12 at 18:24
2  
+1 Function factories (or decorators, or whatever) are a nice clean way when there are several such functions. –  I Hate Lazy Nov 15 '12 at 18:31

Its called the extract method refactoring.

function block1() 
{
  // code block 1
}

function block2() 
{
  // code block 2
}

function funcA () {
    block1();

    // code unique to funcA
    ....

    block2();
}
function funcB () {
    block1();

    //   code unique to funcB
    ....

    block2();
}
function funcC () {
    block1();

    //   code unique to funcC
    ....

    block2();
}
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If you have sizable chunks of code in these blocks that can be applied to each function universally, by simply changing the variables in use, then you should extract those blocks of codes to separate methods. This has the advantage of promoting code reuse, improving readability of your code, and making it much, much easier to test and debug, particularly if you're following test-driven development ideals or even just running your own functional testing. It is always a goal of good software engineering and design to create small methods that are useful in many places to reduce the work you have to do and decrease the number of bugs in your code.

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Blocks can be extracted to functions and called using the apply method. This will keep context and forward any arguments passed to original function.

function funcA() {
    block1.apply(this, arguments);

    // specific code to funcA

    block2.apply(this, arguments);
}

arguments will contain any arguments passed to parent function

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If you know it'll always be set up like that and you don't want to have the actual function calls inside of it, or maybe some will be in different orders I always like to set up a function to interwine the function calls for me.

jsFiddle DEMO

// Set up dynamically to handle calling any number of functions
// in whatever order they are specified in the parameters
// ie: setupFunctionOrder(func1, func2, func3, func4);

function setupFunctionOrder () {
    for (i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) {
        arguments[i]();
    }
}

function block1 () { log('\nblock1 - running'); }
function block2 () { log('block2 - running'); }
function funcA () { log('funcA - running'); }

// ** Useage:
// now we make the actual call to set up the ORDER of calling -funcA-
setupFunctionOrder(block1, funcA, block2);
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Just pass in the function you want to be unique. Like this:

function reusableFunc(fn) {
    //reused code block here
    fn();
    //reused code block here
}

var myResuableFunc1 = function (args) {
    reusableFunc(function () { 
        //do your business here.    
    });
};


var myResuableFunc2 = function (args) {
    reusableFunc(function () { 
        //do your business here.    
    });
};

//Or another way
function myResuableFunc3(args) {
    reusableFunc(function () { 
        //do your business here
    });
}

Then, you can create as many functions using the shared code as you want and, through the power of closures, pass these newly created functions around any way that you like.

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