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the following query executes in 1.6 seconds

SET @num :=0, @current_shop_id := NULL, @current_product_id := NULL;

#this query limits the results of the query within it by row number (so that only 250 products get displayed per store)

SELECT * FROM (

#this query adds row numbers to the query within it

SELECT *, @num := IF( @current_shop_id = shop_id, IF(@current_product_id=product_id,@num,@num+1), 0) AS row_number, @current_shop_id := shop_id AS shop_dummy, @current_product_id := product_id AS product_dummy FROM (

SELECT shop, shops.shop_id AS
shop_id, p1.product_id AS
product_id 
    FROM products p1 LEFT JOIN #this LEFT JOIN gets the favorites count for each product
  (
  SELECT fav3.product_id AS product_id, SUM(CASE 
    WHEN fav3.current = 1 AND fav3.closeted = 1 THEN 1
    WHEN fav3.current = 1 AND fav3.closeted = 0 THEN -1
    ELSE 0
    END) AS favorites_count
    FROM favorites fav3
GROUP BY fav3.product_id 

  ) AS fav4 ON p1.product_id=fav4.product_id
    INNER JOIN sex ON sex.product_id=p1.product_id AND
    sex.sex=0 AND
    sex.date >= SUBDATE(NOW(),INTERVAL 1 DAY) 
    INNER JOIN shops ON shops.shop_id = p1.shop_id
    ORDER BY shop, sex.DATE, product_id
    ) AS testtable

) AS rowed_results WHERE
rowed_results.row_number>=0 AND
rowed_results.row_number<(7)

adding AND shops.shop_id=86 to the final WHERE clause causes the query to execute in 292 seconds:

SET @num :=0, @current_shop_id := NULL, @current_product_id := NULL;

#this query limits the results of the query within it by row number (so that only 250 products get displayed per store)

SELECT * FROM (

#this query adds row numbers to the query within it

SELECT *, @num := IF( @current_shop_id = shop_id, IF(@current_product_id=product_id,@num,@num+1), 0) AS row_number, @current_shop_id := shop_id AS shop_dummy, @current_product_id := product_id AS product_dummy FROM (

SELECT shop, shops.shop_id AS
shop_id, p1.product_id AS
product_id 
    FROM products p1 LEFT JOIN #this LEFT JOIN gets the favorites count for each product
  (
  SELECT fav3.product_id AS product_id, SUM(CASE 
    WHEN fav3.current = 1 AND fav3.closeted = 1 THEN 1
    WHEN fav3.current = 1 AND fav3.closeted = 0 THEN -1
    ELSE 0
    END) AS favorites_count
    FROM favorites fav3
GROUP BY fav3.product_id 

  ) AS fav4 ON p1.product_id=fav4.product_id
    INNER JOIN sex ON sex.product_id=p1.product_id AND
    sex.sex=0 AND
    sex.date >= SUBDATE(NOW(),INTERVAL 1 DAY)
    INNER JOIN shops ON shops.shop_id = p1.shop_id AND
    shops.shop_id=86
    ORDER BY shop, sex.DATE, product_id
    ) AS testtable

) AS rowed_results WHERE
rowed_results.row_number>=0 AND
rowed_results.row_number<(7)

I would have thought limiting the shops table with AND shops.shop_id=86 would reduce execution time. Instead, execution time appears to depend upon the number of rows in the products table with products.shop_id equal to the specified shops.shop_id. There are about 34K rows in the products table with products.shop_id=86, and execution time is 292 seconds. For products.shop_id=50, there are about 28K rows, and execution time is 210 seconds. For products.shop_id=175, there are about 2K rows, and execution time is 2.8 seconds. What is going on?

