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So I'm having an issue reading a text file into my program. Here is the code:

     try{
        InputStream fis=new FileInputStream(targetsFile);
        BufferedReader br=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(fis));

        //while(br.readLine()!=null){
        for(int i=0;i<100;i++){
            String[] words=br.readLine().split(" ");
            int targetX=Integer.parseInt(words[0]);
            int targetY=Integer.parseInt(words[1]);
            int targetW=Integer.parseInt(words[2]);
            int targetH=Integer.parseInt(words[3]);
            int targetHits=Integer.parseInt(words[4]);
            Target a=new Target(targetX, targetY, targetW, targetH, targetHits);
            targets.add(a);
        }
        br.close();
    }
    catch(Exception e){
        System.err.println("Error: Target File Cannot Be Read");
    }

The file I am reading from is 100 lines of arguments. If I use a for loop it works perfectly. If I use the while statement (the one commented out above the for loop) it stops at 50. There is a possibility that a user can run the program with a file that has any number of lines, so my current for loop implementation won't work.

Why does the line while(br.readLine()!=null) stop at 50? I checked the text file and there is nothing that would hang it up.

I don't get any errors from the try-catch when I use the while loop so I am stumped. Anyone have any ideas?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You're calling br.readLine() a second time inside the loop.
Therefore, you end up reading two lines each time you go around.

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Thank you! I definitely should have noticed this. Do you know what a workaround would be? –  billg118 Nov 15 '12 at 20:45
2  
The ((line = br.readLine()) != null) syntax is allowed in Java, right? –  jpm Nov 15 '12 at 20:45
2  
@jpm: Yes; that's the best way to do this. (although I like to put the null first to make it clearer) –  SLaks Nov 15 '12 at 20:49
    
@SLaks I agree, yoda conditions are safer, but I just can't get used to writing them :) –  jpm Nov 15 '12 at 20:50
    
@jpm: I don't mean for safety (Java has a compiler error for that); I mean to make it clear that there is an assignment there. –  SLaks Nov 15 '12 at 20:51
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also very comprehensive...

try{
    InputStream fis=new FileInputStream(targetsFile);
    BufferedReader br=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(fis));

    for (String line = br.readLine(); line != null; line = br.readLine()) {
       System.out.println(line);
    }

    br.close();
}
catch(Exception e){
    System.err.println("Error: Target File Cannot Be Read");
}
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Thank you to SLaks and jpm for their help. It was a pretty simple error that I simply did not see.

As SLaks pointed out, br.readLine() was being called twice each loop which made the program only get half of the values. Here is the fixed code:

try{
        InputStream fis=new FileInputStream(targetsFile);
        BufferedReader br=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(fis));
        String words[]=new String[5];
        String line=null;
        while((line=br.readLine())!=null){
            words=line.split(" ");
            int targetX=Integer.parseInt(words[0]);
            int targetY=Integer.parseInt(words[1]);
            int targetW=Integer.parseInt(words[2]);
            int targetH=Integer.parseInt(words[3]);
            int targetHits=Integer.parseInt(words[4]);
            Target a=new Target(targetX, targetY, targetW, targetH, targetHits);
            targets.add(a);
        }
        br.close();
    }
    catch(Exception e){
        System.err.println("Error: Target File Cannot Be Read");
    }

Thanks again! You guys are great!

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