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My current script does the following;

It takes integer as a command line argument and starts from 1 to N , it checks whether the numbers are divisible by three,five or both of them. It simply prints out X for three, Y for five and XY for three,five. If the command line argument is empty.

I am having this error "Too many arguments at line 11,15 and 19".

Here is the code:

#!/bin/bash

if [ (statement) ]; then
    for ...
    do
        if [ statement ]; then
            echo "s1"
        elif [ statement2 ]; then
            echo "s2"
        elif [ statement3 ]
        then
            echo "s3"
        else
            echo "$i"
        fi
    done
elif [ statement ]
then
    for ...
    do
        if [ statement ]
        then
            echo ""
        elif [ statement2 ]
        then
            echo ""
        elif [ statement3 ]
        then
            echo ""
        else
            echo "$i"
        fi
    done
else
    echo ""
fi
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Note that [ is actually synonym for the test builtin in shell (try which [ in your terminal), and not a conditional syntax like other languages, so you cannot do:

if [ [$i % 3] -eq 0 ]; then

Moreover, always make sure that there is at least one space between [, ], and the variables that comprise the logical condition check in between them.

The syntax for evaluating an expression such as modulo is enclosure by $((...)), and the variable names inside need not be prefixed by $:

remainder=$((i % 3))
if [ $remainder -eq 0 ]; then
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Thank you, I just leanred [ meant test in shell. I put space between them normally , but tried without space also :) –  Yesilmen Nov 15 '12 at 20:53
    
You say variables should not be prefixed within $((...)), but both $(($i%3)) and $((i%3)) seem to return the same. –  jvivenot Nov 15 '12 at 20:57
    
In bash, [ is a builtin, as shown by help [, and not as written here a link to the test command. –  gniourf_gniourf Nov 15 '12 at 21:01
    
@gniourf_gniourf help [ prints This is a synonym for the "test" builtin, at least in bash. –  sampson-chen Nov 15 '12 at 21:07
    
Yes, you read properly: builtin !!! It's not the same as the command [ and test. which looks for commands in your path... –  gniourf_gniourf Nov 15 '12 at 21:12
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You should probably use something like :

if [ $(($i % 3)) -eq 0 ]

instead of

if [ $i % 3 -eq 0 ]
if [ [$i % 3] -eq 0 ]
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Thank you, I though I've tried this method also, but I did it like $((i%3)) silly me. :) –  Yesilmen Nov 15 '12 at 20:52
2  
Actually, as @sampson-chen pointed out in his solution, $((i%3)) works. –  jvivenot Nov 15 '12 at 20:56
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Your script could be greatly simplified. For example:

#!/bin/sh

n=0
while test $(( ++n )) -le ${1:-20}; do
  t=$n
  expr $n % 3 > /dev/null || { printf Uc; t=; }
  expr $n % 5 > /dev/null || { printf Bes; t=; }
  echo $t
done

gives slightly different error messages if the argument is not an integer, but otherwise behaves the same.

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