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There is a m*n Matrix.

From one point of the matrix, you can move to one of the eight adjacent points (up, down, left, right, upper left, lower left, upper right, lower right)

If the point in one direction has been visited, you can continue to move to the next unvisited point in this direction.

You cann't visit a point which has been visited, but you can pass through the visited adjacent point to visit other un-visited point.

For example, the current point is (5,5):

  1. If (5,4) has been visted, you can move to (5,3). If (5,3) is also visited, you can move the (5,2).
  2. The same as the diagonal direction. If (4,4) has been visited, you can be move to(3,3) and so on.

Now you need to visit all the points on the matrix, how many ways there are?

(The first and last point can be any point).

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1  
I'd say a plenty. For example, take a 1*n matrix. Every possible path selection forms a correct sequence, totaling 2^(n-1) total combination. Now if you just add second row, things get too complicated already (for me at least). I'd assume 2^(n*m-1) as an answer, though, but no proof. –  Vesper Nov 16 '12 at 7:53
1  
When m=n=2, there are 4 points. The result is 4!=24. Therefore, 2^(m*n-1)=2^3=8 is wrong. –  fanjindou Nov 16 '12 at 8:22
    
Let me make it explicit. You mean "path (sequence of cells) that visit every cell, starting from a given (x,y) point, and do not overlap with itself"? It you really mean this, it's rather tricky and I'll only look into it after you confirm. –  Billiska Nov 16 '12 at 11:32
    
@Billiska We need to find the number of paths that visit every cell, starting from any point. The visited point cann't be visited again. But we can pass through the visited point A to visit the adjacent point which is in the same direction with A. –  fanjindou Nov 16 '12 at 13:27
    
When you say "pass through A". Do you mean if I'm at (5,5) and (5,6) is already visited, I can pass through (5,6) and visit (5,7) next? –  Billiska Nov 16 '12 at 13:39

2 Answers 2

This is similar to the number of Greek-key tours on a board / AKA number of self-avoiding walks (see Wikipedia) on a grid.

But in your variation, you can move to 8 directions, instead of 4.

For the original version, It seems that there is no known formula for large values of n. It is explained here and here.

I implemented a short C++ program to count it for your case (not the most efficient one, I guess):

const size_t _DIM_m= 4; // cols
const size_t _DIM_n= 4; // rows

typedef struct // we want to pass the array by value (for recursion), so we'll wrap it with a struct
{
    bool g[_DIM_m][_DIM_n];
} Grid;

int Traverse(Grid g, int i, int j, int nVisit= 0)
{
    int nWays= 0;

    ++nVisit;        // points visited so far
    g.g[i][j]= true;
    Grid h= g;

    // original problem:
    if (                   (0        != j) && (!g.g[i  ][j-1])) nWays+= Traverse(g, i  , j-1, nVisit); // up
    if (                   (_DIM_n-1 != j) && (!g.g[i  ][j+1])) nWays+= Traverse(g, i  , j+1, nVisit); // down
    if ((0        != i)                    && (!g.g[i-1][j  ])) nWays+= Traverse(g, i-1, j  , nVisit); // left
    if ((_DIM_m-1 != i)                    && (!g.g[i+1][j  ])) nWays+= Traverse(g, i+1, j  , nVisit); // right

    // additions for your problem:
    if ((_DIM_m-1 != i) && (0        != j) && (!g.g[i+1][j-1])) nWays+= Traverse(g, i+1, j-1, nVisit); // upper right
    if ((0        != i) && (_DIM_n-1 != j) && (!g.g[i-1][j+1])) nWays+= Traverse(g, i-1, j+1, nVisit); // lower left
    if ((0        != i) && (0        != j) && (!g.g[i-1][j-1])) nWays+= Traverse(g, i-1, j-1, nVisit); // upper left
    if ((_DIM_m-1 != i) && (_DIM_n-1 != j) && (!g.g[i+1][j+1])) nWays+= Traverse(g, i+1, j+1, nVisit); // lower right

    if (_DIM_m * _DIM_n == nVisit) ++nWays; // if all points visited
    return nWays;
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    Grid g;

    for (size_t i= 0; i<_DIM_m; i++)
        for (size_t j= 0; j<_DIM_n; j++)
            g.g[i][j]= false;

    int nWays= Traverse(g, 0, 0); // starting point: 0, 0

    cout << nWays << endl;
    system ("pause");

    return 0;
}

The results for a rectangular grid, starting from (0,0):

  • _DIM= 1: 1
  • _DIM= 2: 6
  • _DIM= 3: 138
  • _DIM= 4: 37948
  • _DIM= 5: a lot...

Note that the results changes when starting from a different point.