EXPLAIN EXTENDED for the 1.6 second query is:

id  select_type table   type    possible_keys   key key_len ref rows    filtered    Extra
1   PRIMARY <derived2>  ALL NULL    NULL    NULL    NULL    1203    100.00  Using where
2   DERIVED <derived3>  ALL NULL    NULL    NULL    NULL    1203    100.00  
3   DERIVED sex ALL product_id_2,product_id NULL    NULL    NULL    526846  75.00   Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort
3   DERIVED p1  eq_ref  PRIMARY,shop_id,shop_id_2,product_id,shop_id_3  PRIMARY 4   mydatabase.sex.product_id   1   100.00  
3   DERIVED <derived4>  ALL NULL    NULL    NULL    NULL    14752   100.00  
3   DERIVED shops   eq_ref  PRIMARY PRIMARY 4   mydatabase.p1.shop_id   1   100.00  
4   DERIVED fav3    ALL NULL    NULL    NULL    NULL    15356   100.00  Using temporary; Using filesort

SHOW WARNINGS for this EXPLAIN EXTENDED is

-----+
| Note | 1003 | select `rowed_results`.`shop` AS `shop`,`rowed_results`.`shop_id` AS `shop_id`,`rowed_results`.`product_id` AS `product_id`,`rowed_results`.`row_number` AS `row_number`,`rowed_results`.`shop_dummy` AS `shop_dummy`,`rowed_results`.`product_dummy` AS `product_dummy` from (select `testtable`.`shop` AS `shop`,`testtable`.`shop_id` AS `shop_id`,`testtable`.`product_id` AS `product_id`,(@num:=if(((@current_shop_id) = `testtable`.`shop_id`),if(((@current_product_id) = `testtable`.`product_id`),(@num),((@num) + 1)),0)) AS `row_number`,(@current_shop_id:=`testtable`.`shop_id`) AS `shop_dummy`,(@current_product_id:=`testtable`.`product_id`) AS `product_dummy` from (select `mydatabase`.`shops`.`shop` AS `shop`,`mydatabase`.`shops`.`shop_id` AS `shop_id`,`mydatabase`.`p1`.`product_id` AS `product_id` from `mydatabase`.`products` `p1` left join (select `mydatabase`.`fav3`.`product_id` AS `product_id`,sum((case when ((`mydatabase`.`fav3`.`current` = 1) and (`mydatabase`.`fav3`.`closeted` = 1)) then 1 when ((`mydatabase`.`fav3`.`current` = 1) and (`mydatabase`.`fav3`.`closeted` = 0)) then -(1) else 0 end)) AS `favorites_count` from `mydatabase`.`favorites` `fav3` group by `mydatabase`.`fav3`.`product_id`) `fav4` on(((`mydatabase`.`p1`.`product_id` = `mydatabase`.`sex`.`product_id`) and (`fav4`.`product_id` = `mydatabase`.`sex`.`product_id`))) join `mydatabase`.`sex` join `mydatabase`.`shops` where ((`mydatabase`.`sex`.`sex` = 0) and (`mydatabase`.`p1`.`product_id` = `mydatabase`.`sex`.`product_id`) and (`mydatabase`.`shops`.`shop_id` = `mydatabase`.`p1`.`shop_id`) and (`mydatabase`.`sex`.`date` >= (now() - interval 1 day))) order by `mydatabase`.`shops`.`shop`,`mydatabase`.`sex`.`date`,`mydatabase`.`p1`.`product_id`) `testtable`) `rowed_results` where ((`rowed_results`.`row_number` >= 0) and (`rowed_results`.`row_number` < 7)) |
+------

EXPLAIN EXTENDED for the 292 second query is:

id  select_type table   type    possible_keys   key key_len ref rows    filtered    Extra
1   PRIMARY <derived2>  ALL NULL    NULL    NULL    NULL    36  100.00  Using where
2   DERIVED <derived3>  ALL NULL    NULL    NULL    NULL    36  100.00  
3   DERIVED shops   const   PRIMARY PRIMARY 4       1   100.00  Using temporary; Using filesort
3   DERIVED p1  ref PRIMARY,shop_id,shop_id_2,product_id,shop_id_3  shop_id 4       11799   100.00  
3   DERIVED <derived4>  ALL NULL    NULL    NULL    NULL    14752   100.00  
3   DERIVED sex eq_ref  product_id_2,product_id product_id_2    5   mydatabase.p1.product_id    1   100.00  Using where
4   DERIVED fav3    ALL NULL    NULL    NULL    NULL    15356   100.00  Using temporary; Using filesort

