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I am using this code to import text file to my ListBox

        OpenFileDialog openFileDialog1 = new OpenFileDialog();
        openFileDialog1.Filter = "Text Files|*.txt";
        openFileDialog1.Title = "Select a Text file";
        openFileDialog1.FileName = "";
        DialogResult result = openFileDialog1.ShowDialog();
        if (result == DialogResult.OK)
        {
            string file = openFileDialog1.FileName;

            string[] text = System.IO.File.ReadAllLines(file);
            foreach (string line in text)
            {
                listBox2.Items.Add(line);

            }
            listBox2.Items.Add("");
        }

It works fine for small text files, with 10 lines or so, but when I try to import bigger list, (4-5 megabytes) the program isn't responding and it's crashing.

Any help?

share|improve this question
    
How many lines are in the 4-5 megabyte file? –  MatthewRz Nov 15 '12 at 20:16
1  
What's the error when it crashes? –  DJ Burb Nov 15 '12 at 20:18
    
i could be wrong, but if i remember correctly there was some 64k limit on listboxes –  DarkSquirrel42 Nov 15 '12 at 20:20
3  
Putting that much in a listbox seems like overkill. Usually listboxes are used for user interaction. If you need that much information in a listbox, you may want to rethink things. What exactly are you trying to do in your requirements? –  DJ Burb Nov 15 '12 at 20:25
1  
well it depends on what you are trying to do. What are the requirements given to you –  DJ Burb Nov 15 '12 at 20:26

5 Answers 5

Use the BufferedStream class in C# to improve performance.
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.bufferedstream.aspx

share|improve this answer

By using this:

string[] text = System.IO.File.ReadAllLines(file);
listBox1.Items.AddRange(text);

instead of this:

string[] text = System.IO.File.ReadAllLines(file);
foreach (string line in text)
{
       listBox2.Items.Add(line);
}

you will speed up the execution at least 10-15 times because you are not invalidating listBox on every Item insert. I have measured with few thousand lines.

The bottleneck could also be ReadAllLines if your text has too many lines. Even though I can't figure out why you would be inserting so many lines, will user be able to find the line he/she needs?

EDIT OK then I suggest you to use BackgroundWorker, here is the code:

First you initialize BackGroundWorker:

 BackgroundWorker bgw;
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            bgw = new BackgroundWorker();
            bgw.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(bgw_DoWork);
            bgw.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(bgw_RunWorkerCompleted);
        }

Then you call it in your method:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if (!bgw.IsBusy)
            {
                OpenFileDialog openFileDialog1 = new OpenFileDialog();
                openFileDialog1.Filter = "Text Files|*.txt";
                openFileDialog1.Title = "Select a Text file";
                openFileDialog1.FileName = "";
                DialogResult result = openFileDialog1.ShowDialog();
                if (result == DialogResult.OK)
                {
                    string file = openFileDialog1.FileName;
                    listView1.BeginUpdate();
                    bgw.RunWorkerAsync(file);
                }
            }
            else
                MessageBox.Show("File reading at the moment, try later!");
        }


        void bgw_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
        {
            listView1.EndUpdate();
        }
        void bgw_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
        {
            string fileName = (string)e.Argument;
            TextReader t = new StreamReader(fileName);
            string line = string.Empty;
            while ((line = t.ReadLine()) != null)
            {
                string nLine = line;
                this.Invoke((MethodInvoker)delegate { listBox1.Items.Add(nLine); });
            }
        }

It will add each line when it reads it, you will have responsive UI, and lines won't affect the listBox before it finishes loading.

share|improve this answer
    
Same, I have no idea :( –  user1815324 Nov 15 '12 at 20:33
    
Check the answer now! –  Nikola Davidovic Nov 15 '12 at 20:59
    
Have you checked the answer? –  Nikola Davidovic Nov 16 '12 at 16:26

It maybe simply not completing its job, and you should have to wait for more. Try with this solution:

http://www.bytechaser.com/en/articles/f3a3niqyb7/display-large-lists-in-listview-control-quickly.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
I'd rather use listBox than listView. –  user1815324 Nov 15 '12 at 20:31
    
