Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm experiencing some strange behavior when using static imports of inherited static methods:

com/example/util/BaseUtil.java:

package com.example.util;

/*default*/ class BaseUtil {
    public static final void foo(){ System.out.println("foo"); }
}

com/example/util/Util.java:

package com.example.util;

public final class Util extends BaseUtil{
    public static void bar(){ System.out.println("bar"); }
    //foo() will be inherited
}

com/example/UtilTest.java

package com.example;

import static com.example.util.Util.bar;
import static com.example.util.Util.foo;

public class UtilTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        bar();
        foo();
    }
}

Running UtilTest result in an unchecked exception!

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalAccessError: tried to access class com.example.util.BaseUtil from class com.example.UtilTest

    at com.example.UtilTest.main(UtilTest.java:15)

However, if I were to reference the methods via Util (without static imports) everything works as expected:

com/example/UtilTest.java

package com.example;

import com.example.util.Util;

public class UtilTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Util.bar();
        Util.foo();
    }
}

So, what gives?

share|improve this question
    
thanks, i learnt something new today, i dint know that static and final methods are accessible from your subclass. i knew they cant be inherited but dint know that the subclass can access them .. thanks again :) –  PermGenError Nov 15 '12 at 23:53
    
final methods do get inherited, however, subclasses can't override them. on the other hand, methods with a private modifier in the parent class are not accessible to the subclasses (regardless of whether they're final or not) –  Andrey Nov 16 '12 at 1:17
    
i am confused now, FROM SCJP book by kathy and bert --- Final methods cannot be overriden, only inherited methods may be overriden –  PermGenError Nov 16 '12 at 1:22
    
i don't know that book. but the spec makes it pretty clear. –  Andrey Nov 16 '12 at 1:37
    
thanks for the link .. :) –  PermGenError Nov 16 '12 at 7:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
/*default*/ class BaseUtil { //only visible within the package com/example/util

That class has defualt access specifier, which makes it invisible from outside of that package.

You need to make it public.

Update

Following is how the decompilation looks like:

public class com.example.UtilTest extends java.lang.Object{
public com.example.UtilTest();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #8; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0:   invokestatic    #16; //Method com/example/util/Util.bar:()V
   3:   invokestatic    #21; //Method com/example/util/BaseUtil.foo:()V
   6:   return

}

And the following is what I get by using JD GUI

package com.example;

import com.example.util.BaseUtil;
import com.example.util.Util;

public class UtilTest
{
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    Util.bar();
    BaseUtil.foo();
  }
}

which of course is not going to compile.

Looks like a hole in the compiler (may be due to the static imports) here.

share|improve this answer
    
Which proves that there is no real static inheritance? It's just making it easier to type? –  Juan Mendes Nov 15 '12 at 23:42
    
True. The idea of inheritance only applies in case of objects (instances) not classes. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 15 '12 at 23:43
    
The question is: why can you can compile the version with import static com.example.util.Util.foo;? –  ShyJ Nov 15 '12 at 23:46
    
@Shyj because Util.foo isn't accesible outside the com.example.util package. –  Luiggi Mendoza Nov 15 '12 at 23:50
1  
@BheshGurung: what do you mean I "need to make it public"? i know what i can do in order to force it to work but it doesn't answer my question... also, whether you call it inheritance or hiding, in this particular example the result is the same. If I have a static method on a base class and the sub class has a static method with the same signature it overrides it. If the subclass doesn't have a static method with a matching signature, the method from the parent is "inherited" –  Andrey Nov 15 '12 at 23:52

Not quite the answer, but something else to consider when importing static functions.

When you are working with static functions/constants, they can sometimes get compiled in-line. This depends on which compiler you are using. I can't remember off the top of my head which ones.

This is a problem when you import the static variable/function from an external library, then upgrade that library at runtime, your code will still have the OLD static function in it.

My suggestion is to avoid static functions altogether, and instead use a singleton object. Use a framework such as spring to inject the singleton into your class at runtime.

It's good practice to make this object final, and use the constructor to set it.

This also makes testing easier as you can mock the singleton.

share|improve this answer
    
i like the idea of making it a singleton! to take it a step further, i would use an enum to implement it. –  Andrey Nov 16 '12 at 1:13

The first version of your code compiles effectively to

package com.example;

public class UtilTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        com.example.util.Util.bar();
        com.example.util.BaseUtil.foo();
    }
}

and since BaseUtil has package scope you can't call it from a different package and you get an exception.

The second version of your code compiles effectively to

package com.example;

public class UtilTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        com.example.util.Util.bar();
        com.example.util.Util.foo();
    }
}

Since Util is a public class you get access to all the methods including foo, since foo is visible to Util.

What puzzles me is why any of versions compile correctly?

share|improve this answer
    
@BheshGurung I compiled it both with JDK7 and Eclipse compiler. –  ShyJ Nov 16 '12 at 0:06
    
the 1st version shouldn't compile. another javac bug. –  irreputable Nov 16 '12 at 0:29
    
@BheshGurung: that's very interesting, what version of Java and which platform/OS are you using? –  Andrey Nov 16 '12 at 1:14
    
@Andrey: My bad. I thought ShyJ was talking about the first version in this answer. The first version in your OP of course compiles and fails at runtime. And that was my misunderstanding at first. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 16 '12 at 1:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.