SHOW WARNINGS for this EXPLAIN EXTENDED is

----+ 
| Note | 1003 | select `rowed_results`.`shop` AS `shop`,`rowed_results`.`shop_id` AS `shop_id`,`rowed_results`.`product_id` AS `product_id`,`rowed_results`.`row_number` AS `row_number`,`rowed_results`.`shop_dummy` AS `shop_dummy`,`rowed_results`.`product_dummy` AS `product_dummy` from (select `testtable`.`shop` AS `shop`,`testtable`.`shop_id` AS `shop_id`,`testtable`.`product_id` AS `product_id`,(@num:=if(((@current_shop_id) = `testtable`.`shop_id`),if(((@current_product_id) = `testtable`.`product_id`),(@num),((@num) + 1)),0)) AS `row_number`,(@current_shop_id:=`testtable`.`shop_id`) AS `shop_dummy`,(@current_product_id:=`testtable`.`product_id`) AS `product_dummy` from (select 'shop.nordstrom.com' AS `shop`,'86' AS `shop_id`,`mydatabase`.`p1`.`product_id` AS `product_id` from `mydatabase`.`products` `p1` left join (select `mydatabase`.`fav3`.`product_id` AS `product_id`,sum((case when ((`mydatabase`.`fav3`.`current` = 1) and (`mydatabase`.`fav3`.`closeted` = 1)) then 1 when ((`mydatabase`.`fav3`.`current` = 1) and (`mydatabase`.`fav3`.`closeted` = 0)) then -(1) else 0 end)) AS `favorites_count` from `mydatabase`.`favorites` `fav3` group by `mydatabase`.`fav3`.`product_id`) `fav4` on(((`fav4`.`product_id` = `mydatabase`.`p1`.`product_id`) and (`mydatabase`.`sex`.`product_id` = `mydatabase`.`p1`.`product_id`))) join `mydatabase`.`sex` join `mydatabase`.`shops` where ((`mydatabase`.`sex`.`sex` = 0) and (`mydatabase`.`sex`.`product_id` = `mydatabase`.`p1`.`product_id`) and (`mydatabase`.`p1`.`shop_id` = 86) and (`mydatabase`.`sex`.`date` >= (now() - interval 1 day))) order by 'shop.nordstrom.com',`mydatabase`.`sex`.`date`,`mydatabase`.`p1`.`product_id`) `testtable`) `rowed_results` where ((`rowed_results`.`row_number` >= 0) and (`rowed_results`.`row_number` < 7)) | 
+-----

I am running MySQL client version: 5.1.56. The shops table has a primary index on shop_id:

Action  Keyname Type    Unique  Packed  Column  Cardinality Collation   Null    Comment
 Edit    Drop   PRIMARY BTREE   Yes No  shop_id 163 A

I have analyzed the shop table but this did not help.

I notice that if I remove the LEFT JOIN the difference in execution times drops to 0.12 seconds versus 0.28 seconds.

Cez's solution, namely to use the 1.6-second version of the query and remove irrelevant results by adding rowed_results.shop_dummy=86 to the outer query (as below), executes in 1.7 seconds. This circumvents the problem, but the mystery remains why 292-second query is so slow.

SET @num :=0, @current_shop_id := NULL, @current_product_id := NULL;

#this query limits the results of the query within it by row number (so that only 250 products get displayed per store)

SELECT * FROM (

#this query adds row numbers to the query within it

SELECT *, @num := IF( @current_shop_id = shop_id, IF(@current_product_id=product_id,@num,@num+1), 0) AS row_number, @current_shop_id := shop_id AS shop_dummy, @current_product_id := product_id AS product_dummy FROM (

SELECT shop, shops.shop_id AS
shop_id, p1.product_id AS
product_id 
    FROM products p1 LEFT JOIN #this LEFT JOIN gets the favorites count for each product
  (
  SELECT fav3.product_id AS product_id, SUM(CASE 
    WHEN fav3.current = 1 AND fav3.closeted = 1 THEN 1
    WHEN fav3.current = 1 AND fav3.closeted = 0 THEN -1
    ELSE 0
    END) AS favorites_count
    FROM favorites fav3
GROUP BY fav3.product_id 

  ) AS fav4 ON p1.product_id=fav4.product_id
    INNER JOIN sex ON sex.product_id=p1.product_id AND sex.sex=0
    INNER JOIN shops ON shops.shop_id = p1.shop_id
    WHERE sex.date >= SUBDATE(NOW(),INTERVAL 1 DAY) 


