Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an open SerialPort and receive data through the DataReceived event.

Is there any way to detect if the SerialPort gets disconnected?

I tried the ErrorReceived and PinChanged events but no luck.

In addition to that, SerialPort.IsOpen returns true when physically disconnected.

share|improve this question
    
Is this a USB-Serial adapter? –  Matt Burland Nov 16 '12 at 0:54
    
@Matt yes, it is a USB-Serial adapter. Thanks. –  Bruno Ligutti Nov 16 '12 at 15:31
4  
It isn't worth the hassle, most USB drivers deal with this very poorly. They just make the entire device disappear, even though you have a handle opened on it. This tends to end up poorly, an uncatchable exception in a worker thread is common. Or the worst kind, the driver doesn't even let you close the port, requiring a reboot. Same wisdom as jerking a flash drive out while Windows is writing to it: don't do it. Use "Safely remove hardware", the dialog should prompt the user to close your program. –  Hans Passant Nov 16 '12 at 16:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

USB-serial ports are a huge pain. See, for example, this question. I'm not sure whether it really was fixed with .NET 4.0, but back in the day I tried to deal with the problem of disconnections crashing the whole program with something like this:

public class SafeSerialPort : SerialPort
{
    private Stream theBaseStream;

    public SafeSerialPort(string portName, int baudRate, Parity parity, int dataBits, StopBits stopBits)
        : base(portName, baudRate, parity, dataBits, stopBits)
    {

    }

    public new void Open()
    {
        try
        {
            base.Open();
            theBaseStream = BaseStream;
            GC.SuppressFinalize(BaseStream);
        }
        catch
        {

        }
    }

    public new void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
    }

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (disposing && (base.Container != null))
        {
            base.Container.Dispose();               
        }
        try
        {
            if (theBaseStream.CanRead)
            {
                theBaseStream.Close();
                GC.ReRegisterForFinalize(theBaseStream);
            }
        }
        catch
        {
            // ignore exception - bug with USB - serial adapters.
        }
        base.Dispose(disposing);
    }
}

Apologies to whoever I adapted this from, it seems I failed to make a note of it in my code. The problem apparently stemmed from how .NET handled the underlying stream in the case of the serial port disappearing. It seemed you couldn't close the stream after the serial port is disconnected.

Another strategy I used was to create a small program that did just the serial communication part and exposed a WCF service for my main program to connect to. That way, when the USB-serial adapter flakes out and crashes the communication program, I can just automatically restart it from my main program.

Finally, I don't know why nobody ever marketed a locking USB port to avoid the whole accidental disconnection problem, especially with USB-serial adapters!

share|improve this answer

I also faced the problem of an unhandleable exception (and not being able to detect/circumvent the problem in code) as soon as the USB-Serial adapter had been disconnected. I can confirm that the solution from Mattt Burland works.

Simplified version:

class SafeSerialPort : SerialPort {
    public new void Open() {
        if (!base.IsOpen) {
            base.Open();
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this.BaseStream);
        }
    }

    public new void Close() {
        if (base.IsOpen) {
            GC.ReRegisterForFinalize(this.BaseStream);
            base.Close();   
        }           
    }

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing) {
        try {
            base.Dispose(disposing);
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            Debug.WriteLine(ex.Message);
        }

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
it doesnt work for me - this dispose method throws an exception "unhandled dispose..." –  Uri Abramson Jun 6 '13 at 11:19
    
Whats the exact exception/inner exception thrown? The line base.Dispose(disposing); is expected to throw an exception because of the SerialToUSB adapter, but it should be handled by the try/catch. –  Rev1.0 Jun 6 '13 at 11:31
    
the exception says "Safe handle has been closed". this probably happens because SerialStream.EventLoopRunner.WaitForCommResult(..) is running an internal loop which is trying to access the handle. How did you fix this issue? –  Uri Abramson Jun 6 '13 at 12:40
    
Its a Microsoft known issue. Here's a workaround for this: social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/netfxbcl/thread/… –  Uri Abramson Jun 6 '13 at 13:03

The problem is that IsOpen value is only set back to false when the Close method is executed.

You could try caputuring the WM_DEVICECHANGE message and using that.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa363480(v=vs.85).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't that just tell you if someone uninstalled the serial port itself? –  Jon B Nov 16 '12 at 15:55
    
@JonB in case of a Usb adapter my guess is that is what happens if you unplug the Usb device! –  Peter Sep 19 '13 at 7:50

If the device you're connecting to uses the CD pin, you can watch for that to change (other pins may apply for some devices using flow control). If not, then there isn't really a definitive way to do this.

Depending on the expected behavior of the connected device, you might want to implement a timeout or some kind of keep alive.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.