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I have a SQL Server (2012) which I access using Entity Framework (4.1). In the database I have a table called URL into which an independent process feeds new URLs. An entry in the URL table can be in state "New", "In Process" or "Processed".

I need to access the URL table from different computers, check for URL entries with status "New", take the first one and mark it as "In Process".

var newUrl = dbEntity.URLs.FirstOrDefault(url => url.StatusID == (int) URLStatus.New);
if(newUrl != null)
{
    newUrl.StatusID = (int) URLStatus.InProcess;
    dbEntity.SaveChanges();
}
//Process the URL

Since the query and update are not atomic, I can have two different computers read and update the same URL entry in the database.

Is there a way to make the select-then-update sequence atomic to avoid such clashes?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Try this:

using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required, new TransactionOptions { IsolationLevel = IsolationLevel.RepeatableRead }))
{
    var newUrl = dbEntity.URLs.FirstOrDefault(url => url.StatusID == (int) URLStatus.New);
    if(newUrl != null)
    {
        newUrl.StatusID = (int) URLStatus.InProcess;
        dbEntity.SaveChanges();
    }
    scope.Complete();
}

The IsolationLevel.RepeatableRead will apply a lock to all rows that are read in such a way that a Thread 2 cannot read from Table A if Table A has been read by Thread 1 and Thread 1 did not complete the Transaction.

Just a side note about TransactionScopes:

When you surround your code with a TransactionScope you are not creating any transaction, you are just creating a scope in which a transaction may be required. When you read data insinde your using, Entity Framework would create a transaction, but it won't anymore, because now, due to the TransactionScope, you are in charge of the transaction. That is: You will determine the IsolationLevel and you are responsible for commiting or rolling back the transaction. By default, the isolation level will apply a lock on write. That is, if I write an URL, it will lock the URLs table for reading and writting. In order to apply a lock on read, you use IsolationLevel.RepeatableRead.

If you create more transactions inside your TransactionScope it will be promoted to a distributed transaction, but that is outside the scope of my answer.

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1  
Are you sur about the READ action will lock the row ?? Michal bear answer's and my tests conclude that NOT. So Is it a mystake from us or you ? thanks –  Julian50 Apr 2 at 9:14
2  
I tested. It's not preventing simultaneous reads. This question needs attention. –  Saeed Neamati Jun 7 at 10:06
2  
i tested too, this isn't locking. –  StackTrace Jun 9 at 8:22
1  
@andrerpena: i read comments from and it looks like this solution did not worked? i wanted to use this in our project but looks like now i am confused can you please help out here and describe how you tested it? –  Anshul Nigam Jul 22 at 9:47
1  
I also verified,this approach is not blocking the rows to get read from db –  Anshul Nigam Jul 24 at 7:47

I cannot add a comment to Andre's answer, but I am concerned about this comment "The IsolationLevel.RepeatableRead will apply a lock to all rows that are read in such a way that a Thread 2 cannot read from Table A if Table A has been read by Thread 1 and Thread 1 did not complete the Transaction."

The repeatable read only says that you will hold all locks until the end of a transaction. When you use this isolation level in a transaction and read a row (say the max value) a "Shared" lock is issued and will be held until the transaction completes. This shared lock will prevent another thread from updating the row (the update would try to apply an Exclusive lock on the row and that would be blocked by the existing shared lock), but it will allow another thread to read the value (the second thread will put another shared lock on the row - which is allowed (that is why they are called shared locks)). So to make the above statement correct, it would need to say "The IsolationLevel.RepeatableRead will apply a lock to all rows that are read in such a way that a Thread 2 cannot update Table A if Table A has been read by Thread 1 and Thread 1 did not complete the Transaction."

For the original question, you would need to use a repeatable read isolation level AND escalate the lock to an Exclusive lock to prevent two processes from reading and updating the same value. All the solutions would involve mapping EF to custom SQL (as escalating the lock type is not built into EF),. You could use jocull answer or you could use an update with an output clause to lock the rows (update statements always get Exclusive locks and in 2008 or above can return a result set).

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I was only able to really accomplish this by manually issuing a lock statement to a table. This does a complete table lock, so be careful with it! In my case it was useful for creating a queue that I didn't want multiple processes touching at once.

using (Entities entities = new Entities())
using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
{
    //Lock the table during this transaction
    entities.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand("SELECT TOP 1 KeyColumn FROM MyTable WITH (TABLOCKX, HOLDLOCK)");

    //Do your work with the locked table here...

    //Complete the scope here to commit, otherwise it will rollback
    //The table lock will be released after we exit the TransactionScope block
    scope.Complete();
}

Update - In Entity Framework 6, especially with async / await code, you need to handle the transactions differently. This was crashing for us after some conversions.

using (Entities entities = new Entities())
using (DbContextTransaction scope = entities.Database.BeginTransaction())
{
    //Lock the table during this transaction
    entities.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand("SELECT TOP 1 KeyColumn FROM MyTable WITH (TABLOCKX, HOLDLOCK)");

    //Do your work with the locked table here...

    //Complete the scope here to commit, otherwise it will rollback
    //The table lock will be released after we exit the TransactionScope block
    scope.Commit();
}
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This is a really good solution. Works much better than the other solutions here using an IsolationLevel (with them I had issues with multiple access) for my case where I must ensure that only one thread can access a table at a time. –  Jürgen Bayer Sep 18 '14 at 19:37
    
even with this solution, when both threads A & B execute at the same time, both of them are locked out. Any solution for this scenario? –  StackTrace Jun 9 at 8:46
    
@SQL.NETWarrior Are you saying there is a deadlock that occurs? This is meant to be a mutex, so one thread should lock out the other, but then release when it's done. I haven't experienced a deadlock yet, but be careful not to open another context within this when you're querying. I've created deadlocks on accident by not locking in the exact same way each time. It's best if you operate on only one table at a time. –  jocull Jun 9 at 12:32

To mark the two operations as a transaction you can use a TransactionScope:

using (TransactionScope transactionScope =
           new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required,
               new TransactionOptions { IsolationLevel = IsolationLevel.RepeatableRead }))
{
    // Query
    // If not null - update

    transactionScope.Complete();
}

DbContext.SaveChanges() itself uses transactions behind the scenes so they are already considered atomic.

From MSDN:

SaveChanges operates within a transaction. SaveChanges will roll back that transaction and throw an exception if any of the dirty ObjectStateEntry objects cannot be persisted.

You can read more here.

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1  
This is wrong. The default IsolationLevel used by this TransactionScope will only apply a lock on the URLs table when a URL is written. You need to specify a RepeatableRead IsolationLevel in order to do what OP is asking. –  andrerpena Nov 15 '12 at 19:00
    
You're right, I forgot to add the TransactionScope options. Thanks –  strmstn Nov 15 '12 at 19:02

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