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I've written the function which bubble-sorts some given array, and stops execution when the array is already sorted.

int sort(int *arr, int size) {
    int i, j, temp, st = 1, count = 0;
    for(i = 0; (i < size - 1) && (st == 1); i++)
    {
        st = 0;
        for(j = 0; j < size - 1; j++)
        {
            if(arr[j] < arr[j + 1])
            {
                temp = arr[j];
                arr[j] = arr[j + 1];
                arr[j + 1] = temp;
                st = 1;
            }
            count++;
        }
    }
   return count;
}

As you can see, the loop should be broken when the array is sorted before size^2 move.

However, something is wrong, and the count variable is always size * size, no matter what array I pass, even {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} gives the same results.

What is wrong?

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1 Answer 1

With the condition

if(arr[j] < arr[j + 1])

you are sorting the array in descending order. So if you pass it [5, 4, 3, 2, 1], you'll get a value of less than size*size.

Note that each iteration of the outer loop moves one element to its final place at the end of the array, so you can cut down the inner loop to run only

for(j = 0; j < size - 1 - i; j++)

If we run

#include <stdio.h>

int sort(int *arr, int size) {
    int i, j, temp, st = 1, count = 0;
    for(i = 0; (i < size - 1) && (st == 1); i++)
    {
        st = 0;
        for(j = 0; j < size - 1; j++)
        {
            if(arr[j] < arr[j + 1])
            {
                temp = arr[j];
                arr[j] = arr[j + 1];
                arr[j + 1] = temp;
                st = 1;
            }
            count++;
        }
    }
   return count;
}

int main(void) {
#ifdef ASCENDING
    int ar[] = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
#else
    int ar[] = { 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 };
#endif
    int i, ct = sort(ar, sizeof ar / sizeof ar[0]);
    printf("%d\n",ct);
    for(i = 0; i < (int)(sizeof ar / sizeof ar[0]); ++i) {
        printf("%d ", ar[i]);
    }
    printf("\n");
    return 0;
}

compiled without ASCENDING defined, the output is

4
5 4 3 2 1

thus the outer loop breaks after the first iteration because the array is already sorted as desired. When compiled with -DASCENDING, the array is originally in ascending order and needs the complete cycle to become sorted, i.e. the output is

16
5 4 3 2 1

(with the count being reduced to 10 if the inner loop runs only for j < size - 1 - i).

share|improve this answer
    
I thought he was talking about the count value. –  Alberto Bonsanto Nov 15 '12 at 19:03
    
Yes, but when an inner loop doesn't swap, the outer loop breaks, so if the array is sorted in the desired order, only one pass through the outer loop is made. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 15 '12 at 19:05
    
That's interesting, thanks for sharing. But I can't understand, why doesn't the outer loop break when the array is sorted, "if" isn't executed, and st is 0. –  user1615069 Nov 15 '12 at 19:08
    
@user1615069 It does break, but your input array { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 } isn't sorted according to the criterion used in the sorting function. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 15 '12 at 19:13
    
I can see that now, thanks! –  user1615069 Nov 15 '12 at 19:14

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