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Using a cypher query on neo4j, in a directed, cyclic graph I need a BFS query and a target node sorting per depth level.

For the within-depth sorting, a custom "total path cost function" should be used, calculated based on

  • all relation attributes r.followrank between start and end node.
  • relation directionality (followrank if it points towards end node, or 0 if not)

At any search depth level n, a node connected to a high ranked node at level n-m, m>0 should be ranked higher than a node connected to a low ranked node at level n-m. Reverse directionality should result in a 0 rank (which means, the node and its subtree are still part of the ranking).

I'm using neo4j community-1.9.M01. The approach I've taken so far was to extract an array of followranks for the shortest path to each end node

I thought I've come up with a great first idea for this query but it seems to break down at multiple points.

My query is:

START strt=node(7)
MATCH p=strt-[*1..]-tgt
WHERE not(tgt=strt)
RETURN ID(tgt), extract(r in rels(p): r.followrank*length(strt-[*0..]-()-[r]->() )) as rank, extract(n in nodes(p): ID(n));

which outputs

==> +-----------------------------------------------------------------+
==> | ID(tgt) | rank                  | extract(n in nodes(p): ID(n)) |
==> +-----------------------------------------------------------------+
==> | 14      | [1.0]                 | [7,14]                        |
==> | 15      | [1.0,1.0]             | [7,14,15]                     |
==> | 11      | [1.0,1.0,1.0]         | [7,14,15,11]                  |
==> | 8       | [1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,0.0] | [7,14,15,11,7,8]              |
==> | 9       | [1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,0.0] | [7,14,15,11,7,9]              |
==> | 10      | [1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,0.0] | [7,14,15,11,7,10]             |
==> | 12      | [1.0,1.0,1.0,0.0]     | [7,14,15,11,12]               |
==> | 8       | [0.0]                 | [7,8]                         |
==> | 9       | [0.0]                 | [7,9]                         |
==> | 10      | [0.0]                 | [7,10]                        |
==> | 11      | [1.0]                 | [7,11]                        |
==> | 15      | [1.0,1.0]             | [7,11,15]                     |
==> | 14      | [1.0,1.0,1.0]         | [7,11,15,14]                  |
==> | 8       | [1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,0.0] | [7,11,15,14,7,8]              |
==> | 9       | [1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,0.0] | [7,11,15,14,7,9]              |
==> | 10      | [1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,0.0] | [7,11,15,14,7,10]             |
==> | 12      | [1.0,0.0]             | [7,11,12]                     |
==> +-----------------------------------------------------------------+
==> 17 rows
==> 38 ms

It looks similar to what I need, but the issues are

  1. nodes 8, 9, 10, 11 have the same relation direction to 7! The inverse query result ...*length(strt-[*0..]-()-[r]->() )... looks even stranger - see the queries right below.
  2. I don't know how to normalize the results of the length() expression to 1.

Directionality:

START strt=node(7)
MATCH strt<-[r]-m
RETURN ID(m), r.followrank;
==> +----------------------+
==> | ID(m) | r.followrank |
==> +----------------------+
==> | 8     | 1            |
==> | 9     | 1            |
==> | 10    | 1            |
==> | 11    | 1            |
==> +----------------------+
==> 4 rows
==> 0 ms
START strt=node(7)
MATCH strt-[r]->m
RETURN ID(m), r.followrank;
==> +----------------------+
==> | ID(m) | r.followrank |
==> +----------------------+
==> | 14    | 1            |
==> +----------------------+
==> 1 row
==> 0 ms

Inverse query:

START strt=node(7)
MATCH p=strt-[*1..]-tgt
WHERE not(tgt=strt)
RETURN ID(tgt), extract(rr in rels(p): rr.followrank*length(strt-[*0..]-()<-[rr]-() )) as rank, extract(n in nodes(p): ID(n));
==> +-----------------------------------------------------------------+
==> | ID(tgt) | rank                  | extract(n in nodes(p): ID(n)) |
==> +-----------------------------------------------------------------+
==> | 14      | [1.0]                 | [7,14]                        |
==> | 15      | [1.0,1.0]             | [7,14,15]                     |
==> | 11      | [1.0,1.0,1.0]         | [7,14,15,11]                  |
==> | 8       | [1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,3.0] | [7,14,15,11,7,8]              |
==> | 9       | [1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,3.0] | [7,14,15,11,7,9]              |
==> | 10      | [1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,3.0] | [7,14,15,11,7,10]             |
==> | 12      | [1.0,1.0,1.0,2.0]     | [7,14,15,11,12]               |
==> | 8       | [3.0]                 | [7,8]                         |
==> | 9       | [3.0]                 | [7,9]                         |
==> | 10      | [3.0]                 | [7,10]                        |
==> | 11      | [1.0]                 | [7,11]                        |
==> | 15      | [1.0,1.0]             | [7,11,15]                     |
==> | 14      | [1.0,1.0,1.0]         | [7,11,15,14]                  |
==> | 8       | [1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,3.0] | [7,11,15,14,7,8]              |
==> | 9       | [1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,3.0] | [7,11,15,14,7,9]              |
==> | 10      | [1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0,3.0] | [7,11,15,14,7,10]             |
==> | 12      | [1.0,2.0]             | [7,11,12]                     |
==> +-----------------------------------------------------------------+
==> 17 rows
==> 30 ms

So my questions are:

  1. what's going on with this query?
  2. is there a working approach?

For an additional detail, I know the min(length(path)) aggregator, but it doesn't work in this case where I'm trying to extract information about the best hit - the additional information I return about the best hit will disaggreate the result again - I think that's a cypher limitation.

share|improve this question
    
to the first part of your question, check this: console.neo4j.org/r/gm59jt vs. console.neo4j.org/r/nvbdud . when you have not defined direction in the match part, than traveling algorithm goes to one node, than back to the starting node, and than simply to another. the same counts for longer paths, like goes from the starting node to the nexth and nexth, than 2x back and again somewhere else. this is not against any graph theory - it actually is a correct behavior. –  ulkas Nov 16 '12 at 15:01
    
actually and apologies, it may be that this is the issue here indeed. But why would the path not reflect this? Even if I return the whole path p instead of just nodes(p), there is no sign of such routing. I would expect the path to say "x->z->x->y" and length(p) = 3. Is this a neo4j bug? –  bebbi Jul 19 '13 at 9:17
    
might be more of a neo4j implementation on the relationships direction. for example: when creating a graph but not setting any direction for its relationships, neo4j adds the directions itself. this is due to some historical reason, i guess the performance is better when calculating with 2 kind of rels (outgoing and ingoin) than with 3(outgoing, ingoing, non-directed). thus, i assume your result does not show the directions of rels in the path, because it was not defined in origin, although you see some rels now. –  ulkas Jul 19 '13 at 9:32
1  
hm. not sure I understand the reasoning, but in my case I always define direction when I create relationships - so there must be another reason? It seems I see the issue when 2 nodes are connected with 2 same-type relationships, 1 ingoing + 1 outgoing –  bebbi Jul 19 '13 at 11:18

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