Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I'm pulling some information out of a database and I need to map it to my model's properties. My first attempt at this yielded a large switch statement which is following an obvious pattern. I am wondering if this fragile code can be expressed in a more dynamic fashion.

foreach (AttributeValue attributeValue in attributeValues)
{
    string label = attributes.First(a => a.ID == attributeValue.AttributeID).Name;
    switch (attributeValue.AttributeName)
    {
        case "TaskSequence":
            TaskSequenceLabel = label;
            break;
        case "TaskStatus":
            TaskStatusLabel = label;
            break;
        case "InstallChangeNumber":
            InstallChangeNumberLabel = label;
            break;
        case "InstallChangeStart":
            InstallChangeStartLabel = label;
            break;
        case "InstallChangeEnd":
            InstallChangeEndLabel = label;
            break;
        case "SubmittedDateTime":
            SubmittedDateTimeLabel = label;
            break;
        case "InstalledDateTime":
            InstalledDateTimeLabel = label;
            break;
    }
}

Basically what I am thinking is "Map labels to properties which have the label's value + "Label""

share|improve this question
1  
Is there a reason you're not using something like NHibernate or Entity Framework? –  Dave Zych Nov 15 '12 at 21:35
    
We partially use NHibernate. It is used for new code, but I still have to work with technical debt in some areas of our project, unfortunately. –  Sean Anderson Nov 15 '12 at 21:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do that with reflection:

foreach (AttributeValue attributeValue in attributeValues)
{
    string label = attributes.First(a => a.ID == attributeValue.AttributeID).Name;
    string propertyName = attributeValue.AttributeName + "Label";
    PropertyInfo pi = GetType().GetProperty(propertyName, BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);
    // check for null, if it is possible that property not exists
    pi.SetValue(this, label, null);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect! Thank you :) –  Sean Anderson Nov 15 '12 at 21:46

You can store the labels in a dictionary and retrieve the one you need via its respective key. This can be viewed as a very simple implementation of the Strategy Pattern.

var labels = new Dictionary<string, Label>();
labels.Add("TaskSequence", TaskSequenceLabel);
labels.Add("TaskStatus", TaskStatusLabel);
// etc.

attributeValues.ForEach(value => {
    string label = attributes.First(a => a.ID == value.AttributeID).Name;
    labels[value.AttributeName] = label;
});

If you need it in multiple places you can refactor it into its own class:

public class MyLabels
{
    public Dictionary<string, Label> _labels =
                  new Dictionary<string< Label>();

    public MyLabels() {
        _labels.Add("TaskSequence", TaskSequenceLabel);
        _labels.Add("TaskStatus", TaskStatusLabel);
        // etc.
    }

    public Label Named(string name) {
        return _labels[name];
    }
}

// Usage:
var labels = new MyLabels();
attributeValues.ForEach(value => {
    string label = attributes.First(a => a.ID == value.AttributeID).Name;
    labels.Named(value.AttributeName) = label;
});
share|improve this answer

A reflection-only solution will of course do the trick.

I would, however, evaluate the use of a custom attribute with which you could decorate the interested members. Something that you could use to specify the attribute name you're currently switching on.

Looks like a more robust solution to me than to only use reflection, because it's independent of the TaskSequence -> TaskSequenceLabel convention-based mapping.

With a reflection-only approach, should someone change the name of TaskSequence, figuring out why things don't work anymore could be more difficult than it is necessary. If you have an attribute, however, you simply don't care. You do care, of course, if the name of the field in the db gets changed.

EDIT

Let me add some code to clarify (pseudo-code actually, I don't have a copy of Visual Studio here). I will assume it's properties you want to populate.

// here's the custom attribute. Ok, should probably be sealed and bla bla bla.

public class MapToAttribute : Attribute {
  readonly string _fieldName;

  public MapToAttribute(string fieldName) {
    _fieldName = fieldName;
  }
}

// here's your model
public class SomeModel {
  [MapTo("TaskSequence")]
  public int TaskSequence { get; set; }
}

// here's how you figure out which property have the MapTo attribute
from p in typeof(SomeModel).GetProperties() where p.IsDefined(typeof(MapToAttribute))

The rest is left as an exercise for the reader. PropertyInfo.SetValue and friends.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.