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I have to define attributes of book through tags, and I am thinking about creating tables

Table Books
Book_Id INT, PK
Book_Name varchar


Table Tags
Tag_Id INT, PK
Tag_Name varchar

A book can have multiple tags like horror, funny, dark etc. How would i define a one to many relationship between a book and all its tags?

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You will want to create a join table between the books and tags, something like this:

Books_Tags Table
Book_id int   -- will be PK
Tag_ig int    -- will be PK

Your Primary Key for the join table will consist of both fields (book_id and tag_id) which will also be foreign keys to your other tables.

Then when you want to query the data your query will be similar to this:

select *
from books b
left join books_tags bt
  on b.book_id = bt.bookid
left join tags t
  on bt.tag_id = t.tag_id
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Thank you very much. Exactly what i was looking for. –  tven Nov 15 '12 at 23:02
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Consider using natural keys (as opposed to surrogate "tag ID") to avoid one of the JOINs that would otherwise be necessary when searching on tags (which is likely to be a performance-critical path on a reasonably sized database).

For example:

CREATE TABLE BOOK (
    BOOK_ID INT PRIMARY KEY
    -- Other fields...
);

CREATE TABLE BOOK_TAG (
    TAG_NAME VARCHAR(30),
    BOOK_ID INT,
    PRIMARY KEY (TAG_NAME, BOOK_ID),
    FOREIGN KEY (BOOK_ID) REFERENCES BOOK (BOOK_ID) ON DELETE CASCADE
);

-- For enforcing and cascading the FK and for GROUP BY (in the query below).
CREATE INDEX BOOK_TAG_IE1 ON BOOK_TAG (BOOK_ID, TAG_NAME);

CREATE TABLE TAG (
    TAG_NAME VARCHAR(30) PRIMARY KEY,
    -- Other fields...
);

You can now get the books that have any of the given tags like this:

SELECT *
FROM BOOK
WHERE BOOK_ID IN (
    SELECT BOOK_ID
    FROM BOOK_TAG
    WHERE
        TAG_NAME = 'tag1'
        OR TAG_NAME = 'tag2'
        -- Etc...
);

And books that have all of the given tags like this:

SELECT *
FROM BOOK
WHERE BOOK_ID IN (
    SELECT BOOK_ID
    FROM BOOK_TAG
    WHERE
        TAG_NAME = 'tag1'
        OR TAG_NAME = 'tag2'
        -- Etc...
    GROUP BY BOOK_ID
    HAVING COUNT(TAG_NAME) = 2
);

[Working SQL Fiddle Example]

As you can see, there is only one JOIN (written as IN here). There is no need to JOIN with the TAG table at all when searching for books (or just displaying tag names - not shown here).

The only reason to do the second JOIN is if/when you need to get these "other fields" from the TAG table.

Considerations:

  • If you don't need to store any additional information per tag (i.e you don't have tag description etc.), you can omit the TAG table altogether.
  • If your DBMS supports it, consider clustering BOOK_TAG. You are accessing it only through indexes anyway, so you can remove the "unnecessary" table heap.
  • Again, if your DBMS supports it, compress the leading edges of indexes (BOOK_TAG PK and BOOK_TAG_IE1), to save space on repeated values, and more importantly, increase the cache effectiveness.
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I would make a 3rd table and make Book > Tags a many to many relationship.

So:

Table Books Book_Id INT, PK Book_Name varchar

Table Tags Tag_Id INT, PK Tag_Name varchar

Table BookTags Id INT, PK Book_Id INT Tag_Id Int

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Thank you. Was helpful. –  tven Nov 16 '12 at 1:42
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