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I am a beginner in Prolog and I figured I could try to write a simple test to check if a set of integers mod K (L) is a group. I started by trying to find if the said set is additive, ie. if the sum of every two elements of L is also an element of L.

I wrote the following:

group(A,K):-member(B,A),member(C,A),As is B+C, Bs is mod(As,K), member(Bs,A).

I then tried it with this:

trace. group([0,1,2],3).

This, naturally, produces all possible sums and, correctly, answers that the answer is true for all of them.

But after all these cases it finally prints the following:

  1    1  Redo: group([0,1,2],3) ? 
  6    2  Redo: member(1,[0,1,2]) ? 
  6    2  Fail: member(1,[0,1,2]) ? 
  1    1  Fail: group([0,1,2],3) ?
  no

Why the program checks this final case, that, to me, seems nonsensical?

The last case before this is:

  1    1  Redo: group([0,1,2],3) ? 
  6    2  Redo: member(0,[0,1,2]) ? 
  6    2  Fail: member(0,[0,1,2]) ? 
  3    2  Redo: member(1,[0,1,2]) ? 
  3    2  Exit: member(2,[0,1,2]) ? 
  4    2  Call: _158 is 2+2 ? 
  4    2  Exit: 4 is 2+2 ? 
  5    2  Call: _186 is 4 mod 3 ? 
  5    2  Exit: 1 is 4 mod 3 ? 
  6    2  Call: member(1,[0,1,2]) ? 
  6    2  Exit: member(1,[0,1,2]) ? 
  1    1  Exit: group([0,1,2],3) ? 

  true

which does what it should.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using a tracer for such a purpose is not very helpful. It shows you lots of detail that is irrelevant. Instead, concentrate on a good formulation of the problem. Concentrate on meaningful names. You use A for the set, and B and C for elements. That can be improved!

What you currently test is this:

There exist two elements of a set whose sum modulo K is in the same set.

What you want to test is that :

For all X, Y in S: ( (X+Y) mod K ) in S.

The operation itself can be written as:Z is (X+Y) mod K

How can a tracer explain that to you?

group(S, K) :-
   \+ (
         member(X,S), member(Y,S), Z is (X+Y) mod K,
         \+ member(Z,S)
   ).

?- group([0,1,2],3).
true.

?- group([0,2],3).
false.
share|improve this answer
    
I was using the tracer because I just found it and also thought that it might be able to reveal why the final answer is no, even though the correct answer should be yes. Also, it is true that I check if there exist two elements of a set whose sum modulo K is in the same set and it does this test, as far as I can see, correctly for all cases, but it does the last check that seems mysterious to me. @false –  Valtteri Nov 16 '12 at 0:34
1  
@Valtteri: The only thing that is mysterious is the sheer detail the tracer produces. It is not worth looking at. What is relevant is what your program means! –  false Nov 16 '12 at 0:47
    
Yes, you used negation in the solution. That is logical. Thank you. And desert69's answer explains why it makes that final no. At least I hope I got it right... –  Valtteri Nov 16 '12 at 0:49
1  
@Valtteri: The trace did not show anything negated. For, before it was not negated at all. The best is to look at answers (without tracer). And try out also cases like [0,2],3 where there should be no solution (but there used to be some...) –  false Nov 16 '12 at 1:06
    
The trace didn't show anything negated, but you use negation /+ in your solution, ie. test if there are sums that don't work and if there aren't, the answer is true. Also, if I use the case [0,2],3 , there are solutions to my original formulation, like (0,0). You are, of course, correct that the tracer is useless in this case because the problem is so obvious and using it threw me off in a way from the correct solution and made me concentrate on it, rather than my code. But I learned something new and posted here, so something good came of it! –  Valtteri Nov 16 '12 at 1:15

I think the tracer is showing you all the different branches the backtracer followed. For that, it seems to negate one of the successful statements from the last branch it tried, so this time it will go with a different solution.

Look at the whole execution, you certainly will see failed predicates that are really true, like Fail: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) in the second evaluation.

[trace]  ?- group([0, 1, 2], 3).
   Call: (6) group([0, 1, 2], 3) ? creep
   Call: (7) lists:member(_G718, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Call: (7) lists:member(_G718, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G721 is 0+0 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 0 is 0+0 ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G724 is 0 mod 3 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 0 is 0 mod 3 ? creep
   Call: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (6) group([0, 1, 2], 3) ? creep
true ;
   Redo: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Fail: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Redo: (7) lists:member(_G718, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G721 is 0+1 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 1 is 0+1 ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G724 is 1 mod 3 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 1 is 1 mod 3 ? creep
   Call: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (6) group([0, 1, 2], 3) ? creep
true ;
   Redo: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Fail: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Redo: (7) lists:member(_G718, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(2, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G721 is 0+2 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 2 is 0+2 ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G724 is 2 mod 3 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 2 is 2 mod 3 ? creep
   Call: (7) lists:member(2, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(2, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (6) group([0, 1, 2], 3) ? creep
true ;
   Redo: (7) lists:member(_G718, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Call: (7) lists:member(_G718, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G721 is 1+0 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 1 is 1+0 ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G724 is 1 mod 3 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 1 is 1 mod 3 ? creep
   Call: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (6) group([0, 1, 2], 3) ? creep
true ;
   Redo: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Fail: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Redo: (7) lists:member(_G718, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G721 is 1+1 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 2 is 1+1 ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G724 is 2 mod 3 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 2 is 2 mod 3 ? creep
   Call: (7) lists:member(2, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(2, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (6) group([0, 1, 2], 3) ? creep
true ;
   Redo: (7) lists:member(_G718, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(2, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G721 is 1+2 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 3 is 1+2 ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G724 is 3 mod 3 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 0 is 3 mod 3 ? creep
   Call: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (6) group([0, 1, 2], 3) ? creep
true ;
   Redo: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Fail: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Redo: (7) lists:member(_G718, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(2, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Call: (7) lists:member(_G718, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G721 is 2+0 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 2 is 2+0 ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G724 is 2 mod 3 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 2 is 2 mod 3 ? creep
   Call: (7) lists:member(2, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(2, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (6) group([0, 1, 2], 3) ? creep
true ;
   Redo: (7) lists:member(_G718, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G721 is 2+1 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 3 is 2+1 ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G724 is 3 mod 3 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 0 is 3 mod 3 ? creep
   Call: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (6) group([0, 1, 2], 3) ? creep
true ;
   Redo: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Fail: (7) lists:member(0, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Redo: (7) lists:member(_G718, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(2, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G721 is 2+2 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 4 is 2+2 ? creep
^  Call: (7) _G724 is 4 mod 3 ? creep
^  Exit: (7) 1 is 4 mod 3 ? creep
   Call: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Exit: (6) group([0, 1, 2], 3) ? creep
true ;
   Redo: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Fail: (7) lists:member(1, [0, 1, 2]) ? creep
   Fail: (6) group([0, 1, 2], 3) ? creep
false.
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I see. So at first it seeks out one solution (0,0), but then, because I asked if there are other solutions, it has to fail a correct solution from previous case to produce a test for another case, and finally it has to fail a crucial test and it answers no. Interesting and makes very much sense. Maybe I should test if there is a solution that doesn't belong to the set. But thank you for the answer.@desert69 –  Valtteri Nov 16 '12 at 0:45

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