Edit:

Original question was modified: pass-through was added. Here is a solution for this case:

const size_t _DIM_m= 4; // cols
const size_t _DIM_n= 4; // rows

typedef struct // we want to pass the array by value (for recursion), so we'll wrap it with a struct
{
    bool g[_DIM_m][_DIM_n];
} Grid;

inline bool InRange(int i, int j)
{
    return (i >= 0) && (i < _DIM_m) && (j >= 0) && (j < _DIM_n);
}

int Traverse(Grid g, int i, int j, int nVisit= 0)
{
    int nWays= 0;

    ++nVisit;        // points visited so far
    g.g[i][j]= true;
    Grid h= g;

    int i1,j1;

    i1= i; j1= j;
    do { --j1;       } while (InRange(i1,j1) && (g.g[i1][j1]));                    // up          (pass through)
    if                       (InRange(i1,j1)) nWays+= Traverse(g, i1, j1, nVisit);

    i1= i; j1= j;
    do { ++j1;       } while (InRange(i1,j1) && (g.g[i1][j1]));                    // down        (pass through)
    if                       (InRange(i1,j1)) nWays+= Traverse(g, i1, j1, nVisit);

    i1= i; j1= j;
    do { --i1;       } while (InRange(i1,j1) && (g.g[i1][j1]));                    // left        (pass through)
    if                       (InRange(i1,j1)) nWays+= Traverse(g, i1, j1, nVisit);

    i1= i; j1= j;
    do { ++i1;       } while (InRange(i1,j1) && (g.g[i1][j1]));                    // right       (pass through)
    if                       (InRange(i1,j1)) nWays+= Traverse(g, i1, j1, nVisit);

    i1= i; j1= j;
    do { ++i1; --j1; } while (InRange(i1,j1) && (g.g[i1][j1]));                    // upper right (pass through)
    if                       (InRange(i1,j1)) nWays+= Traverse(g, i1, j1, nVisit);

    i1= i; j1= j;
    do { --i1; ++j1; } while (InRange(i1,j1) && (g.g[i1][j1]));                    // lower left  (pass through)
    if                       (InRange(i1,j1)) nWays+= Traverse(g, i1, j1, nVisit);

    i1= i; j1= j;
    do { --i1; --j1; } while (InRange(i1,j1) && (g.g[i1][j1]));                    // upper left  (pass through)
    if                       (InRange(i1,j1)) nWays+= Traverse(g, i1, j1, nVisit);

    i1= i; j1= j;
    do { ++i1; ++j1; } while (InRange(i1,j1) && (g.g[i1][j1]));                    // lower right (pass through)
    if                       (InRange(i1,j1)) nWays+= Traverse(g, i1, j1, nVisit);

    if (_DIM_m * _DIM_n == nVisit) ++nWays; // if all points visited
    return nWays;
}

The results for a rectangular grid, starting from (0,0):

  • _DIM= 1: 1
  • _DIM= 2: 6
  • _DIM= 3: 1020
  • _DIM= 4: 8071182
  • _DIM= 5: a lot...
share|improve this answer
    
There are some differences between Greek-key tours and this problem. In this problem, you not only can move to the eight adjacent points, but also you can move to eight adjacent points of the eight adjacent points. (0,0) can move to (1,1). If(1,1) is visited, (0,0) can move to (2,2). If (1,1) and (2,2) are visited, (0,0) can move to (3,3)... –  fanjindou Nov 16 '12 at 13:40
    
@fanjindou: OK, I see that you edited the your questions.... I'll edit my answer accordingly... –  Lior Kogan Nov 16 '12 at 13:42
    
I think your algorithm is a dfs algorithm. When m*n is very big, it will take a very long time to solve the problem. –  fanjindou Nov 16 '12 at 13:48
    
@fanjindou: Right; this is just a proof of concept. –  Lior Kogan Nov 16 '12 at 13:57

Sounds like a typical TSP problem (see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Travelling_salesman_problem ). Each box e.g. 5,5 is like a city and there are only 'roads' or links which can reach another node or 'city'. Hope that helps ya

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3  
Literally has nothing to do with traveling salesman, which is an optimization problem. –  Justin L. Nov 16 '12 at 7:15
    
Moreover, tsp problems can be encoded in an acyclic graph and stored in a zdd , which can return the total #of combinations. Donald knuth christmas tree lecture addressed this type of problem specifically with an example such that a car visits each state one time, via a highway. Seems very similar as this specifically can return the count via a graph representation. I thought the association would be helpful if nothing else.. –  Jeremy Adsitt Nov 17 '12 at 7:00
    
I'm sorry, my comment was unnecessarily rude :( I'm not sure what came over me that day. –  Justin L. Nov 18 '12 at 8:57

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