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Hi I have a Django function:

def get_spans(angle):
    spans = Spans.objects.values_list('span').filter(
        max_roof_angle=angle,
    )
    try:
        max_span = max(spans)
    except ValueError:
        max_span = 0
    return max_span

My question is - why does this return a tuple? How do I ensure I am getting a single, integer value back?

Any help much appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From the documentation: you can get a flat list using the arg flat=True. If you try to get the max from a list you would get a single value which you need

def get_spans(angle):
    spans = Spans.objects.values_list('span', flat=True).filter(
        max_roof_angle=angle,
    )
    max_span = max(spans)
    return max_span
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Ohyeah - forgot about that one. These seems like what Django wants me to do. –  Darwin Tech Nov 16 '12 at 1:12

Raunak already gave the proper answer for how to get the integer using value_list(), but I thought I might add that the reason why it returns a tuple is so that you can query multiple fields. Because Python doesn't treat single-element tuples like scalars, it would be inconsistent to return a scalar in some cases but a tuple in others.

But also, a better way to get the max would be to let the database calculate it for you, using aggregation. That way you can add db_index=True to the span field in your model and have the DB calculate the max in O(1) time. I can't really test it, but something like this should do the trick, I think:

from django.db.models import Max
def get_spans(angle):
    return Spans.objects.filter(max_roof_angle_exact=angle).aggregate(Max('span'))['span__max']
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ok - I also like this answer. It just came in a few seconds after I accepted though. –  Darwin Tech Nov 16 '12 at 1:14
    
Can you predict any performance gains to using this method over the one outlined by @Raunak Agarwal? –  Darwin Tech Nov 16 '12 at 1:15
    
Using max() on an unsorted list in Python is O(n), vs. O(1) for an indexed database lookup. If the list was sorted, max() in Python could be O(log(n)), but only if Python knew the list was sorted (but it doesn't). Also, keep in mind that the database has to return every record if you don't let it calculate the max for you. That's an O(n) increase in data transfer. It's unlikely to be detectable for a small dataset, but if you had a large dataset with hundreds queries per second, the difference could be massive. –  acjay Nov 16 '12 at 1:22

You can return max_span[0]

I would suggest checking that it isn't an empty tuple. So do the proper exception handling too.

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thanks. Yes - ther is exception handling - just left it out for conciseness. –  Darwin Tech Nov 16 '12 at 1:02

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