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The following is the C# code and generated SQL in a LINQ to SQL query for two cases.

Case 1

using (JulianDataContext dc = new JulianDataContext(this.CurrentConnectionString))
{
#if DEBUG
    dc.Log = new DebugTextWriter();
#endif

    IEnumerable<UserNewsfeedDeliveryTime> temp = dc.UserNewsfeedDeliveryTimes.Where(u => u.NewsfeedEmailPeriodicity > 0 && DateTime.Today >= u.NextNewsfeedDelivery.Value.Date);

    ids = temp.Select(p => p.Id).ToList();
}

SELECT [t0].[Id], [t0].[NewsfeedEmailPeriodicity], [t0].[LastSentNewsfeedEmail], [t0].[NextNewsfeedDelivery]
FROM [dbo].[UserNewsfeedDeliveryTimes] AS [t0]
WHERE ([t0].[NewsfeedEmailPeriodicity] > @p0) AND (@p1 >= CONVERT(DATE, [t0].[NextNewsfeedDelivery]))
-- @p0: Input Int (Size = -1; Prec = 0; Scale = 0) [0]
-- @p1: Input DateTime (Size = -1; Prec = 0; Scale = 0) [15-11-2012 00:00:00]

Case 2

using (JulianDataContext dc = new JulianDataContext(this.CurrentConnectionString))
{
#if DEBUG
            dc.Log = new DebugTextWriter();
#endif
    IEnumerable<UserNewsfeedDeliveryTime> temp = dc.GetTable<UserNewsfeedDeliveryTime>();

    temp = temp.Where(u => u.NewsfeedEmailPeriodicity > 0 && DateTime.Today >= u.NextNewsfeedDelivery.Value.Date);

    ids = temp.Select(p => p.Id).ToList();
}
SELECT [t0].[Id], [t0].[NewsfeedEmailPeriodicity], [t0].[LastSentNewsfeedEmail], [t0].[NextNewsfeedDelivery]
FROM [dbo].[UserNewsfeedDeliveryTimes] AS [t0]

The difference

The difference between these two linq queries:

dc.UserNewsfeedDeliveryTimes

and

dc.GetTable<UserNewsfeedDeliveryTime>()

Why? Could it be that, in case 2, LINQ to SQL is retrieving all data from database and finish the query by filtering all objects in memory?

If so, how can we make keep this generic and still force all the T-SQL to be generated?

Solution

Both answers, are correct but I had to pick one, sorry! I think also it is interesting to add that in this case, since I changed to work with an IQueryable (inherits from IEnumerable), in this line:

temp = temp.Where(u => u.NewsfeedEmailPeriodicity > 0 && DateTime.Today >= u.NextNewsfeedDelivery.Value.Date);

I had two overload methods, one from the IQueryable interface and another to the IEnumerable interface.

public static IQueryable<TSource> Where<TSource>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, Expression<Func<TSource, bool>> predicate);
public static IEnumerable<TSource> Where<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, bool> predicate);

So I had to convert my predicate explicitly to Expression> predicate, otherwise the IEnumerable interface method would have been picked up at compile time and, if I am not mistaken, I would get some dynamic sql exception saying the T-SQL could not have been generated.

share|improve this question
    
"in case 2, LINQ to SQL is retrieving all data from database and finish the query" : your sql suggests the other way around": that in case 1 it does not filter in the DB. However case 1 should in normal cases create the where clause and filter using T-Sql. – Pleun Nov 16 '12 at 8:06
    
Corrected. I meant case 1 retrieving all data. Thanks @Pleun. Did you ever try this? This is the weirdest thing. It's really important to solve this or, as the database grows, this will become a painful bottleneck - this is not live yet. – Bomboca Nov 16 '12 at 10:22
    
This is really weird. I did an example very similar to your first one and I see the WHERE clause in the log. – w0lf Nov 16 '12 at 10:45
    
I have never experienced this before. Can you profile the sql on the database side to be 100 percent sure? – Pleun Nov 16 '12 at 11:14
1  
My understanding is that the problem isn't related to use of dc.GetTable in the second example, but rather the fact that the query is split into two and hence when you are calling temp.Where it makes a difference if you are executing IQueryable.Where vs IEnumerable.Where. – sgmoore Nov 16 '12 at 13:42
up vote 2 down vote accepted

From my understanding, IEnumerable does not transform the original query information that IQueryable holds. It's almost as if the cast freezes any changes to the IQueryable query at the point of casting. If you look at MSDN, it turns out that IQueryable inherits IEnumerable:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.linq.iqueryable.aspx

Hence, you see this behaviour. It is important with LINQ-SQL to work with IQueryable unless you want the query frozen at the point it is turned to an IEnumerable.

In your first example, the where is inclusive of the original query. The select is not hence the query generated.

In your second example, you capture the table itself into an IEnumerable. Any changes on top of this are done in memory on top of the original query.

When you think, the IEnumerable version of where will not be able to transform the original data of the IQueryable due to the cast and how inheritance works.

When you also consider deferred loading, and how LINQ works, this seems to make sense. To me it is a big annoyance, as it can lead you into generating some terrible performing code.

share|improve this answer

Try using IQueryable instead of IEnumerable.

Weird, because on my examples I get the opposite results from you, ie with IEnumerable, case 1 works fast and case 2 retrieves all the data. But using IQueryable fixes the issue.

share|improve this answer
    
I just took another look and you got the opposite results that I mentioned because I mixed up the code. Now the problem is correctly reported. Will try your suggestion later. Thanks! +1 – Bomboca Nov 16 '12 at 13:19

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