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I have a PHP application that is supposed to parse uploaded text files that has a format similar to this:

|                  |                |                  |
| -----------------------------------------------------|
| Sample           | Data           |                  |
| -----------------------------------------------------|
| Sample           | Data           |                  |
| -----------------------------------------------------|
| Sample           | Data           |                  |
| -----------------------------------------------------|


| Accepts                    |                            |
| --------------------------------------------------------|
| All                        | Yes                        |
| --------------------------------------------------------|
| More                       | Yes                        |
| --------------------------------------------------------|


|            |            | Years      |            |            |
| ---------------------------------------------------------------|
| 1998       | 1999       | 2000       | 2001       | 2002       |
| ---------------------------------------------------------------|
| 2003       | 2004       | 2005       | 2006       | 2007       |
| ---------------------------------------------------------------|
| 2008       | 2009       | 2010       | 2011       | 2012       |
| ---------------------------------------------------------------|

What I need to do is basically isolate each "block" by itself in the same order, so I can loop them one-by-one. A "solution" could be doing

preg_split("/\n{4,}/", $text);

However that would produce unwated results if the person submitting the text decides that the unnecessary newlines doesn't belong and removes them. I tried playing around with preg_match_all(), but it has been years since I did any real regex, so I couldn't come up with a usable solution.

The first line of a "block" always contains | and spaces, but fields may contain text. The last line of a "block" is always a pipe followed by a space, dashes to fill the row, ending with a |.

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I suppose if you cannot reliably split on '/\n{2,}/' or '/\n(\s*\n)+/', you cannot reliably split at all. If one "table" follows the next one without an empty line in between, there might also be two consecutive tables with the same column number and width, in which case they might not even be distinguishable manually. –  Martin Büttner Nov 16 '12 at 1:12
    
You could detect the blocks if there were reliable title lines. But your sample is too abstract to tell. –  mario Nov 16 '12 at 1:31
    
There are no consistency with titles, some blocks have titles, some doesn't. The content are dynamic (different sets, languages, etc), but the size of the blocks are constant. Like in the example above, that's the exact "expected" input. –  M. A. Nov 16 '12 at 2:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If this is how the content of the text file looks like I would write something like

$pat = '~
    (?<=^|\r{3}|\n{3}|(\r\n){3})    # beginning of string or following 3 newline chars
        \|[ ]                       # a pipe and a space
        (
            [ \S]+                      # 1 or more space or non space char
            \|                          # a pipe
        )+                          # 1 or more of this group

        (\n|\r\n?)                  # a newline
        \|[ ]-+\|                   # a pipe, a space, multiple dashes and a pipe
        (\n|\r\n?)                  # a newline
        .*?                         # anything between newlines above and below
        (\n|\r\n?)                  # a newline
        \|[ ]-+\|                   # a pipe, a space, multiple dashes and a pipe
    (?=$|\r{3}|\n{3}|(\r\n){3})     # end of string or followed by 3 newline chars
~sx';
preg_match_all($pat,$str,$res);
$blocks = $res[0];
print_r($blocks);

I'm not sure if this is the most elegant or even reliable way, though, since it's hard to guess what exactly the content might look like.

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I've been testing this pattern with various possible input data, and so far it has done EXACTLY what I was looking for! Thank you for this! –  M. A. Nov 16 '12 at 5:04
    
@M.A. Though I'm questioning (even when I was writing the pattern), isn't there a possibility that a user input might look identical to the last part of the block, breaking the pattern? In such a case you might want to extend the pattern in the lookbehind and lookahead sections. And this is, unless you're escaping pipes in user input or converting them into HTML entities. –  inhan Nov 16 '12 at 5:59
    
The input data is actually files. While a user might remove unnecessary newlines - and they really do have a habit of appearing in these files - the data itself will remain untouched. The blocks follows a set of rules which will immediately notice if something is out of order. I needed a pattern that would make sure the blocks are isolated, based on the layout of the blocks (which are constant, disregarding the width and height), rather than for example multiple newlines. –  M. A. Nov 16 '12 at 9:20
    
@M.A. So I'm glad it (apparently?) works :) –  inhan Nov 16 '12 at 17:36

Your problem is impossible to solve, since you have no reliable way of distinguishing between a normal line of a block, and the first or last line of a block.

I'm all for the robustness principle, but this is one of those situations where you just have to train your users not to mangle the data. You couldn't accept CSV formatted data from users in which they had arbitrarily deleted commas, and it's basically the same scenario here.

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You're right. I might be focusing so much on user friendliness I've lost sight of whats operable –  M. A. Nov 16 '12 at 2:44

To match optional newlines, try using '/\n(\n{1,})?/'. This matches the first newline and then will match any additional line if exists.

Considering this, your answer would be:

preg_split("/\n(\n{1,})?/", $text).

This will split the text by newline(s).

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