Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two classes Owning and OwningAccessor. The files are in the same directory.

public class Owning {
    String _name = "";
    public void printBanner()
    {
    }
    public void printOwning(double amount)
    {
        printBanner();

        //print details
        System.out.println("name:" + _name);
        System.out.println("amount:" + amount);
    }
}


public class OwningAccessor {
    public void access()
    {
        Owning o = new Owning();
        o.printOwning(500);
    }
}

When I tried to compile OwningAccessor with javac -cp . OwningAccessor.java, I got compilation error.

symbol  : class Owning
location: class smcho.OwningAccessor
        Owning o = new Owning();
        ^
OwningAccessor.java:6: cannot find symbol
symbol  : class Owning
location: class smcho.OwningAccessor
        Owning o = new Owning();
                   ^

What's wrong with this? The code compiles fine under eclipse IDE.

share|improve this question
3  
are they in the same directory? Show your source path directory structure –  Juan Mendes Nov 15 '12 at 23:22
    
They are in the same directory. –  prosseek Nov 15 '12 at 23:27
    
No repro, works here. Does it work if you first compile Owning.java? –  Daniel Fischer Nov 15 '12 at 23:27
    
Don't you need a this in there somewhere? –  Burhan Khalid Nov 15 '12 at 23:28
    
@Daniel: No, it doesn't work even I compile the Owning.java to get class file. –  prosseek Nov 15 '12 at 23:52
show 2 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Ok, let's suppose you have the code distributed in files as follows

myproject
├── out
└── src
    ├── OwningAccessor.java
    └── Owning.java

Go to your command prompt, and change directory to myproject. Once there issue the following command:

javac -d out -sourcepath src src/OwningAccessor.java

I just tested it and it works just fine. Your compiled classes will be located in the out folder:

.
├── out
│   ├── OwningAccessor.class
│   └── Owning.class
└── src
    ├── OwningAccessor.java
    └── Owning.java

Compiling one class will trigger the compilation of all other dependent classes. The compiler will automatically look for them in the src folder.

share|improve this answer
    
It works fine with me, what interests me is that I should be outside the src directory. javac -sourcepath . ./OwningAccessor.jav doesn't work. –  prosseek Nov 16 '12 at 0:03
    
this just complies the program, i wonder why I am not getting output of systme.out.print in CMD ? –  Faizan Mar 6 '13 at 17:02
add comment

Make sure you compile both Owning.java and OwningAccessor.java, like so:

javac -cp . Owning.java OwningAccessor.java

Eclipse compiles all necessary files for you, which is why does work there.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't java figure out dependencies on its own? –  Juan Mendes Nov 15 '12 at 23:24
1  
It does if you use the -sourcepath flag in your compiler –  Edwin Dalorzo Nov 15 '12 at 23:26
    
Sourcepath should do the trick, unfortunately I cannot test it as javac on my machine crashes with an ACCESS_VIOLATION on anything I try to compile... –  Kninnug Nov 15 '12 at 23:28
    
@Kninnug: -sourcepath doesn't work. I don't see reason why compilation all the source at once works whereas one by one does not. –  prosseek Nov 15 '12 at 23:36
    
Well, like I said, I can't test it right now (except in Eclipse, which is what we don't want). But apparently javac doesn't look for the necessary files by itself. You could also enter javac -cp . *.java which should compile all the .java files in that directory. –  Kninnug Nov 15 '12 at 23:39
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.