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I am new to verilog and I am working on verilg code that defines two modules. The first module calculates the mod of 2 numbers and the second uses the result to do some operation on it.

The result was wrong and has alot of don't care values because the same clk was used in both modules. Any suggestion please for synchronisation.

The mod module

module mod(m,a,b);
  input  [15:0] a,b;
  output [15:0] m;

  reg [31:0] mod;
  reg [31:0] mul;

  integer i;

  always @* begin
    mul = a*b;
    mod = 32'h80008000;
    for(i=0;i<16;i=i+1) begin
      if(mul > mod) begin
        mul = mul - mod;
        mod = mod >> 1;
      end 
      else begin
        mod = mod >> 1;
      end
    end
    assign m=mul[15:0];
 endmodule 

Part of the top module:

initial begin
  keyp <= 2'b10;
  shift <= 1'b0;
end

 always @(posedge clk) begin
   if(load)
     case (keyp)
       2'b10: begin 
          key[127:64] <= {k1,k0};
          keyp        <= 2'b01;
       end
       2'b01: begin
         key[63:0] <= {k1,k0};
         keyp      <= 2'b00;
         shift     <= 1'b1;
       end
     //default: keyp <=2'b00;
     endcase
   else if (shift) begin
     //shift key for first round
     temp[24:0]    <= key[127:103];
     key[127:25]   <= key[102:0];
     key [24:0]    <= temp [24:0];
     shift         <= 1'b0;
   end
 end

 assign w1[2*SIZE-1:SIZE]   = d1+key[2*SIZE-1:SIZE];
 assign w1[3*SIZE-1:2*SIZE] = d2+key[3*SIZE-1:2*SIZE];

 mod mod1( w1[SIZE-1:0],        d0, key[SIZE-1:0]       );
 mod mod2( w1[4*SIZE-1:3*SIZE], d3, key[4*SIZE-1:3*SIZE]);
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2 Answers 2

Assigning to the same value multiple times with blocking assignments is perfectly valid Verilog. Even having the same term appear on both sides is fine, provided it's been assigned at least once prior to that.

The code here is incomplete but the problem appears to be that the code is assigning to 'key' in multiple places. Both as the output of the mod instances and inside the clocked block. Anytime these two 'disagree' about the value of key it's going to been seen as an X. X in addition to representing unknown also reflects contention where two different assignments conflict.

Since I'm not sure what this code is meant to do (seems to be some sort of encryption) I can't offer a fix but you need to separate the assignments to key.

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Another answer, section 2 explains that it is not ok, to have the same term on both sides of an assignment in a combinatorial block ;) –  Morgan Feb 19 '13 at 22:30

x's are referred to as do not cares in casex statements or Karnaugh maps, here they represent unknown values. Unknown values can come from a value not being initialised (reset) or multiple (conflicting) drivers.

The mod module contains this section of code:

always @* begin
  mul = a*b;
  mod = 32'h80008000;
  for(i=0;i<16;i=i+1) begin
    if(mul > mod) begin
      mul = mul - mod;
      mod = mod >> 1;
    end 
    else begin
      mod = mod >> 1;
    end
  end

always @* is a combinatorial block, you assign mul multiple times only the last assignment will have any effect.

The use of a for loop here makes it look like you are trying to reuse variables, as you would in c. Remember that we are describing hardware and that the value is intended to exist somewhere as flip flops or wires between modules and can only hold a single value in any given clock cycle.

In the combinatorial block you have mul = mul - mod; that is mul defining itself this will not work, you need to add a flip flop to break the loop.

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