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I have a function that places 'z' amount of bombs randomly scattered across a 10x10 grid. It looks something like this ("b" represents where the bombs are located.) I need to place a number representing how many bombs there are next to the "0" (including diagonals), and I am not sure how to do that.

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 b 0
b 0 0 b 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 b 0 0 0
0 0 0 b 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 b 0 0 0 0 0 0 b
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 b 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 b 0 b 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 

from random import*
mat1 = []
mat2 = []

def makemat(x):
    for y in range(x):
        list1 = []
        list2 = []
        for z in range(x):
            list1.append(0)
            list2.append("-")
        mat1.append(list1)
        mat2.append(list2)
makemat(5)



def printmat(mat):
    for a in range(len(mat)):
        for b in range(len(mat)):
            print(str(mat[a][b]) + "\t",end="")
        print("\t")



def addmines(z):
    count = 0
    while (count < z):
        x = randrange(0,len(mat1))       
        y = randrange(0,len(mat1))      
        if mat1[y][x] == "b":
            count -= 1
        else:
            mat1[y][x] = "b"
        count += 1
    printmat(mat1)
addmines(10)

This is the function I tried for placing the numbers:

def addscores():
    for x in range(len(mat1)):
        for y in range(len(mat1)):
            if mat1[y][x] != "b":
                if mat1[y+1][x] == "b":
                    mat1[y][x] = 1 
                if mat1[y-1][x] == "b":
                    mat1[y][x] = 1                  #...ETC
            else:
                mat1[y][x] == "b"
addscores()

I keep getting the error list index out of range. How can I resolve this?

share|improve this question
1  
Might I suggest using a numpy array to store your board? Then to check nearest neighbours, you can use a simple array slice and not have to worry about the boundary conditions. –  wim Nov 16 '12 at 1:35
1  
In Python, it doesn't make sense to loop over indices of a list. Loop over the list itself. –  Lattyware Nov 16 '12 at 1:38
    
As an extra note, that applies even if you need neighbouring items - something like that could be expanded to give more items, although as wim said, numpy might be easier. –  Lattyware Nov 16 '12 at 1:45

4 Answers 4

Let's say that (x, y) = (9, 9), you get the IndexError because you do:

if mat1[y+1][x] == "b":

which tries to access the index mat1[10], which doesn't exists because your list is only 10 elements long.

Also, let's say that (x, y) = (0, 0). Then when you do:

if mat1[y-1][x] == "b":

You access the index mat[-1], which is equivalent to mat[9]. I'm pretty sure this is not what you intend.

There are 2 easy ways to correct this:

1) Include an additional set of if statements to ensure that you don't attempt to access list elements outside the bounds of the list:

Change:

            if mat1[y+1][x] == "b":
                mat1[y][x] = 1 
            if mat1[y-1][x] == "b":
                mat1[y][x] = 1      

To:

            #parentheses in if statements added for clarity
            if (y < len(mat1) - 1) and (mat1[y+1][x] == "b"):
                mat1[y][x] = 1 
            if (y > 0) and (mat1[y-1][x] == "b"):
                mat1[y][x] = 1    

2) This is the method I prefer. Add a layer of "padding" around the array. When you first create your array, do:

WIDTH = 10
HEIGHT = 10

myMap = [[0 for i in range(WIDTH + 2)] for j in range(HEIGHT + 2)]

Then, when you access elements in your array, just make sure that you are indexing from 1, not 0:

#do this
firstElement = myMap[1][1]

#not this
firstElement = mayMap[0][0]

#do this
for i in range(1, len(myMap) - 1): pass

#not this
for i in range(len(myMap)): pass  
share|improve this answer

change

if mat1[y+1][x] == "b":

to

if safeEquals(mat1, y+1, x, "b"):

and define safeEquals as

def safeEquals(mat, y, x, value):
    try:
        return mat1[y][x] == "b"
    except IndexError as e:
        return False

This essentially allows you to provide a default behaviour if you index outside the map position.

PS the code executed after the condition:

mat1[y][x] = 1 

should be

mat1[y][x] += 1 

as presence of an adjacent bomb increments the bomb counter (otherwise how does a 3 ever appear on the map_

share|improve this answer
    
Format your code using the {} button in the response editor. –  Joel Cornett Nov 16 '12 at 1:46

An easy way to avoid the index errors is to use defaultdict to hold mat1 and mat2. As a bonus the code is shorter :)

from random import randrange
from collections import defaultdict
mat1 = defaultdict(int)
mat2 = defaultdict(lambda:"-")
size = 5

def printmat(mat):
    for a in range(size):
        print("\t".join(str(mat[a, b]) for b in range(size)))


def addmines(count):
    while (count):
        x = randrange(0,size)       
        y = randrange(0,size)      
        if mat1[y, x] != "b":
            mat1[y, x] = "b"
            count -= 1
    printmat(mat1)
addmines(10)

def addscores():
    for x in range(size):
        for y in range(size):
            if mat1[y, x] != "b":
                if mat1[y+1, x] == "b":
                    mat1[y, x] = 1                  # should be +=
                if mat1[y-1, x] == "b":
                    mat1[y, x] = 1                  #...ETC
            else:
                mat1[y, x] == "b"
addscores()
share|improve this answer

if y is in range(len(mat1)) then y+1 is not...

share|improve this answer
    
Is this supposed to be executable python? –  Martijn Pieters Nov 16 '12 at 9:28
    
no, this is a sentence in english :-) –  Zdravko Danev Nov 16 '12 at 12:58

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