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I'm using GPars' fork/join. When I throw an exception after calling forkOffChild, it gets buried.

For example:

def myRecursiveClosure = { boolean top ->
    try {
        if (!top) {
            throw new RuntimeException('child had a problem')
        } else {
            forkOffChild(false)
        }
    } catch (Exception exc) {
        println 'Exception handled internally'
        throw exc
    }
}

try {
     GParsPool.withPool {
         GParsPool.runForkJoin(true, myRecursiveClosure)
    }
} catch (Exception exc) {
     println 'Exception handled externally'
     throw exc
}

Here, I set a flag so I know the closure has been called recursively. Then, I throw an exception, which gets caught 'internally', but the re-throw is never caught 'externally'. So I am not aware that the forked child failed.

I tried the exception handler also, but it doesn't seem to get called either.

Is this expected behavior, or am I doing something wrong? Are there any strategies to help with this? I can't have the child silently fail.

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The important piece here is that forkOffChild() doesn't wait for the child to run. It merely schedules it for execution. So you cannot expect the forkOffChild() method to propagate exceptions from the child, since they are likely to happen long after the parent has returned from the forkOffChild() method.

Typically, however, a parent is interested in the outcome of the child computations, so it at some point after forking off collects the results using the getChildrenResults() method. This gives you back a list of calculated values or re-throws potential exceptions.

This snippet shows a minimal change to get the expected behavior:

   try {
        if (!top) {
            throw new RuntimeException('child had a problem')
        } else {
            forkOffChild(false)
            println childrenResults
        }
    } catch (Exception exc) {
        println 'Exception handled internally'
        throw exc
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I and looked at your examples, Vaclav, and saw this. –  user1373467 Nov 16 '12 at 13:46
    
Ugh got timed out there. Your explanation makes sense. I tried it and it worked. I'm assuming this is the right approach for async functions also. After testing, I can see that parallel collections do throw it up to the caller, I assume they are doing this sort of 'get result' internally. They seem to eventually die, I guess there's no good way to instantly kill all the threads though if one gets an exception? –  user1373467 Nov 16 '12 at 15:10
    
Well, there's a related problem here... whenBound doesn't throw an exception up like a get() does, and the closure code doesn't get called. How do you handle exceptions with async functions and whenBound? If you like, I'll post a separate question. Thanks! –  user1373467 Nov 16 '12 at 16:49
    
Yes, parallel collections do not cancel ongoing calculations, if an exception occurs. –  Vaclav Pech Nov 17 '12 at 19:53
    
An asynchronous function will bind the exception to the returned promise and so get() will re-throw it and whenBound() will pass it to the handler: result.whenBound{if (it instanceOf Exception) ... } –  Vaclav Pech Nov 17 '12 at 19:56
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