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I have a method that is exposed using interface in the business logic layer. It is as follows:

  public interface IMyWorkingClass
  {
       IEnumerable<dynamic> GetSomeList(); 
  }

  public class MyWorkingClass : IMyWorkingClass
  {
      public IEnumerable<dynamic> GetSomeList()
      {  
           dynamic foos = new List<dynamic>();

           dynamic item = new ExpandoObject();

           item.PropOne = (new Foo()).FooPropertyOne;

           item.PropTwo = (new Bar()).BarPropertyOne;

           foos.Add(item);

           return foos;

      }
  }  

  public class Foo
  {
      public int FooId{get;set;}
      public string FooPropertyOne{get;set;}
      public string FooPropertyTwo{get;set;}

  }

  public class Bar 
  {
      public int BarId{get;set;}
      public string BarPropertyOne{get;set;}
      public string BarPropertyTwo{get;set;}

  }

There are a lot of different opinions/preferences out there about dynamic itself. I find them useful. One of my friends said dynamics are good but the way they are used above are not. The argument presented was that the compiler wont catch the things changed on dynamic object. I think the unit tests will be able to catch those. So I disagreed. What is your expert opinion? Thanks in advance :)

Update

Here's bit clearer (hopefully) code:

public interface IMyWorkingClass
{
    IEnumerable<dynamic> GetListOfClassesForStudentDynamicReturn();
    IEnumerable<StudentClassInfo> GetListOfClassesForStudentStaticReturn();

}

public class MyWorkingClass : IMyWorkingClass
{
    public IEnumerable<dynamic> GetListOfClassesForStudentDynamicReturn(Student student)
    {
        dynamic listOfClasses = new List<dynamic>();



         // repository pattern is used in DAL  
        var datafromDB = (StudentCollegeClassRepo.GetQueryable(x=>x.StudentId==student.StudentId)
                          .select(item => new {
                              item.CollegeClassId
                              ,item.CollegeClass.CollegeClassName
                              ,item.IsEnabledForStudent
                          }).ToList();

        foreach (var item in datafromDB)
        {
            dynamic classWithStudent = new ExpandoObject();
            classWithStudent.CollegeClassId = item.CollegeClassId;
            classWithStudent.CollegeClassName = item.CollegeClassName;
            classWithStudent.IsEnabledForStudent = item.IsEnabledForStudent;
            listOfClasses.Add(studentWithClass);
        }


        return listOfClasses;

    }

    public IEnumerable<StudentClassInfo> GetListOfClassesForStudentStaticReturn(Student student)
    {
         // repository pattern is used in DAL  
        var datafromDB = (StudentCollegeClassRepo.GetQueryable(x=>x.StudentId==student.StudentId)
                          .select(item => new StudentClassInfo {
                              CollegeClassId = item.CollegeClassId
                              ,CollegeClassName = item.CollegeClass.CollegeClassName
                              ,IsEnabledForStudent = item.IsEnabledForStudent
                          }).ToList();


        return datafromDB;

    }
}
// this class is like a viewmodel
public class StudentClassInfo
{
    public int CollegeClassId { get; set; }
    public string CollegeClassName { get; set; }
    public bool IsEnabledForStudent { get; set; }
}

public class Student
{
    public int StudentId { get; set; }
    public string StudentName { get; set; }
}

public class StudentCollegeClass
{
    public int StudentId { get; set; }
    public int CollegeClassId { get; set; }
    public bool IsEnabledForStudent { get; set; }
}

public class CollegeClass
{
    public int CollegeClassId { get; set; }
    public string CollegeClassName { get; set; }


}

Hopefully I made things little clearer now. So,method with dynamic return is ok or create a static type and have that returned instead? I am also learning how to ask question properly here.. Thanks for your patience and awesome replies :)

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closed as not constructive by Servy, Peter O., dove, Jean-François Corbett, Dominik Honnef Nov 16 '12 at 8:28

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2  
IMHO Yes, I would never consume such an object personally. Dynamic can be useful for some COM-interaction and in other very limited scenarios but depending on what you are building I would try to stay away from it literally as much as possible and rather work on building and designing coherent data structures that enable application logic. –  Quintin Robinson Nov 15 '12 at 22:11
    
@QuintinRobinson: It's also good for building some really evil code demos :) –  Jon Skeet Nov 15 '12 at 22:14
    
"dynamics are good" - dynamics are amoral - they can be used for good or evil (as Jon appears to have first-hand experience of). –  D Stanley Nov 15 '12 at 22:16
    
@JonSkeet Oh don't I know hehe ;) –  Quintin Robinson Nov 15 '12 at 22:19
    
@JonSkeet Sir, do you have an example for it? thanks. –  Yogiraj Nov 15 '12 at 22:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Despite what Skeet says :) I'll add some thoughts here.

