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I am trying to read values form my database. But why am I getting only values with no column name? this is my controller. that returns the values in JSON

            SqlCommand cmd = con.CreateCommand();

            cmd.CommandText = "SELECT DISTINCT State FROM MyDBtable";

            con.Open();
            List<string> StateList = new List<string>();
            SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();

            while (reader.Read())
            {
                StateList.Add(reader[0].ToString());
            }

            return Json(new
            {
                myTable = StateList
            }, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);

and this is my JSON

{"myTable":["VA","CA"]}

Where as, it's suppose to give me

{"myTable":[{"State":"VA"},{"State":"CA"}]}

Why is it not reading and printing State

share|improve this question
    
Use a debugger and step through your code expecting the values, you'll quickly find out the wrong line and you will have a more concise problem. Of course, this example is still simple enough for us to figure out but in larger code it might not be so obvious. –  Tom Wijsman Nov 15 '12 at 19:33
    
Hi Tom.. i know it's reading the right data... my table as several columns.. and one of them is State... it has list of states like "VA", "CA"... what I am trying to do is read all the states that are on my table... which it is doing... but not printing the name of the column... I am guessing the way I have set up LIST array is not right –  EagleFox Nov 15 '12 at 19:40
1  
What I'm saying is that the debugger will show you that StateList.Add(reader[0].ToString()); is adding just the state string and no longer the State property. –  Tom Wijsman Nov 15 '12 at 19:43
    
:) that is exactly my problem Tom... u put them in words for me... and like you said, I simplified the select statement to just one column... what I am working on has 7-8 columns and I am pretty sure tinkering with just on return Json will not solve my problem –  EagleFox Nov 15 '12 at 19:49
1  
No, I'm not saying you should solve this by yourself (if you can, great); but am just giving an example how debugging can help reveal the problem in general, such that you can say StateList is a list of strings, I want it to be a list of properties, how do I do that?. If you ever have a problem in much longer or harder code, that will definitely help us help you. Just an intermezzo, don't mind it... :) –  Tom Wijsman Nov 15 '12 at 20:06
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because you are selecting state. This will create a new object where the State property is assigned the state, such that you get what you want:

SqlCommand cmd = con.CreateCommand();

cmd.CommandText = "SELECT DISTINCT State FROM MyDBtable";

con.Open();
List<string> StateList = new List<string>();
SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();

while (reader.Read())
{
    StateList.Add(reader[0].ToString());
}

return Json(new
{
    myTable = StateList.Select(i => new { State = i })
}, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);

For additional columns, see lazyberezovsky's answer who has changed StateList to solve this.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks tom... any idea why I'd get syntax error –  EagleFox Nov 15 '12 at 19:36
    
Comments here have been removed. But for reference, there was an additional ;. –  Tom Wijsman Nov 15 '12 at 20:30
add comment

String does not have property "State". Create anonymous type instead:

myTable = StateList.Select(s => new { State = s })

UPDATE: Easiest solution for multiple columns - create a DTO for that

public class MyItem // of course use more descriptive name
{
   public string State { get; set; }
   public string Capital { get; set; }
   // etc
}

And fill it from reader:

List<MyItem> items = new List<MyItem>();

while (reader.Read())
{
    MyItem item = new MyItem();
    item.State = reader[0].ToString(); 
    item.Capital = reader[1].ToString(); 
    // etc
    items.Add(item);
}

return Json(new {  myTable = items }, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);

One more sample (with Dapper, which you can find on NuGet). Add using Dapper; to your code. Use same DTO class, as above.

using (var connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
    connection.Open();
    return Json(new {
       myTable = connection.Query<MyItem>("SELECT * FROM MyDBtable").ToList()
    }, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks lazyberezovsky... where should I put this in my code –  EagleFox Nov 15 '12 at 19:26
1  
@EagleFox when creating Json - replace myTable = StateList with this code –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 15 '12 at 19:28
2  
@EagleFox consider also use some ORM (Linq2Sql, EF, Dapper) - it will do mapping for you without dealing with datareaders and other ado.net stuff –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 15 '12 at 20:23
2  
@EagleFox btw don't forget to close SqlConnection. Tom, yep, but I'm not votes hunter :) That's why I spend my free time here after daily cap. Don't delete your answer! Its correct and accepted! –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 15 '12 at 20:31
1  
@EagleFox: I've been using EF for quite a while and it fits well in the whole LINQ world, I think LINQ2SQL is handy when you need to map to some existing database and I've seen Dapper as a good new improvement but haven't gotten that to work recently. The nice thing about those frameworks is that you can always jump back to SQL (or SqlBulkCopy for inserting) when you need performance, while being able to use much simpler code otherwise. –  Tom Wijsman Nov 15 '12 at 20:32
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