    ORDER BY shop, sex.DATE, product_id
    ) AS testtable

) AS rowed_results WHERE
rowed_results.row_number>=0 AND
rowed_results.row_number<(7) AND
rowed_results.shop_dummy=86;
share|improve this question
1  
What is the output of "EXPLAIN EXTENDED .. <insert sql>" followed by "SHOW WARNINGS"? –  Cez Nov 15 '12 at 20:35
    
…for both versions of the statement? Compare the EXPLAIN outputs to see what's the difference. Also all columns in a single WHERE clause should go into one key. –  feeela Nov 15 '12 at 20:36
    
@Cez @feela thanks for the reminder, I have added EXPLAIN EXTENDED queries to the question. SHOW WARNINGS did not produce any results. –  jela Nov 15 '12 at 21:10
    
@feela does this mean I should put the AND shops.shop_id=86 qualification in the shops INNER JOIN instead of the WHERE clause? That is how I had the query formulated originally, but the execution time was the same. –  jela Nov 15 '12 at 21:11
    
@jela Do you get any change by using p1.shop_id=86, or shops.shop_id=86 in the INNER JOIN? Also, please post the output of SHOW WARNINGS so that the optimised query is available –  Cez Nov 15 '12 at 21:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

After the chat room, and actually creating tables/columns to match the query, I've come up with the following query.

I have started my inner-most query to be on the sex, product (for shop_id) and favorites table. Since you described that ProductX at ShopA = Product ID = 1 but same ProductX at ShopB = Product ID = 2 (example only), each product is ALWAYS unique per shop and never duplicated. That said, I can get the product and shop_id WITH the count of favorites (if any) at this query, yet group on just the product_id .. as shop_id won't change per product I am using MAX(). Since you are always looking by a date of "yesterday" and gender (sex=0 female), I would have the SEX table indexed on ( date, sex, product_id )... I would guess you are not adding 1000's of items every day... Products obviously would have an index on product_id (primary key), and favorites SHOULD have an index on product_id.

From that result (alias "sxFav") we can then do a direct join to the sex and products table by that "Product_ID" to get any additional information you may want, such as name of shop, date product added, product description, etc. This result is then ordered by the shop_id the product is being sold from, date and finally product ID (but you may consider grabbing a description column at inner query and using that as sort-by). This results in alias "PreQuery".

With the order being all proper by shop, we can now add the @MySQLVariable references to get each product assigned a row number similar to how you originally attempted. However, only reset back to 1 when a shop ID changes.

SELECT 
      PreQuery.*,
      @num := IF( @current_shop_id = PreQuery.shop_id, @num +1, 1 ) AS RowPerShop, 
      @current_shop_id := PreQuery.shop_id AS shop_dummy 
   from 
      ( SELECT 
              sxFav.product_id, 
              sxFav.shop_id, 
              sxFav.Favorites_Count
           from 
              ( SELECT 
                      sex.product_id,
                      MAX( p.shop_id ) shop_id,
                      SUM( CASE WHEN F.current = 1 AND F.closeted = 1 THEN 1 
                                WHEN F.current = 1 AND F.closeted = 0 THEN -1 
                                ELSE 0 END ) AS favorites_count 
                   from 
                      sex
                         JOIN products p
                            ON sex.Product_ID = p.Product_ID
                         LEFT JOIN Favorites F 
                            ON sex.product_id = F.product_ID 
                   where 
                          sex.date >= subdate( now(), interval 1 day) 
                      and sex.sex = 0 
                   group by 
                      sex.product_id ) sxFav 

              JOIN sex 
                 ON sxFav.Product_ID = sex.Product_ID

              JOIN products p
                 ON sxFav.Product_ID = p.Product_ID
      order by 
         sxFav.shop_id, 
         sex.date, 
         sxFav.product_id ) PreQuery,

     ( select @num :=0, 
              @current_shop_id := 0 ) as SQLVars 

Now, if you are looking for specific "paging" information (such as 7 entries per shop), wrap the ENTIRE query above into something like...

select * from ( entire query above ) where RowPerShop between 1 and 7

(or between 8 and 14, 15 and 21, etc as needed) or even

RowPerShop between RowsPerPage*PageYouAreShowing and RowsPerPage*(PageYouAreShowing +1)
share|improve this answer
    
