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Trying to come up with a query that will find rows that contain 4, 5 or 6 consecutive numbers.

For example: Table MyNumbers contains 6 columns of number combinations from 1 to 52.

Cloumn names are: nbr1 nbr2 nbr3 nbr4 nbr5 nbr6

Row one contains: 1 5 43 50 51 52

Row two contains: 41 42 43 44 45 52 <----- five consecutive numbers

Row three contains: 8 14 38 39 42 50

Row four contains: 1 2 3 4 15 29 <----- four consecutive numbers

Row five contains: 8 14 24 36 48 51

Row six contains: 1 2 3 4 5 6 <----- six consecutive numbers

Need to come up with a query that would find rows 2, 4 and 6 based on containing a result set where there were 4 or more consecutive numbers in that row.

I created a database that contains all possible combinations for a 6 numbers out of 52 (1 to 52). What I would like to do is eliminate rows that have four or more numbers that are consecutive. So I am not sure above would do the trick. For those that asked, I am using sql server 2008 R2.

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1  
Which rdbms are you using(f.e. MySql,Oracle,Sql-Server)? Tag it accordingly with version. – Tim Schmelter Nov 15 '12 at 21:13
    
does a range of consecutive numbers need to start in the first column? or would 5 11 12 13 14 19 be acceptable? Also is it guaranteed that the columns are sorted ascending as you have in your examples? Is the schema flexible or are you stuck with this one? (Might find it easier to have the collection of values in a sub table) – Mikeb Nov 15 '12 at 21:15
    
Are you trying to statistically mine the Illinois Lotto 6/52 historical wins? – RichardTheKiwi Nov 15 '12 at 21:49
    
I created a database that contains all possible combinations for a 6 numbers out of 52 lottery (1 to 52). What I would like to do is eliminate rows that have four or more numbers that are consecutive. – user1824871 Nov 16 '12 at 20:06

Assuming the numbers are always increasing, and not repeating

select *
  from mynumbers
 where nbr4 - nbr1 = 3
    or nbr5 - nbr2 = 3
    or nbr6 - nbr3 = 3

I took the liberty of simplifying it to the fact that for a series of 6 consecutive numbers, there must already be a series of 4 consecutive numbers.

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I created a database that contains all possible combinations for a 6 numbers out of 52 (1 to 52). What I would like to do is eliminate rows that have four or more numbers that are consecutive. So I am not sure above would do the trick. For those that asked, I am using sql server 2008R2. – user1824871 Nov 16 '12 at 20:07
    
Please confirm or deny the assumptions, which you haven't done. You seem to have confirmed that the numbers don't repeat, but are they always placed in increasing order from nbr1 to nbr6? To eliminate them instead of showing them, just put a bit NOT around it, i.e. NOT (nbr4 - nbr1 = 3 or nbr5 - nbr2 = 3 or nbr6 - nbr3 = 3) – RichardTheKiwi Nov 16 '12 at 20:49
    
I have a table that contains 2,0358,520 rows which are all possible 6 digit combnations using the number 1 thru 52. There are no number combinations that repeat. I'm looking to create a query that will find the rows that contain 4 or more numbers that are consecutive. So if a row contains the numbers 4,14,15,16,17,52 I want to find it. If a row contains 5,12,23,36,45,52 i do not want it. – user1824871 Nov 17 '12 at 3:13
    
Then the answer is exactly what you are looking for. The assumption being that the combination of (4,14,15,16,17,52) will be in exactly that order and not (52,4,16,15,14,17). – RichardTheKiwi Nov 17 '12 at 7:48
    
You are correct, when I run your query it looks to produce the results set that I need. Thank you. – user1824871 Nov 19 '12 at 16:57

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