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Given the following class structure:

class Foo {
    protected static $_things = ['thing'];
}

class Bar extends Foo {
    protected static $_things = [
        'thing', 'other-thing'
    ];
}

class Baz extends Bar {
    protected static $_things = [
        'thing', 'other-thing', 'something-else'
    ];
}

class Quux extends Baz {
    // Note the lack of "other-thing"
    protected static $_things = [
        'thing', 'something-else', 'one-more'
    ];
}

What would be the best way to refactor this and keep the array elements more DRY? For example, the "thing" element should only be defined once (in Foo), the "other-thing" element should only be define once (in Bar), and so on.

In practice, this array is very large, and there can sometimes be up to 4 or 5 levels of inheritance, each needing to "modify" this array in some special way, whether that's adding or removing elements.

I've been toying with the idea of initialization methods that would do the appropriate modifications, but wanted to see if there were any better ways first.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Simplest solution I can think of (heavily based on the singleton pattern).

I don't think there is any compile-time way to do what you are looking for.

<?php
class A {
    private static $a = [1, 2, 3];
    public static function getA() {
        return self::$a;
    }
}

class B extends A {
    private static $a = null;
    public static function getA() {
        if (self::$a === null)
            self::$a = array_merge(A::getA(), [4, 5, 6]);
        return self::$a;
    }
}

echo join(',', B::getA()) . "\n";
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion. This is actually very similar to what I had been toying around with, only I was doing the merges in the constructor instead of the getter. –  drrcknlsn Nov 16 '12 at 3:18

It's a bit hard to judge not knowing the use case exactly, but inheritance seems like the wrong approach for this. Anyway you need to separate the way the data is stored and the way it's accessed, i.e. separate the data structure from the data model.

Best solution would be to create a separate list class and use that in the several clients. e.g. something like:

class SomeList{
    private $_things = ['thing'];
    function mergeItems( $items ){
        //merge the $this->_things and $items arrays uniquely
        //...
    }
}

class Foo{
    private $list;

    function __construct( $list ){
        $this->list = $list;
        $this->list->mergeItems( ['thing', 'other-thing'] );
    }
}

You should never store state in static properties

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the reply, but the property is not storing state. Each class has a constant/immutable array of acceptable elements for this property. Once they're initialized, they are never changed. The problems I'm having are that 1) PHP doesn't have any way to define an immutable array, and 2) I'd like to keep the data DRY. I currently just override the array in each class, and repeat the relevant elements from the parent classes' arrays. This works fine, but it's a pain to maintain, since modifying one of the elements in a base class requires modifying every child class as well. –  drrcknlsn Nov 16 '12 at 18:26
    
If the data is immutable, then you've got all the more reason to encapsulate the array and shield it off from mutation. Obviously the list clients can store the list instance statically if that is what you really want. However you need to ask yourself whether it is really necessary that they're static. (And also whether the inheritance is necessary. Inheritance is only rarely warranted. And inheritance chains are almost always a very bad code smell) –  Creynders Nov 17 '12 at 10:34

Maybe something like this will work:

class Foo {
    protected static $_things = ['thing'];
}

class Bar extends Foo {
    protected static $_things = array_merge($_things, ['other-thing']);
}

//and so on...
share|improve this answer
    
No, php does not allow anything else than literals in static definition (actually, it won't even PARSE it). –  Maël Nison Nov 16 '12 at 3:02

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