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I'm learning, or trying to learn about DBMS and am having all sorts of problems understanding how to compute a canonical cover for this:

A -> BCD
BC -> DE
B -> D
D -> A

I can only ever find 1 example of how to compute one of these and it doesn't help me understand what to do with the BC and B dependencies. This is what I came up with, which is surely wrong, but any help with breaking this down so I can understand would be more valuable than the actual answer.

A -> BCD
BC -> DE
D -> A
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Does your textbook have an algorithm? –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Nov 15 '12 at 21:19
    
no, it just gives an example like the one of this site (see #5): cs.sfu.ca/CourseCentral/354/zaiane/material/notes/Chap5/… –  James Brown Nov 15 '12 at 21:48
    
this is the same example in the textbook and is the only one I can find really. I understand it for the most part, but it doesn't really explain for the problem I have above. –  James Brown Nov 15 '12 at 21:49
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2 Answers

this BC->D is reducible, because in BC->D,in left C is an extraneous attribute. we can check this by using the formula for extraneous attribute.

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Here's one way to look at the two FDs

  • BC -> DE, and
  • B -> D

From BC->DE, derive BC->D and BC->E (decomposition).

BC->D
BC->E
B->D

Observe that the LHS of BC->D is reducible, because B->D. That reduces the two FDs at the top to

BC->E
B->D
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