if the user does not need to see it, do not user a user control. Use something in memory, like a stream or store it in a String. –  DJ Burb Nov 15 '12 at 20:33
    
yea you will have to drop the user controls like litBox and listView and use a stream –  jordan.peoples Nov 15 '12 at 20:34
    
a listbox will just confuse the user, if they don't need to see it along with everything else you are having a problem with. –  DJ Burb Nov 15 '12 at 20:36
1  
yeah, I agree, I read after my answer you don't need to show data to user. So you should be fine with: string[] x=System.IO.File.ReadAllLines(file); –  Squiffy Nov 15 '12 at 20:37

could use a stream to store the data:

class Test
{

public static void Main()
{
    string path = @"c:\temp\MyTest.txt";

    //Create the file. 
    using (FileStream fs = File.Create(path))
    {
        AddText(fs, "This is some text");
        AddText(fs, "This is some more text,");
        AddText(fs, "\r\nand this is on a new line");
        AddText(fs, "\r\n\r\nThe following is a subset of characters:\r\n");

        for (int i=1;i < 120;i++)
        {
            AddText(fs, Convert.ToChar(i).ToString());

        }
    }

    //Open the stream and read it back. 
    using (FileStream fs = File.OpenRead(path))
    {
        byte[] b = new byte[1024];
        UTF8Encoding temp = new UTF8Encoding(true);
        while (fs.Read(b,0,b.Length) > 0)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(temp.GetString(b));
        }
    }
}

private static void AddText(FileStream fs, string value)
{
    byte[] info = new UTF8Encoding(true).GetBytes(value);
    fs.Write(info, 0, info.Length);
}

}

then you event handler

 privateasyncvoid Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        UnicodeEncoding uniencoding = new UnicodeEncoding();
        string filename = @"c:\Users\exampleuser\Documents\userinputlog.txt";

        byte[] result = uniencoding.GetBytes(UserInput.Text);

        using (FileStream SourceStream = File.Open(filename, FileMode.OpenOrCreate))
        {
            SourceStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.End);
            await SourceStream.WriteAsync(result, 0, result.Length);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
The file has 541207 lines, what should I do :)? –  user1815324 Nov 15 '12 at 20:24
1  
Do you have to display them all to the user? at one time? –  jordan.peoples Nov 15 '12 at 20:25
    
that's not really important. They just need to import the list. No need of seeing it. –  user1815324 Nov 15 '12 at 20:27
    
Then i would defianlty think of some sort of data stream. –  jordan.peoples Nov 15 '12 at 20:28
1  
Why don't you read each line into a List<string>? Then you can use a foreach or linq to find what you are looking for –  DJ Burb Nov 15 '12 at 20:37

Your application becomes unresponsive because it's waiting for the ReadAllLines method to complete and blocks the UI thread. You may want to read files on a separate thread to avoid blocking the UI. I cannot guarantee that the code below will work without errors but it should give you an idea on how to tackle the problem.

First of all, you'll need a method to append an item to the ListBox:

private void AddListBoxItem(string item)
{
    if(!InvokeRequired)
    {
        listBox2.Items.Add(item);
    }
    else
    {
        var callback = new Action<string>(AddListBoxItem);
        Invoke(callback, new object[]{item});
    }
}

The method above checks if it is executed on UI thread and if yes, it simply adds an item to the listBox2.Items collection; if not, it creates a delegate from itself and invokes that delegate on UI thread.

Next, you'll need to move the code that reads the file to another thread and call AddListBoxItem method. For the sake of readability, let's put that into a separate method:

private void AddFileContentsToList(string fileName)
{
    using(var reader = new System.IO.StreamReader(fileName))
    {
        while(!reader.EndOfStream)
        {
            var line = reader.ReadLine();
            AddListBoxItem(line);
        }
    }
}

And now we will call the method on a separate thread:

OpenFileDialog openFileDialog1 = new OpenFileDialog();
openFileDialog1.Filter = "Text Files|*.txt";
openFileDialog1.Title = "Select a Text file";
openFileDialog1.FileName = "";
DialogResult result = openFileDialog1.ShowDialog();
if (result == DialogResult.OK)
{
    var thread = new Thread(AddFileContentsToList);
    thread.Start();
}

Hope this helps!

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