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I used the instructions on Wikipedia to write a Galois linear feedback shift register in Python:

def lfsr(coefficients, state):
    while 1:
        lsb = state.pop()
        state.insert(0, 0)
        if lsb:
            state = app(coefficients, state)

        yield lsb

def app(coefficients, state):
    return [ (coefficients[i]^state[i]) for i in range(len(state)) ]

L = lfsr([1,0,1,1,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1], [0]*15+[1])
seq = [ str(L.next()) for i in range(2**16+16) ]

This works fine. What I would like to do now is write a generalised version that could handle Galois fields other than GF(2) but I don't understand the section about non-binary LFSRs. This part doesn't make sense to me: "the feedback bit (output bit) is multiplied (modulo-q) by a q-ary value which is constant for each specific tap point." How can a single output bit be multiplied by values for each tap point?

This is what I came up with but instead of giving a cyclic sequence, the output quickly deteriorates to all 0s:

# Multiplication table for GF(4)
mult_4 = [[0, 0, 0, 0],
          [0, 1, 2, 3],
          [0, 2, 3, 1],
          [0, 3, 1, 2]]

def lfsr(coefficients, state):
    while 1:
        lsb = state.pop()
        state.insert(0, 0)
        state = app(coefficients, state)

        yield lsb

def app(coefficients, state):
    return [ mult_4[coefficients[i]][state[i]] for i in range(len(state)) ]

L = lfsr([ 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 3 ], [1]*6)
seq = [ str(L.next()) for i in range(4**6+6) ]
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What do you mean by "it doesn't seem to work?" –  me_and Nov 15 '12 at 23:07
    
The output is not a cyclic sequence. The polynomial used should in fact give a maximum-length cyclic sequence. –  Greg Slodkowicz Nov 15 '12 at 23:13
    
Do you have a reference for your assertion that the polynomial you're using generates a maximal cycle? –  eh9 Nov 20 '12 at 5:43

2 Answers 2

You could ask on math.stackoverflow.com about multiplication under Galois fields, but the gist of it is that instead of 'bits', where each bit is either 0 or 1 (GF_2), each 'bit' is actually one of a number of symbols -- the exact number depends on the size of the field.

To go from a binary LFSR to a Galois LFSR, you have to generalize the concept of a 'bit', and of 'multiplication', to make sense in that field. The multiplication operation Addition in the field also takes the place of the XOR in your app() function.

In the binary version, the multiplication is implicit; the output bit is either multiplied by 0 or 1, depending on whether a tap is present. In the general field, the tap itself can have any field element associated with it, which is then multiplied by the output.

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I think I understand that part, what I don't get for example is what happens to the constant term of the polynomial (which seem to be always 1 in the binary case) or how to set the most significant bit. –  Greg Slodkowicz Nov 15 '12 at 22:53

I'd recommend you acquaint yourself with the concept of polynomial rings (though that Wikipedia article is rather too technical to make the best introduction). The most fundamental problem you seem to be having is that you're trying to mimic a binary shift register too closely, not fully understanding what's going on when you view it as a discrete dynamical system, rather than as a circuit.

Binary shift registers are a clever circuits that compute the remainders of X^N when divided by f(X), where all the coefficients of f are in the ring Z/2Z, the ring containing only 0 and 1. These remainders are computed with Euclid's algorithm, just like computing remainders for integers. The state of an LFSR in this model is some polynomial of degree less than the degree of f. The first state of an LFSR is 1, and the second is X. Each cycle in an LFSR is equivalent multiplying by X and then one step of long division. The shift operation is the multiplication and the taps are the long division. Division is really at the heart here.

[Aside: you can use arbitrary rings as coefficients for this construction, but the problem of a zero divisor as the leading coefficient of a divisor polynomial complicates things. Since you're using a field anyway, I'll just talk about fields as coefficients.]

If you're using rings of coefficients other than bits, you need to think about what one step of long division looks like. If the divisor polynomial f looks like a_k X^k + ..., and the new state g looks like b_k X^k + ..., then the first step in long division is computing b_k / a_k. For a field (as I'm assuming), that's some number c. So the remainder is g - cf, which is a polynomial with degree k-1. The remainder is your new state.

(The expression cf is the key to understand the part of the Wikipedia article that confounded you. You might want to convince yourself that you can divide a polynomial f by its leading coefficient a_k to get another polynomial that generates a sequence that's just a multiple of that of the first.)

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