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I suppose some other folks ran into this design issue before so I hope someone could give me some advice on what to do: I have a class that is supposed to hold a private generic object. As far as I can tell, I can't get away without making the entire class a template. FINE. But now, is there any way to infer the type of the underlying object during construction from the constructor parameter, without explicitly specifying it (I want to omit the template parameter, Derived, when I instantiate the Test class):

#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
class Generic
{
};

class Derived : public Generic<int>
{
public:
    Derived ();
    int GetFoo ();
private:
    int m_foo;
};

template <typename T>
class Test
{
public:
    Test (T &underlying);
private:
    T m_underlying;
};

Derived::Derived ()
{
    this->m_foo = 666;
}

int Derived::GetFoo ()
{
    return this->m_foo;
}

template<typename T>
Test<T>::Test (T &underlying) : m_underlying(underlying)
{
    std::cout << this->m_underlying.GetFoo() << std::endl;
}

int main ()
{
    Derived underlying;
    Test<Derived> test(underlying);

    return 0;
}

Is there any other design strategy that I should be aware of, in order to achieve my goal?

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How about boost::any? –  Kerrek SB Nov 15 '12 at 19:44
    
@KerrekSB I'd rather not involve BOOST at this point, if I can help it... I mean, am I asking for too much from C++? –  Mihai Todor Nov 15 '12 at 19:45
1  
See stackoverflow.com/questions/797594/… –  bshields Nov 15 '12 at 19:47
1  
I won't argue, but that amount of fear of Boost is anything but healthy. Haha. "Any"... get it? –  Kerrek SB Nov 15 '12 at 19:47
    
@KerrekSB Very funny, mister :) –  Mihai Todor Nov 15 '12 at 19:49
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Usually you have a class template together with a type-deducing function template:

template <typename T>
struct Foo
{
    Foo(T const &);
};

template <typename T>
Foo<T> make_foo(T const & t)
{
    return Foo<T>(t);
}

Usage:

auto foo = make_foo(1728);   // makes a Foo<int>

This idea is used countless times in the standard library (such as make_pair, make_tuple, make_shared). The guiding principle is that you should say the desired typename at most one time, and not at all if it can be inferred.

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Thanks. Too bad I won't be able to make use of the class constructor directly :( –  Mihai Todor Nov 15 '12 at 19:57
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Just make a function to create Test object:

template <typename T> 
Test<T> make_test(T& underlying)
{
    return Test<T>(underlying);
}

int main ()
{
    Derived underlying;
    auto test = make_test(underlying);

    return 0;
}
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