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If I have:

Some text



More text






Even more text

What is the more elegant way to obtain:

Some text

More text

Even more text

All with knowing the number of repeated tokens

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don't use regex if you are looking for \r\n since new lines are actually specially handled. –  DevelopingChris Aug 27 '09 at 13:00
1  
Do you actually have "\r\n" literals in your string or do you have newlines? –  Andrew Hare Aug 27 '09 at 13:03
    
Judging by the accepted answer it seems clear that you have newlines rather than literal "\r\n" strings in your input. –  Andrew Hare Aug 27 '09 at 13:33

9 Answers 9

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The method to do so using regular expressions would be

string replaced = System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex
    .Replace(input, @"(?:\r\n)+", "\r\n");

(The (?:...) syntax is a non-capturing group, which can be replaced with a capturing group (just (...)), but that is slightly less efficient and not more readable, IMO.)

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Perhaps something like:

var result = string.Join("\r\n", s.Split(new[]{"\r\n"}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries))
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I like this one better than regex, its clever, and declarative. –  DevelopingChris Aug 27 '09 at 12:59
    
This one is far more wordy, and with such a simple regex, how is this more declarative? The regex version is almost literally "replace every repeated instance of \r\n with a single instance of \r\n". –  Sean Aug 27 '09 at 13:08

Use regular expressions. Match the entire string '\r\n' and replace with a single '\r\n'

The function you need:

pattern = "(\\r\\n)+";
Regex rgx = new Regex(pattern);

newString = rgx.Replace(oldString, "\r\n");

EDIT: Apologies for missing the + earlier

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1  
not sure this works since it would replace every new line with a new line, not condense them. you need a plus in your pattern –  DevelopingChris Aug 27 '09 at 13:05

I don't know C# syntax, but just use a simple regex to replace (\r\n)+ with (\r\n)

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You can use a regular expression:

str = Regex.Replace(str, "(\r\n)+", "\r\n")

Another way could be to split on the line breaks removing empty entries, then join again:

str = String.Join("\r\n", str.Split(new string[]{"\r\n"}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

Consider if you should use the string literal "\r\n" or the Environment.NewLine constant. That depends on where the data comes from.

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If the \r\n means what it usually does, you're replacing successive blank lines with a single blank line.

I'm sure there are tools for that purpose. I wouldn't know about C#, though.

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The fastest way:

Regex reg = new Regex(@"(\r\n)+");

string replacedString = reg.Replace("YOUR STRING TO BE REPLACED", Environment.NewLine);
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Just a few days ago, there was nearly the same question around here in SO. There was not a NewLine the problem, instead it where whitespaces.

There was also the one guys who prefers the Split, Join method and the other site using a regex. So Jon made a comparison between both and it came out that a compile regex was much faster.

But i just can't find this question again...

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Without Regexs (which make my head hurt)

string RemoveRepeated(string needle, string haystack)
{
    string doubleNeedle = needle + needle;

    while (haystack.IndexOf(doubleNeedle) >= 0)
        haystack = haystack.Replace(doubleNeedle, needle);
    return haystack;
}

With fewer memory allocations

string RemoveRepeated(string needle, string haystack)
{
    if (needle == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("needle");

    if (haystack == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("haystack");

    if (needle == string.Empty || haystack == string.Empty)
        return haystack;

    string doubleNeedle = needle + needle;
    var buffer = new StringBuilder(haystack);
    int originalLength;
    do
    {
        originalLength = buffer.Length;
        buffer.Replace(doubleNeedle, needle);
    } while (originalLength != buffer.Length);

    return buffer.ToString();
}

Initial checks are equally valid in the first version too

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As strings are immutable in C#, the above is actually an infinite loop if the string contains a doubleNeedle. –  Bojan Resnik Aug 27 '09 at 13:04
    
@Bojan: Yes, I posted it before I tested it, now corrected :) –  Binary Worrier Aug 27 '09 at 13:06
    
This will be slow as it does many iterations over the string. See the other answers. –  Martin Konicek Jun 16 '12 at 21:38
1  
@martin: Really? Have you measured it? If so how much slower? and the most important question, does it matter? There are faster implementations, but if this is on the post of a web page and you're sanitising use input, does it actually matter? Probably not. If you have a 32k string with many thousands of needles to hit & replace, then yes, it probably matters then. –  Binary Worrier Jun 18 '12 at 7:07

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