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What is the preferred way of doing the conversion using PIL/Numpy/SciPy today?

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I've read this question stackoverflow.com/questions/3228361/… and it gives a broken link to a color.py which is missing from scipy trunk. –  Antony Hatchkins Nov 15 '12 at 20:50
    
Yes, I've found this file deep in the scipy git repository, but I can't beleive there's no standard way of doing such a simple thing using such powerful tools. –  Antony Hatchkins Nov 15 '12 at 20:58
    
And yes, I know about code.google.com/p/python-colormath lib, and yet I can't understand why didn't it make its way into any of those three tools. –  Antony Hatchkins Nov 15 '12 at 20:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Since 2010 when the linked question was asked the corresponding code moved from scipy to a separate toolkit: http://scikit-image.org/

So here's the code I was actually looking for:

from skimage import io, color
rgb = io.imread(filename)
lab = color.rgb2lab(rgb)

It should also be noted that due to Lab nature srgb->lab conversion depends on an additional parameter: whitepoint, eg:
   • Photoshop uses a white point called D50 (which is a standard for icc)
   • OpenCV and skimage use D65 (which is a standard for srgb).
   • default Matlab implementation uses D50 (it is capable of using others),

This nice FAQ explains it this way:

You should use D65 unless you have a good reason to use something else.
The print industry commonly uses D50 and photography commonly uses D55.
These represent compromises between the conditions of indoor (tungsten) and daylight viewing.

You can tell which whitepoint you're dealing with by converting RGB (0,0,255) to Lab:
   • D50 would give you (30, 68, -112)
   • D55                         (30, 73, -110)
   • D65                         (32, 79, -108)

The numbers after 'D' correspond to (internally) used color temperature of white point: D50 = 5003 K (bluish), D65 = 6504 K (yellowish)

I'm grateful to Alex and Roman for their answers because they pointed me into the right direction.

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In skimage you can change white point to D50 or something else stackoverflow.com/a/22968744/2863099 –  Pylyp Apr 10 at 7:00

Edit: Sample pyCMS code:

from PIL import Image
import pyCMS
im = Image.open(...)
im2 = pyCMS.profileToProfile(im, pyCMS.createProfile("sRGB"), pyCMS.createProfile("LAB"))

Edit: Pillow, the PIL fork, seems to have pyCMS built in.

You might use pyCMS (http://www.cazabon.com/pyCMS/) which works with PIL images.

If speed is not a factor, use python-colormath (http://code.google.com/p/python-colormath/).

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pyCMS deals with ICC profiles, color spaces are "side-effect". I asked for a one-liner. –  Antony Hatchkins Nov 16 '12 at 4:29
    
Yes, I mentioned python-colormath in my third comment to the question. –  Antony Hatchkins Nov 16 '12 at 4:30
    
No, it is not a matrix. –  Antony Hatchkins Nov 16 '12 at 4:31
    
Anthony, however you are correct that it is not a single matrix, because the xyz->lab transform is defined differently in different ranges of xyz. Well, I don't think there's a one-liner, short of porting the relevant part of colormath to numpy first :) –  Alex I Nov 16 '12 at 8:21
    
The question is not if there is a one-liner (two were given in my comments to the question) but rather why neither of those two found its way into PIL/numpy/scipy or if there're some better alternatives. –  Antony Hatchkins Nov 16 '12 at 14:01

I've found this code in adobe cookbook and adapted for python. It doesn't require any third-party modules or components:

def rgb2lab ( inputColor ) :

   num = 0
   RGB = [0, 0, 0]

   for value in inputColor :
       value = float(value) / 255

       if value > 0.04045 :
           value = ( ( value + 0.055 ) / 1.055 ) ** 2.4
       else :
           value = value / 12.92

       RGB[num] = value * 100
       num = num + 1

   XYZ = [0, 0, 0,]

   X = RGB [0] * 0.4124 + RGB [1] * 0.3576 + RGB [2] * 0.1805
   Y = RGB [0] * 0.2126 + RGB [1] * 0.7152 + RGB [2] * 0.0722
   Z = RGB [0] * 0.0193 + RGB [1] * 0.1192 + RGB [2] * 0.9505
   XYZ[ 0 ] = round( X, 4 )
   XYZ[ 1 ] = round( Y, 4 )
   XYZ[ 2 ] = round( Z, 4 )

   XYZ[ 0 ] = float( XYZ[ 0 ] ) / 95.047         # ref_X =  95.047   Observer= 2°, Illuminant= D65
   XYZ[ 1 ] = float( XYZ[ 1 ] ) / 100.0          # ref_Y = 100.000
   XYZ[ 2 ] = float( XYZ[ 2 ] ) / 108.883        # ref_Z = 108.883

   num = 0
   for value in XYZ :

       if value > 0.008856 :
           value = value ** ( 0.3333333333333333 )
       else :
           value = ( 7.787 * value ) + ( 16 / 116 )

       XYZ[num] = value
       num = num + 1

   Lab = [0, 0, 0]

   L = ( 116 * XYZ[ 1 ] ) - 16
   a = 500 * ( XYZ[ 0 ] - XYZ[ 1 ] )
   b = 200 * ( XYZ[ 1 ] - XYZ[ 2 ] )

   Lab [ 0 ] = round( L, 4 )
   Lab [ 1 ] = round( a, 4 )
   Lab [ 2 ] = round( b, 4 )

   return Lab

I hope this is will be useful for you

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It doesn't directly answer the question: I needed a one-liner. But it is helpful anyway. Thanks! –  Antony Hatchkins Apr 17 '13 at 18:21
    
Although I would reference the original easyrgb site instead of the adobe cookbook. –  Antony Hatchkins Apr 17 '13 at 18:22
    
Your code is not quite pythonic should I say. At the very least I'd use enumerate instead of the num variable and 1/3. instead of 0.3333333333333333 –  Antony Hatchkins Apr 17 '13 at 18:32

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