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I'm brand new to unit testing, and I'm using the VS 2010 unit testing framework.

I've got a function that grabs an integer from the user, then executes different functions based on user input. I've read a lot on unit testing but I haven't found anything that shows me how to test each branch of a switch statement. What I've got so far:

    [TestMethod]
    public void RunBankApplication_Case1()
    {
        using (var sw = new StringWriter())
        {
            using (var sr = new StringReader("1"))
            {
                Console.SetOut(sw);
                Console.SetIn(sr);
                BankManager newB = new BankManager();
                newB.RunBankApplication();
                var result = sw.ToString();

                string expected = "Enter Account Number: ";
                Assert.IsTrue(result.Contains(expected));
            }
        }
    }

When the function under case 1 gets called, the first thing that happens is the string "Enter Account Number: " gets written to the console. However, this isn't working at all. Am I not passing input to the console correctly? Thanks for the help!

Edit: my RunBankApplication() function:

do
      {
            DisplayMenu();

            option = GetMenuOption();

            switch (option)
            {
                case 1:
                    if (!CreateAccount())
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("WARNING: Could not create account!");
                    }
                    break;
                case 2:
                    if (!DeleteAccount())
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("WARNING: Could not delete account!");
                    }

                    break;
                case 3:
                    if (!UpdateAccount())
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("WARNING: Could not update account!");
                    }

                    break;
                case 4: DisplayAccount();
                    break;
                case 5: status = false;
                    break;
                default: Console.WriteLine("ERROR: Invalid choice!");
                    break;
            }
        } while (status);
share|improve this question
1  
Ideally you'd have your application set up to use Dependency Injection so that you can use a Mock to represent dependencies. –  James Michael Hare Nov 15 '12 at 20:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I suppose your RunBankApplication looks similar to this:

public void RunBankApplication()
{
    var input = Console.ReadLine();
    switch (input)
    {
        case "1":
            Console.WriteLine("Enter Account Number: ");
            break;
        case "2":
            Console.WriteLine("Hello World!");
            break;
        default:
            break;
    }
}

To get read of your fixed dependency on Console which makes your method untestable you should inject this dependency in constructor.

You need an interface defining your dependency:

public interface IConsoleService
{
    string ReadLine();
    void WriteLine(string message);
}

You create a default implementation for it:

public class ConsoleService : IConsoleService
{
    public string ReadLine()
    {
        return Console.ReadLine();
    }

    public void WriteLine(string message)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(message);
    }
}

You then inject this implementation in your BankManager class and use it inside the class:

public class BankManager
{
    private IConsoleService _consoleService;

    public BankManager(IConsoleService consoleService)
    {
        _consoleService = consoleService;
    }

    public void RunBankApplication()
    {
        var input = _consoleService.ReadLine();
        switch (input)
        {
            case "1":
                _consoleService.WriteLine("Enter Account Number: ");
                break;
            case "2":
                _consoleService.WriteLine("Hello World!");
                break;
            default:
                break;
        }
    }
}

Now you can mock this dependency in your tests. Moq is good choice of such a mocking library:

[TestClass]
public class UnitTest1
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void GetMessage_Input1_ReturnEnterAccountNumberMessage()
    {
        var consoleService = new Mock<IConsoleService>();
        consoleService.Setup(c => c.ReadLine()).Returns("1");

        var bankManager = new BankManager(consoleService.Object);
        bankManager.RunBankApplication();

        consoleService.Verify(c => c.WriteLine("Enter Account Number: "), Times.Once());
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void GetMessage_Input2_ReturnHelloWorldMessage()
    {
        var consoleService = new Mock<IConsoleService>();
        consoleService.Setup(c => c.ReadLine()).Returns("2");

        var bankManager = new BankManager(consoleService.Object);
        bankManager.RunBankApplication();

        consoleService.Verify(c => c.WriteLine("Hello World!"), Times.Once());
    }
}

Sure, this is an overkill for such a simple example, but the approach is really useful in larger projects. As a next step you can then use an IoC container to automatically inject your dependency in the application.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks great! I haven't used Moq before, but I'll do some reading into it. My only question is: what if I have a function that gets user input already and returns that integer (I've updated my op to show what my function RunBankApplication() looks like. –  SantasNotReal Nov 15 '12 at 21:14
    
@Brandon If GetMenuOption is in the same class and it also communicates with console than you can test it the same way, i.e. it should use your console abstraction. An even better approach would be to mock that function as well when you're testing RunBankApplication. Having it in a different class would make that easier. –  Damir Arh Nov 16 '12 at 5:37

There shouldn't be user input with automated testing. Your tests need to provide the parameters, and if you rely on external resources (WCF services, databases, file system, user input, etc...), then you need to mock them. This is what testing frameworks like Moq do for you.

If you want to test each case of a switch statement, then you need a test for each case.

By the way, you're not able to use the console because your unit tests are probably in a class library and not a console app.

share|improve this answer

it's not right approach. You shouldn't communicate with Console in unit tests. Just extract your function which works with input parameters and test this function.

like this:

in YourExtractedClass:

      public string GetMessage(string input)
        {
            var result = string.Empty;

            switch (input)
            {
                case "1":
                    result = "Enter Account Number: ";
                    break;
                case "2":
                    result = "Hello World!";
                    break;
                default:
                    break;
            }

            return result;
        }

....

In your Test class for YourExtractedClass

    [Test]
    public void GetMessage_Input1_ReturnEnterAccountNumberMessage()
    {
        var result = GetMessage("1");
        var expected = "Enter Account Number: ";

        Assert.That(result == expected);
    }

    [Test]
    public void GetMessage_Input2_ReturnHelloWorldMessage()
    {
        var result = GetMessage("1");
        var expected = "Hello World!";

        Assert.That(result == expected);
    }

And one more thing: it's better to move you strings ("Enter Account Number" etc) to one place (fro example to some Constants class). Don't repeat yourself!

read good books about unit testing:

The Art of Unit Testing: With Examples in .Net

Pragmatic Unit Testing in C# with NUnit, 2nd Edition

xUnit Test Patterns: Refactoring Test Code

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, only 2 of any of the functions I'm working with require any input parameters (not including constructors), otherwise this would be a great way to unit test. –  SantasNotReal Nov 15 '12 at 21:04
    
@Brandon just read "The Art of Unit Testing" - you'll find a lot of interesting information about unit testing. –  Dmitry Khryukin Nov 15 '12 at 21:10

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