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I am working on a problem that need to reverse a integer input without using list or string. But my program only return first and last digits.

def reverseDisplay(number):
   if number<10:
      return number 
   else:
      return reverseDisplay(number//10)
def main():
    number=int(input("Enter a number:"))
    print(number%10,end='')
    print(reverseDisplay(number))
main()

It's seems like the reverse function just worked only once.

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9 Answers 9

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This should work:

from math import log10
def rev(num):
    if num < 10:
        return num
    else:
        ones = num % 10
        rest = num // 10
        #print ones, rest, int(log10(rest) + 1), ones * 10 ** int(log10(rest) + 1)
        return ones * 10 ** int(log10(rest) + 1) + rev(rest)
print rev(9000), rev(1234), rev(1234567890123456789)

You could also reduce the number of times you call log10 and number of math operations by using a nested recursive function:

def rev(num):
    def rec(num, tens):
        if num < 10:
            return num        
        else:
            return num % 10 * tens + rec(num // 10, tens // 10)
    return rec(num, 10 ** int(log10(num)))
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1  
Your points regarding my solution were totally spot on. Thank you for pointing them out! –  Akavall Nov 16 '12 at 16:57

It's running multiple times, but it only returns the left-most digit. It's pretty easy to see that's the case, if you consider under what circumstance the if will be true.

To make this work, you need to add in the digits that you skipped as you pass out of the recursion. The following works by simply tacking the passed digits to the left of the previous result. I'd rather do it without the string conversion, but I couldn't come up with an elegant way to do that...

def reverseDisplay(number):
   if number<10:
      return number 
   else:
      return int(str(number%10) + str(reverseDisplay(number//10)))
def main():
    number=int(input("Enter a number:"))
    print(number%10,end='')
    print(reverseDisplay(number))
main()
share|improve this answer
def reverseDisplay(number):
    if number<10:     
        return number                      #1 
    first_digit = number % 10              #2
    the_rest = reverseDisplay(number//10)
    ex = 0
    while 1:                               #3
        ex = ex + 1
        if number//(pow(10,ex)) == 0:
            break
    ex = ex - 1
    return first_digit*pow(10,ex) + the_rest #4

Here's how it works... (I've labelled the lines Im referring to here)

  • line 1: exit condition. But you know this
  • line 2: get the last digit. % means find the remainder of the division
  • line 3: if say we pass in 123. At this point we have first_digit=3 and the_rest=21. We want the result to be 321 = 300 + 21. So pretty much what we need is to know how many times we need to times first_digit by 10 for this to work
  • line 4: mmm delicious
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You can do this by maintaining an extra count that keeps track of how many digits have been dealt with already.

This can be done using a wrapper function:

def reverseRecursion(number, i):
    if number < 10:
        return number 
    else:
        return reverseRecursion(number//10, i+1) + (number % 10)*(10**i)

def reverseDisplay(number):
    return reverseRecursion(number, 1)

def main():
    number = 1234
    print(reverseDisplay(number))

main()

The idea is to use the counter to keep track of how many trailing zeroes to add to the current number to make the addition work.

Tracing through this would be:

number = 1234

ans(123) + 40
ans(12) + 300 + 40
ans(1) + 2000 + 300 + 40
1 + 2000 + 300 + 40
=> 2341
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Under the assumption, that recursion was not a requirement (always a good idea to replace it by iteration if easily possible), I suggest the code below. I changed the function name for clarity and also avoid the overkill of exponentiation and logarithm operations in other suggestions.

def reverseNumber(n):
   assert isinstance(n, int) and n >= 0
   base = 10
   result = 0
   while n != 0:
      n, remainder = divmod(n, base)
      result = result*base + remainder
   return result
share|improve this answer
    
but he's not asking for a generator. An answer should be RETURNED –  Sheena Nov 15 '12 at 23:14
    
With a few changes, this would be a much better solution than mine. Just change isinstance(n, int) to isinstance(n, (int, long)) to allow it to handle arbitrarily long numbers, and apply pep8 to it (4 space indents). It's apx 4x faster than my first and 2x faster than my second solution. –  John Gaines Jr. Nov 16 '12 at 16:39

Edit: This is a working solution.

def rev(x, prod=0):
    if x < 10:
        return prod + x
    else:
        prod = prod * 10 + x%10 * 10
        return rev(x / 10, prod)

Result:

>>> rev(123)
321
>>> rev(12345)
54321
>>> rev(72823780029)
92008732827L
>>> rev(1)
1
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The posted code does not work. For the input 123, in 2.7.3 it returns 51 and in 3.3.0 it returns apx. 54.23. Perhaps you posted the wrong code as your example answers use a different function name? –  John Gaines Jr. Nov 16 '12 at 15:07
    
@John Gaines Jr. Fixed. –  Akavall Nov 16 '12 at 20:41
def inverte_digitos(n):
        def inverte_aux(n, n_novo):
                if n == 0:
                        return n_novo
                else:
                        return inverte_aux(n//10, n_novo*10+n%10)
        return inverte_aux(n, 0)

This is what I did

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def reverseDisplay(variable):


        if variable // 10  == 0  : #base case
                print (variable, end='')
                return
        else:
                first = variable % 10
                every_dig_after = variable // 10 
                return reverseDisplay (variable % 10 )   ,  reverseDisplay(every_dig_after) 




def main():
        number = int (input ( "Enterr a number:"))
        reverseDisplay(number)

main()
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def reverseDisplay(number):
   if number<10:
      return number 
   else:
      return reverseDisplay(number//10) + number # you forgot add me
share|improve this answer
    
That leaves us with reverseDisplay(91) => 100. right... –  Sheena Nov 15 '12 at 22:49
    
but that would return a wrong value i.e. input is 123 and output is 3136. –  user1718826 Nov 15 '12 at 22:53
    
This isn't correct at all. –  Wilduck Nov 15 '12 at 22:54

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