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So I'm just testing out some client-server stuff (I was working on it in a larger project but it kept throwing errors, so I decided to make sure I was doing it right. Turns out I wasn't) which involves ObjectOutput and Input streams. It works perfectly when I run client and server on localhost, but if I run server on my linux server and client on my computer, the connection has reset by the time I reach the line where the object is fetched. Here's the code:

Client:

    public static void main(String[] args){
    String[] stuff = {"test", "testing", "tester"};
    Socket s = null;
    ObjectOutputStream oos = null;
    try {
        s = new Socket("my.server.website", 60232);
        oos = new ObjectOutputStream(s.getOutputStream());
        oos.writeObject(stuff);
    } catch (UnknownHostException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally{
        try {
            s.close();
            oos.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {}


    }
}

Server:

    public static void main(String[] args){
    ServerSocket ss = null;
    Socket s = null;
    ObjectInputStream ois = null;
    try {
        ss = new ServerSocket(60232);
        s = ss.accept();
        System.out.println("Socket Accepted");
        ois = new ObjectInputStream(s.getInputStream());
        Object object = ois.readObject();
        System.out.println("Object received");
        if (object instanceof String[]){
        String[] components = (String[]) object;
        for (String string : components){
            System.out.println(string);
        }
        }
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }finally{
        try {
            ss.close();
            s.close();
            ois.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {}
    }
}
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the client, you are closing the underlying socket s before closing your output stream. Try this:

try {
    oos.close();
    s.close();
} catch (IOException e) {}

The oos.close() should cause the object output stream to flush all it's data to the socket and then close the object stream. Then you can close the underlying socket.

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Thanks, I can't believe it was something that simple! –  EnvisionRed Nov 16 '12 at 1:08
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