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I have a very simple TCP socket in Node.js. It connects to a device that sends data back in XML format. There is a C# program that does this same trick, but I had to build it in Node.js.

So, when the device sends a message, I'm getting the response about 5 seconds later! Where the C# program gets it 1 or 2 seconds later.

It looks like the 'tcp socket' has a specific polling frequency or some kind of 'wait function'. Is that even possible? Everytime an incoming message displays. It also display's the exit message of "sock.on('close')"

It seems that after 5 seconds the 'server' automaticly closes. See bottom lines "console.log('[LISTENER] Connection paused.');" After that, the incoming message gets displayed correctly.

What is wrong with my code?

// Set Node.js dependencies
var fs = require('fs');
var net = require('net');

// Handle uncaughtExceptions
process.on('uncaughtException', function (err) {
    console.log('Error: ', err);
    // Write to logfile
    var log = fs.createWriteStream('error.log', {'flags': 'a'});
    log.write(err+'\n\r');

});

/*  
    -------------------------------------------------
    Socket TCP : TELLER
    -------------------------------------------------
*/
var oHOST = '10.180.2.210';
var oPORT = 4100;

var client = new net.Socket();
client.connect(oPORT, oHOST, function() {

            console.log('TCP TELLER tells to: ' + oHOST + ':' + oPORT);

            // send xml message here, this goes correct!
            client.write(oMessage);                     
});

// Event handler: incoming data
client.on('data', function(data) {
    // Close the client socket completely
    client.destroy();
});

// Event handler: close connection
client.on('close', function() {
    console.log('[TELLER] Connection paused.');
});     

/*  
    -------------------------------------------------
    Socket TCP : LISTENER
    -------------------------------------------------
*/
var iHOST = '0.0.0.0';
var iPORT = 4102;

// Create a server instance, and chain the listen function to it
var server = net.createServer(function(sock) {

    // We have a connection - a socket object is assigned to the connection automatically
    console.log('TCP LISTENER hearing on: ' + sock.remoteAddress +':'+ sock.remotePort);

    // Event handler: incoming data
    sock.on('data', function(data) {
        console.log('Message: ', ' '+data);
    });

    // Event handler: close connection
    sock.on('close', function(data) {
        console.log('[LISTENER] Connection paused.');
    });

}).listen(iPORT, iHOST);    
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3 Answers 3

client.write() does not always transmit data immediately, it will wait until buffers are full before sending the packet. client.end() will close the socket and flush the buffers.

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client.end() closes the "teller" connection. It does not have effect on the "listen" connection in which I receive the responses from the device. –  Faiawuks Nov 15 '12 at 20:38

You could try this: http://nodejs.org/api/net.html#net_socket_setnodelay_nodelay

Your 5 second delay does seem a bit weird, though.

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It seems that after 5 seconds the 'server' gets automaticly closes. See bottom lines "console.log('[LISTENER] Connection paused.');" After that, the new message is incoming... Know anything about that? –  Faiawuks Nov 15 '12 at 21:13
    
If the client write the data and closes the socket, it's possible that your event handlers on the server get called in any order. But why don't you split client and server into two files and give us something that will actually run to debug? That would probably get you some more useful answers. :) –  rdrey Nov 15 '12 at 21:39
up vote 0 down vote accepted

So within the "TELLER" I had to write "sock.write(data);" inside the "sock.on('data', function(data)" event.

It works now. Thanks Jeremy and rdrey for helping me in the right direction.

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