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Consider an application that is CPU bound, but also has high-performance I/O requirements.

I'm comparing Linux file I/O to Windows, and I can't see how epoll will help a Linux program at all. The kernel will tell me that the file descriptor is "ready for reading," but I still have to call blocking read() to get my data, and if I want to read megabytes, it's pretty clear that that will block.

On Windows, I can create a file handle with OVERLAPPED set, and then use non-blocking I/O, and get notified when the I/O completes, and use the data from that completion function. I need to spend no application-level wall-clock time waiting for data, which means I can precisely tune my number of threads to my number of cores, and get 100% efficient CPU utilization.

If I have to emulate asynchronous I/O on Linux, then I have to allocate some number of threads to do this, and those threads will spend a little bit of time doing CPU things, and a lot of time blocking for I/O, plus there will be overhead in the messaging to/from those threads. Thus, I will either over-subscribe or under-utilize my CPU cores.

I looked at mmap() + madvise() (WILLNEED) as a "poor man's async I/O" but it still doesn't get all the way there, because I can't get a notification when it's done -- I have to "guess" and if I guess "wrong" I will end up blocking on memory access, waiting for data to come from disk.

Linux seems to have the starts of async I/O in io_submit, and it seems to also have a user-space POSIX aio implementation, but it's been that way for a while, and I know of nobody who would vouch for these systems for critical, high-performance applications.

The Windows model works roughly like this:

  1. Issue an asynchronous operation.
  2. Tie the asynchronous operation to a particular I/O completion port.
  3. Wait on operations to complete on that port
  4. When the I/O is complete, the thread waiting on the port unblocks, and returns a reference to the pending I/O operation.

Steps 1/2 are typically done as a single thing. Steps 3/4 are typically done with a pool of worker threads, not (necessarily) the same thread as issues the I/O. This model is somewhat similar to the model provided by boost::asio, except boost::asio doesn't actually give you asynchronous block-based (disk) I/O.

The difference to epoll in Linux is that in step 4, no I/O has yet happened -- it hoists step 1 to come after step 4, which is "backwards" if you know exactly what you need already.

Having programmed a large number of embedded, desktop, and server operating systems, I can say that this model of asynchronous I/O is very natural for certain kinds of programs. It is also very high-throughput and low-overhead. I think this is one of the remaining real shortcomings of the Linux I/O model, at the API level.

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I don't know the MS Windows model at all, so I can't compare, but I would just point out that if you are using any form of select/poll/epoll/kqueue then it would be VERY unusual to follow up with blocking read/write when you get a notification that a file descriptor is ready. You almost certainly want to do a non-blocking read or write there. –  Celada Nov 17 '12 at 4:49
    
select() was invented for sockets, together with the recv() and send() system calls, that guarantee to not block if select() returns them as ready -- with the draw-back that the amount of I/O is not guaranteed. You may get only a few bytes. The problem is that you can't be reactive with this model. Non-blocking I/O is not efficient, because it requires the kernel to pre-fetch "some amount" of data, and the kernel has no idea how much you will need. If you need just a page, and the kernel fetches a megabyte, you lose. If you need a megabyte, and the kernel fetches a single page, you also lose. –  Jon Watte Nov 19 '12 at 1:15
    
possible duplicate of Linux Disk File AIO –  J-16 SDiZ Nov 20 '12 at 5:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The real answer, which was indirectly pointed to by Peter Teoh, is based on io_setup() and io_submit(). Specifically, the "aio_" functions indicated by Peter are part of the glibc user-level emulation based on threads, which is not an efficient implementation. The real answer is in:

io_submit(2)
io_setup(2)
io_cancel(2)
io_destroy(2)
io_getevents(2)

Note that the man page, dated 2012-08, says that this implementation has not yet matured to the point where it can replace the glibc user-space emulation:

http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man7/aio.7.html

this implementation hasn't yet matured to the point where the POSIX AIO implementation can be completely reimplemented using the kernel system calls.

So, according to the latest kernel documentation I can find, Linux does not yet have a mature, kernel-based asynchronous I/O model. And, if I assume that the documented model is actually mature, it still doesn't support partial I/O in the sense of recv() vs read().

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In linux kernel, the philosophy is that nothing is "stable" and mature, as the community is always ready to change its API when necessary. But anything published in userspace like man7.org man pages, the kernel have to follow and never break userspace. That statement is from Linus himself. But if you say now that kernel (read here: lxr.free-electrons.com/source/include/linux/syscalls.h line 474) has the syscall API, then we can always use syscall() to call the kernel directly, irregardless whether io_submit() (and its family) API has been implemented in glibc. –  Peter Teoh Feb 22 at 8:11
    
The problem I have with your answer is that you recommend the "aio_xxx()" functions API as "the async I/O API." However, that API is not actually backed by the Linux syscalls, but instead implemented using user-space threads in glibc. At least, according to the man page. Thus, the "aio_xxx()" functions are not an answer to the question -- they are the cause for the question. The right answer is the functions starting with "io_setup()". –  Jon Watte Feb 23 at 18:15
    
By aio_xxx() all along I am referring to kernel API. So of course there is no "Linux syscall" standards for it, neither is there any manpages for it (meaning the official Linux API), which is strictly ONLY for userspace. In general, all kernel API does not go into any "standard API" list, as it is always said (in mailing list, eg, lkml.org/lkml/2006/6/14/164) that kernel API are quite fluid, but neither is changes so easily approved either. –  Peter Teoh Feb 24 at 1:46

