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Hey guys so I'm trying to learn objective c as an independent study for my school and one of my projects just to practice is making a calculator program where the user inputs a string of numbers and operators and the program breaks it apart and does the calculation. Right now I have the input and I'm trying to have it find the operators and put them all in an array so that it can sort them to find order of operations and use the indices to find the different terms; however, when I try to print out the array to see if its holding the chars, it outputs some weird symbols like the apple logo or an upside down question mark. I've made an SSCCE of my problem -- does anyone know whats going on?

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
@autoreleasepool {

    NSString *calculation;
    char str[50] = {0};
    int count = 0;

    NSLog(@"What would you like to calculate?");
    scanf("%s", str);
    calculation = [NSString stringWithUTF8String:str];

    for (int i = 0; i < [calculation length]; i++) {
        NSRange range = NSMakeRange (i, 1);
        if([[calculation substringWithRange: range] isEqualToString: @"*"] ||
           [[calculation substringWithRange: range] isEqualToString: @"/"])
            count++;
    }

    char operators[count];
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < [calculation length]; j++) {
            NSRange range = NSMakeRange (j, 1);
            NSString *s = [s initWithString:[calculation substringWithRange: range]];
            if([s isEqualToString:@"*"]){
                operators[i] = '*';
                break;
            }
            if([s isEqualToString:@"/"]){
                operators[i] = '/';
                break;
            }
        }
        NSLog(@"%c", operators[i]);
    }

}
return 0;
}
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Why aren't you using -characterAtIndex? –  Richard J. Ross III Nov 15 '12 at 19:49
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To answer your question about what is going on in your code. The "weird symbols" you are seeing are the un-initialized values in memory at your operators[] array.

To see the reason the char[] is left with garbage values look at this section of your code:

    ...
    NSString *s = [s initWithString:[calculation substringWithRange: range]];
    if([s isEqualToString:@"*"]){
        operators[i] = '*';
        break;
    }
    ...

You are sending initWithString to s. s is not yet allocated. This results in s being a nil. And since sending a message like isEqualToString: to a nil will essentially evaluate NO even when an @"*" is in that range your assignment to operators[i] will never happen.

Easy fix though, just replace the s assignment with this:

NSString *s = [calculation substringWithRange:range];
share|improve this answer
    
'This results in s being a nil' - only under ARC. –  user529758 Nov 15 '12 at 20:32
    
Thanks! Thats what I originally tried but for some reason it wasn't working. It's all good now. –  Matt Cooper Nov 15 '12 at 20:45
    
@MattCooper I'm glad this helped. I generally try not to over-advise self described learning exercises, But, RichardRoss's advice to use -characterAtIndex: is good advice. It's more efficient, it doesn't create a new NSString each time, it simply returns a unichar which you can compare with ==. And since composed character sets are unlikely to come up in a simple calculator(the main reason -characterAtIndex: is frowned upon) it should be safe. –  NJones Nov 15 '12 at 20:56
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You don't need anything fancy for this. But: use stuff for what it is there for.

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

int main()
{
    NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [NSAutoreleasePool new];

    char str[128];
    printf("Enter formula:\n");
    scanf("%s", str); // this is DAMN unsafe, btw

    NSMutableArray *arr = [NSMutableArray array];

    char *s = str;
    while (*s) {
        if (*s == '*') {
            [arr addObject:@"*"];
        } else if (*s == '/') {
            [arr addObject:@"/"];
        }
        s++;
    }
    printf("\n");

    [arr enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
        NSLog(@"%@", obj);
    }];

    [pool drain];
    return 0;
}
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does your code care about order of operations? what output will be for this string @"3*6/2*4" ? –  Space Dust Nov 15 '12 at 20:28
    
@SpaceDust The output will be * / *. But come on, why don't you try it? –  user529758 Nov 15 '12 at 20:30
    
so you say it is simply questioners problem... –  Space Dust Nov 15 '12 at 20:34
    
@SpaceDust I didn't get what you mean by that. –  user529758 Nov 15 '12 at 20:35
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