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If I have an object Mode, would it be acceptable, according to common/standard conventions, to call the variable mode? While I was bringing up a hypothetical situation during my CS class (high school), my teacher interrupted me to ask why I would call an object the same name as the class, without the capital? (This is very much taken out of context, but my hypothetical situation was irrelevant to this.)

Also, I already understand that if my teacher says something like this, I should generally just do it to conform to her desired conventions. I am just wondering if in general, it is acceptable.

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There is no convention that discourages this. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 15 '12 at 22:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

I think this is completely fine. This is normal practice. Class instances are most of the time named same but start in lowercase.

General naming pattern is to name the classes and variables with little descriptive names to increase the readability and maintainability. As long as naming is self explanatory, its fine.

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+1 and I would upvote again (if I could) for the second paragraph –  alfasin Nov 15 '12 at 22:21

I would say that follows popular convention. The idea is that if you have to name the variable something different than the class name, then you should probably change the class names.

Using good, descriptive names makes for readable and maintainable code.

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I couldn't disagree more with your second sentence (The idea is that if you have to name the variable something different than the class name, then you should probably change the class names.). If that were the case, then all people should be named "person". –  Nate Jan 7 '13 at 9:36
    
That comment makes no sense to me. By your logic, anything plural should be called by it's singular name. If you have multiple different instances of the same class, obviously you will have to differentiate those. But it doesnt make sense to name an InputStream, SpaceInvader, and then say SpaceInvader inputStream = new SpaceInvader(); You shouldnt have to look to the instance name to know what the class is. –  CaTalyst.X Feb 13 '13 at 22:37
    
I agree with you, in that you obviously didn't understand the comment. In the case of your example, if the input stream was just used to read in a list of space invaders, then appropriately named code might be InputStream spaceInvaders;. Not vice versa, as you wrote. The instance name should be more specific, not less. Your last sentence completely contradicts your answer. In your answer, you say that you should name a variable the same as the class, and in your rebuttal comment, you say that you shouldn't have to look at the instance name to deduce the class. Which is it? –  Nate Feb 13 '13 at 22:44
    
@Nate, I don't understand where you draw the contradiction. In my answer, I stated that if you have to name the variable something other than the class name, you should change the class name. In my rebuttal, I said you shouldn't have to look at the instance name to know what the class is. Where is the contradiction? –  CaTalyst.X Apr 5 '13 at 1:09
    
@Nate, Also, I would not name an InputStream reading in a list of space invaders 'spaceInvaders'. This doesnt make any sense. Its called an InputStream because it is an InputStream, it is generic. I might say spaceInvadersInputStream if you had two InputStreams being used in the same lexical scope. Once the Space Invaders are read into whatever SpaceInvader object represents the space invaders, a collection of those SpaceInvader objects might be called spaceInvaders. –  CaTalyst.X Apr 5 '13 at 1:18

As far as I can see it acceptable, note however that it can be confusing, especially if you're using more than one object of that class.

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