As explained in:

http://code.google.com/p/kernel/wiki/AIOUserGuide

and here:

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-async/

Linux does provide async block I/O at the kernel level, APIs as follows:

aio_read    Request an asynchronous read operation
aio_error   Check the status of an asynchronous request
aio_return  Get the return status of a completed asynchronous request
aio_write   Request an asynchronous operation
aio_suspend Suspend the calling process until one or more asynchronous requests have completed (or failed)
aio_cancel  Cancel an asynchronous I/O request
lio_listio  Initiate a list of I/O operations

And if you asked who are the users of these API, it is the kernel itself - just a small subset is shown here:

./drivers/net/tun.c (for network tunnelling):
static ssize_t tun_chr_aio_read(struct kiocb *iocb, const struct iovec *iv,

./drivers/usb/gadget/inode.c:
ep_aio_read(struct kiocb *iocb, const struct iovec *iov,

./net/socket.c (general socket programming):
static ssize_t sock_aio_read(struct kiocb *iocb, const struct iovec *iov,

./mm/filemap.c (mmap of files):
generic_file_aio_read(struct kiocb *iocb, const struct iovec *iov,

./mm/shmem.c:
static ssize_t shmem_file_aio_read(struct kiocb *iocb,

etc.

At the userspace level, there is also the io_submit() etc API (from glibc), but the following article offer an alternative to using glibc:

http://www.fsl.cs.sunysb.edu/~vass/linux-aio.txt

It directly implement the API for functions like io_setup() as direct syscall (bypassing glibc dependencies), a kernel mapping via the same "__NR_io_setup" signature should exist. Upon searching the kernel source at:

http://lxr.free-electrons.com/source/include/linux/syscalls.h#L474 (URL is applicable for the latest version 3.13) you are greeted with the direct implementation of these io_*() API in the kernel:

474 asmlinkage long sys_io_setup(unsigned nr_reqs, aio_context_t __user *ctx);
475 asmlinkage long sys_io_destroy(aio_context_t ctx);
476 asmlinkage long sys_io_getevents(aio_context_t ctx_id,
481 asmlinkage long sys_io_submit(aio_context_t, long,
483 asmlinkage long sys_io_cancel(aio_context_t ctx_id, struct iocb __user *iocb,

The later version of glibc should make these usage of "syscall()" to call sys_io_setup() unnecessary, but without the latest version of glibc, you can always make these call yourself if you are using the later kernel with these capabilities of "sys_io_setup()".

Of course, there are other userspace option for asynchronous I/O (eg, using signals?):

http://personal.denison.edu/~bressoud/cs375-s13/supplements/linux_altIO.pdf

or perhap:

What is the status of POSIX asynchronous I/O (AIO)?

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Thanks for the answer. It seems aio_suspend() cannot mix with event or select style I/O, though. For example: Is there no aio version of recv()? –  Jon Watte Feb 18 at 17:31
    
not really. If you google "asynchronous recv" (without the quotes) you will get many answer, eg this one: wangafu.net/~nickm/libevent-book/01_intro.html. Within it did provide an example of non-blocking recv(), through the use of "fnctl()". but then it highlight that now the program spin very fast into a loop, using up all the CPU cycles. select() and libevent API are the alternatives proposed within to solve the above problem. –  Peter Teoh Feb 20 at 1:22
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I am very familiar with non-blocking socket I/O. Non-blocking is not the same as asynchronous. And read is not the same as recv. What I'm looking for is a way to push all I/O through the same "queue a request, then later get notification about what queued requests have completed" mechanism for all I/O, like I/O completion ports on Windows. Just like I stated in the question ;-) –  Jon Watte Feb 20 at 17:22
    
A function that was missing in the above list is io_getevents(). With that addition, the set of primitives starts looking more like what I expect. Now, if there was a clear code example from some robust user-level application using this, that'd make my day! –  Jon Watte Feb 20 at 17:29
1  
Actually, reading more, this is not a true answer: "The current Linux POSIX AIO implementation is provided in user space by glibc." The right answer is based on io_setup() and io_submit(). –  Jon Watte Feb 20 at 17:34

For network socket i/o, when it is "ready", it don't block. That's what the O_NONBLOCK and "ready" means.

For disk i/o, we have posix aio, linux aio, sendfile and friends.

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posix aio is implemented in userland in glibc, using threads, so no, it's not true AIO. Linux AIO (io_submit) is something I want to hear more about, but I've seen nobody actually use it for anything, which to me means there be dragons there. That's part of what this question is trying to suss out. sendfile() has nothing to do with asynchronous disk-based I/O. I'd be happy to accept your answer if it actually contributes to a solution -- but notice that I already mentioned io_submit in my question. –  Jon Watte Nov 20 '12 at 2:52
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Linux AIO is not unused... For example, InnoDB (MySQL) use io_submit. –  J-16 SDiZ Nov 20 '12 at 5:57
    
That's an excellent use case -- thanks! –  Jon Watte Nov 22 '12 at 1:59
    
Also: when it comes to network sockets, you should look at the difference between read() and recv(). io_submit() seems to support the read() semantic, not the recv() semantic. O_NONBLOCK is never needed for sockets if you use recv() and proper select() or event notification. –  Jon Watte May 18 at 16:19

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