If you start down the path of using Dynamics, you must shift your thinking. You don't know what your object is, you only care about it what it can do.

You find yourself not needing interfaces rather quickly - and then you ask yourself "WTF am I doing anyway?". Which is always a great question to ask.

And then a shift happens as you start writing more tests to cover up the loss of a compiler check - you start writing methods a bit more clearly. You start relying on Factories and other classes to impose logic on top of these little bits of amorphous dynamic goo.

It's incredibly freeing if you consider the mental shift. For instance you have a "MyWorkingClass" that does something on top of Foo/Bar. If that was a fulfillment class called "Warehouse" that had some methods called "CheckInvetoryOf(dynamic item)" - things start to make a bit more sense.

In the real world you would send in an interface here - probably ITrackable or something - that exposes a very very small subset of what could be used. It would work, but what if you changed your approach later and wanted the Warehouse to ship digital goods - something like downloads?

Your Warehouse class was probably fashioned after a brick and mortar - and making the shift to sending out digital downloads... OH NO!

But if you use dynamics - it's easy. You could simply ask if the item has is an IDigitalGood (for instance) and handle it nicely.

So - the code you wrote is, yes, confusing. If you spend some time with Dynamic languages it will afford you the mental shift to make it not so confusing.

Oh - in terms of "Architecturally Wrong" to do what you did... who knows. If it's confusing, that's not good. If it makes testing hard - that's triple not good. If you get laughed at, you might be on the right track :)

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This is really a super answer. I need to think on this. I added a better example in the question in case if you have better ideas. –  Yogiraj Nov 16 '12 at 4:29

So, you want to create an interface that expose a method that return an unknown IEnumerable? Is there a direct advantage in using the generic version of IEnumerble in this case beside saving some cast/test/overload that you would have to do anyway if you want to use those objects after the method is returned?

While I won't dispute that dynamic can be useful in some case. In my opinion, it often displays a design flaw. Every time I came to use it, I actually sat down and thought if I really needed it. And most of the time, I came to the conclusion that with some simple changes, I could eliminate it and make a cleaner design.

In this case, do you truly need to have a generic type with dynamic? My first and quick guess would be, you can probably use the non-generic IEnumerable.

Or if you want to save some casting, and you have different elements in there, you can find common ground to all element. I see that right now, all your property are string. Or if you want to return combination of elements, you can use some Tuple<>

If you truly end up returning a complete unknown types of lot of different objects, you could use IEnumerable<object>, but then I would question the reason of existence of that interface implementation. I don't remember ever creating an interface that would return object with absolutely any kind of common ground between the different implementation, or even within a single implementation. It could controls, numbers, components, entities... But they tend to share something. If it's properties, you could even pack in some PropertyInfo!

TL:DR; Unless you can present a very clear case where this design pattern would serve a very specific purpose that is unavoidable by any other means, I would recommend not using it. My IEnumerable of 2 cents.

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Thanks for the insight. I am adding this method to an existing interface and class. It has a bunch of other methods.The advantage here would be that I wont have to create a third type with some properties of Foo and some of Bar.If I am not mistaken,even if I use a generic version of IEnumerable, I'll need that third type similar to viewmodel, won't I? .. again thanks for the insight :) –  Yogiraj Nov 15 '12 at 22:45
1  
@Yogiraj: Generic IEnumerable is similar to IEnumerable<object>, only cleaner to use in interface and abstract method as you are not limited to <object> but still can use generics later. You still haven't really answered why you think you should use dynamic in this case. Dynamic is cool when you know exactly what a method would give you, but the method implementation doesn't return you the exact type that you know it will, and you don't mind skipping some casting. If you don't know what's in that variable, you will end up with some runtime exceptions as you call invalid methods on them. –  LightStriker Nov 15 '12 at 22:53

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