I've been tinkering with this for a while. This query's MUCH faster than mine: 0.13 secs vs. 3.4 secs for my original query (on a somewhat larger dataset than I was using previously). I am confused about the JOIN sex ON sxFav.Product_ID = sex.Product_ID clause. Adding this clause appears to retrieve unintended results, because the intent of the query is to retrieve only results for sex.sex=0, but that clause will also add rows with sex.sex=1, as long as there is a match for sxFav.Product_ID = sex.Product_ID. I verified that this added 11 extra rows not returned by my original query. –  jela Nov 25 '12 at 21:44
    
removing JOIN sex ON sxFav.Product_ID = sex.Product_ID from your query causes it to retrieve the same number of results as my original query (no results with sex.sex=1). I'm also confused about JOIN products p ON sxFav.Product_ID = p.Product_ID, since this JOIN already takes place when creating sxFav, so it seems I could just SELECT relevant columns from the products table within the sxFav table. Removing this clause doesn't appear to change the execution time. I might be misunderstanding what these two clauses are doing. –  jela Nov 25 '12 at 21:48
    
@jela, continue in a chat room? I'll follow. –  DRapp Nov 25 '12 at 21:49
    
I have created chat room at chat.stackoverflow.com/rooms/info/20085/… –  jela Nov 25 '12 at 21:52
    
@jela, here's a link for the complex sqlvariables question I mentioned to you in chat... stackoverflow.com/questions/9057820/… –  DRapp Nov 26 '12 at 0:30

You should move the shops.shop_id=86 to the JOIN condition for shops. No reason to put it outside the JOIN, you run the risk of MySQL JOINing first, then filtering. A JOIN can do the same job the a WHERE clause does, especially if you are not referencing other tables.

....
INNER JOIN shops ON shops.shop_id = p1.shop_id AND shops.shop_id=86
....

Same thing with the sex join:

...
INNER JOIN shops ON shops.shop_id = p1.shop_id
AND sex.date >= SUBDATE(NOW(),INTERVAL 1 DAY)
...

Derived tables are great, but they have no indexes on them. Usually this doesn't matter since they are generally in RAM. But between filtering and sorting with no indexes, things can add up.

Note that in the second query that take much longer, the table processing order changes. The shop table is at the top in the slow query and the p1 table retrieves 11799 rows instead of 1 row in the fast query. It also doesn't use the primary key any more. That's likely where your problem is.

3   DERIVED p1  eq_ref  PRIMARY,shop_id,shop_id_2,product_id,shop_id_3  PRIMARY 4   mydatabase.sex.product_id   1   100.00  

3   DERIVED p1  ref PRIMARY,shop_id,shop_id_2,product_id,shop_id_3  shop_id 4       11799   100.00  
share|improve this answer
    
I changed the INNER JOIN conditions and removed the WHERE clause. The query executed in 283 seconds. I am wondering how I can force the slow query to use the primary key properly. –  jela Nov 16 '12 at 3:11
    
I updated the original question with your recommended change to the JOIN condition. Also I observed that query execution time appears to depend upon the number of rows in the products table with products.shop_id equal to the specified shops.shop_id. There are about 34K rows in the products table with products.shop_id=86, and execution time is 292 seconds. For products.shop_id=50, there are about 28K rows, and execution time is 210 seconds. For products.shop_id=175, there are about 2K rows, and execution time is 2.8 seconds. I'm not sure how to modify the query to correct this behavior. –  jela Nov 16 '12 at 17:18
    
With that drastic difference in speed for the same query, my first guess would be your sort_buffer_size is too small. MySQL has drastic performance drop off when that is not large enough. –  Brent Baisley Nov 16 '12 at 18:00

Judging by the discussion, the query planner is performing badly when specifying the shop at a lower level.

Add rowed_results.shop_dummy=86 to the outer query to get the results that you are looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
This solves the problem by employing the outer query to eliminate irrelevant results returned by the inner query. I'll leave the question open for the time being in the hope that someone can suggest a reformulation of the inner query that returns only the required results, and executes more efficiently than my 292-second version. –  jela Nov 16 '12 at 2:25

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