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So I'm trying out the Google Closure Compiler and I've notice that it switches all my equality parameters so that the variables are always on the right side of the comparison.

So now instead of typeof XMLHttpRequest=="undefined" I have "undefined"==typeof XMLHttpRequest and I have if(null!==a) instead of if(a!==null), just as some examples.

I know they accomplish the same thing, but it's just not the style I'm used to. Is there some sort of benefit that you get for having these switched? I can't see how there would be.

Can someone explain to me why the Closure Compiler decides to do this? Is it just a preference of whoever wrote that part of Closure?

Edit: To clarify, people are telling me why it might be considered good coding practice. That's fine, but this is after compilation. Is there a performance benefit or is the Closure Compiler just trying to prove a point?

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1  
asked many times in different forms on SO –  Mitch Wheat Nov 16 '12 at 1:42
2  
Ah, good ol' Yoda conditions... –  zzzzBov Nov 16 '12 at 1:44
    
Actually, this is not the same as the more general yoda condition question, please read the question carefully before answering/commenting/voting. –  Joachim Sauer Nov 16 '12 at 9:02

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The compiler switches the order for a very simple reason: it compresses better with gzip. The compiler doesn't care a wit about improving comprehension or making it easier to edit. By switching the order common comparisons such as "if (x == null) ... if (y == null) ..." become "if (null == x) ... if (null == y) ..." Gzip finds "if (null ==" and is able to replace it with a single token. It isn't a big improvement, but it adds up in a large code base.

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That would make sense. I later read about void 0 replacing undefined in the advanced optimizer mode purely for size/compression purposes. I'll mark this as the answer, although if you could actually show that gzip compresses better with the operands switched that would be even better! –  Nathan Nov 16 '12 at 8:25
    
@John can you provide a link or some more details? Sounds bizarre, but I'd love to learn more! –  John3136 Nov 16 '12 at 10:34
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Here's the issue: code.google.com/p/closure-compiler/issues/detail?id=461. Enhancements like this are tested on Google's code base (pretty much every major product such as maps and gmail). –  Chad Killingsworth Nov 16 '12 at 11:50
    
@John3136 I don't know a lot about gzip, but upon reflection it makes sense that it would compress better if you had the code repeated across a large codebase. Consider the strings typeof objectA=="undefined" and typeof objectB=="undefined", we'd need to compress 2 non-unique strings typeof object and =="undefined". If you rearrange it, you can get that down to a single non-unique string "undefined"==typeof object. –  Nathan Nov 19 '12 at 1:51
    
@Nathan so from gzip POV it's more about the consistency than the actual order? That does make sense. –  John3136 Nov 19 '12 at 2:15

Commonly done in languages like C / C++ so you can't accidently do

if (a = null) {
    // sets a to null and everyone is happy.
    // but probably meant to check if a is null or not.
    // via (a == null)
}

if (null = a) {
    // won't compile
}
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It's also used in Java to prevent throwing a NullPointerException in situations like this: "foo".equals(someString); –  jahroy Nov 16 '12 at 1:44
8  
It's worth mentioning that any decent compiler (or lint-style tool in case of a scripting language) will display a warning when using if(a = null) unless you explicitely state your intent by using if((a = null)) –  ThiefMaster Nov 16 '12 at 1:45
    
Hi John, I'm wondering if you could perhaps address the follow-up comment I made to alex's answer. Thanks for the answer, but I'm wondering why Closure does this. Closure compiles the code into this format, if there was a mistake like (a=1) in my original code, I'm sure Closure would probably just leave it there because (a=1) is still valid code. Why does it matter for compiled code to have the operands ordered in such a way? I don't think a sane coder would ever want to work on the compiled code again when they could refer to the source. –  Nathan Nov 16 '12 at 4:07
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Don't know enough about Closure to give a reliable answer, but: if (1=a) is not valid JS, and so the compiled code wouldn't run. You're more likely to find the bug than if you have if (a=1) which does run, but doesn't produce the correct results.. –  John3136 Nov 16 '12 at 4:55
    
@John3136 thanks, I appreciate you getting back to me. It looks like the most plausible explanation is simply that gzip supposedly compresses better with the operands switched. –  Nathan Nov 16 '12 at 8:28

Yes, you can't assign to a constant, and == is easy to mistype (sometimes you may forget one, and use =).

For example, what's the difference between...

if (a == 1) { }

...and...

if (a = 1) { }

? The second one will always evaluate to true, not matter what the value of a.

If you flip the LHS and RHS, you can see the immediate benefit...

if (1 == a) { }

...will work as expected and...

if (1 = a) { }

...will fail, as you can't assign to a constant.

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Thanks for the answer, but I'm wondering why Closure does this. Closure compiles the code into this format, if there was a mistake like (a=1) in my original code, I'm sure Closure would probably just leave it there because (a=1) is still valid code. Why does it matter for compiled code to have the operands ordered in such a way? I don't think a sane coder would ever want to work on the compiled code again when they could refer to the source. –  Nathan Nov 16 '12 at 1:54

The reason I know is is done to prevent

if (x = 5) { }

If you reverse it to

if (5 = x) { }

You would get a compiler error.

But if you write it as

if (5 == x) { }

It will compile fine.

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My brain parses

if( x < y )

slightly faster than

if( y > x )

probably because real axis is always oriented from left to right, thus making condition easier to visualize.

However, in java it is more practical to write

if( "string".equals(x) ) {...

as opposed to "more natural"

if( x.equals("string") ) {...

to eliminate any opportunity for NPE.

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It doesn't do any good to say probably. Do some benchmarks and find out. –  alex Nov 16 '12 at 1:54
3  
@alex benchmarks on the human brain? I think that's what Tegiri was referring to. In the same way, my brain understands "x == 1" faster than it does "1 == x". –  Nathan Nov 16 '12 at 1:57
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And programmer's mind is all that really matters -- because compilers can be fixed. –  Tegiri Nenashi Nov 16 '12 at 2:01
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@Nathan Right, I didn't read the answer as thoroughly as I thought. –  alex Nov 16 '12 at 2:01

Just a cheap replacement of static analysis of particular case of common mistake/

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So essentially you're saying the compiler is partially delinting the code first, even if that serves no purpose to the end result? That's plausible I guess, the lint utilities were probably done before the compiler. –  Nathan Nov 16 '12 at 5:00
    
I think so, cause in common case at low level value appears at proccessor's (or may be some kind interpretator alternative) register and is compared via opcode –  Yuriy Vikulov Nov 16 '12 at 9:42
    
For examlpe, you cannot make such mistake in c#, but you can in c++ or c –  Yuriy Vikulov Nov 16 '12 at 9:45

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