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I was wondering if it is possible, access a byte[] with an offset without having to copy data around?
I've looked at Arrays.*, ByteArrayInputStream and System.arraycopy, but they all require to allocate a new byte[] to copy to.

What I want is an equivalent to this in C++:

char* buffer = new char[256];
char* buf_offset = buffer + 128; // <- no copy
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There is no direct equivalent for this in Java, but for example String is implemented to achieve a very similar thing: substring() returns a new String instance that internally uses the exact same char[] as the original. That would be the idiomatic Java way. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 15 '12 at 18:31
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That's why APIs that take byte arrays would very often have two extra parameters - for offset and length :) –  dasblinkenlight Nov 15 '12 at 18:32
    
@MarkoTopolnik: substring() can work that way, but doesn't have to. I believe the Sun JRE changed recently around that. –  Jon Skeet Nov 15 '12 at 18:33
    
@MarkoTopolnik, oracle changed substring().................. –  irreputable Nov 15 '12 at 18:33
1  
@MarkoTopolnik You should check more recent builds, b147 is ancient. I think it was around the 1.7u6 –  Daniel Teply Nov 15 '12 at 18:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can pass ByteBuffer around instead. It can be advanced, duplicated, sliced without copying.

ByteBuffer is really ugly and counter-intuitive. However it's being used extensively in new JDK APIs, so one can probably accept that it's a basic type.

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Thanks, that did the trick! –  Chris Nov 15 '12 at 18:44
    
Don't thank me, ByteBuffer will give you lots of heartaches –  irreputable Nov 15 '12 at 18:46
    
For this small task I need it for, it's just fine ;) –  Chris Nov 15 '12 at 18:47

No, there's no equivalent of that. You'll just need to keep track of the offset yourself. You could always create a class to encapsulate the (data, offset) pair.

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That's unfortunate, but I guess I have to live with that. Thanks –  Chris Nov 15 '12 at 18:30
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You don't need to create a class for that. ByteBuffer does exactly that (amongst other things). –  Dunes Nov 15 '12 at 18:34
    
@Dunes: The "amongst other things" is the problem though - if I want to deal with an API which is really just an array and an offset, I'd rather have just that than use ByteBuffer with all its other operations. –  Jon Skeet Nov 15 '12 at 18:35
    
ByteBuffer is really ugly and counter-intuitive. However it's being used extensively in new JDK APIs, so one can probably accept that it's a basic type. –  irreputable Nov 15 '12 at 18:38
    
@irreputable: It's far from basic. It's available out of the box, certainly, but that's far from a description of "basic". –  Jon Skeet Nov 15 '12 at 18:51

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