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I have a while (!Queue.empty()) loop that processes a queue of elements. There are a series of pattern matchers going from highest-priority to lowest-priority order. When a pattern is matched, the corresponding element is removed from the queue, and matching is restarted from the top (so that the highest-priority matchers get a chance to act first).

So right now it looks something like this (a simplified version):

while (!Queue.empty())
{
    auto & Element = *Queue.begin();

    if (MatchesPatternA(Element)) {    // Highest priority, since it's first
        // Act on it
        // Remove Element from queue
        continue;
    }
    if (MatchesPatternB(Element)) {
        // Act on it
        // Remove Element from queue
        continue;
    }
    if (MatchesPatternC(Element)) {    // Lowest priority, since it's last
        // Act on it
        // Remove Element from queue
        continue;
    }

    // If we got this far, that means no pattern was matched, so
    // Remove Element from queue
}

This works, but I want to refactor this loop in some way to remove the use of the keyword continue.

Why? Because if I want to outsource a pattern matching to an external function, it obviously breaks. E.g.

void ExternalMatching(...)
{
    if (MatchesPatternB(Element)) {
        // Act on it
        // Remove Element from queue
        continue;     // This won't work here
    }
}

while (!Queue.empty())
{
    auto & Element = *Queue.begin();

    if (MatchesPatternA(Element)) {
        // Act on it
        // Remove Element from queue
        continue;
    }
    ExternalMatching(...);
    if (MatchesPatternC(Element)) {
        // Act on it
        // Remove Element from queue
        continue;
    }

    // If we got this far, that means no pattern was matched, so
    // Remove Element from queue
}

I don't want to have to write repetitive if statements like if (ExternalMatching(...)) { ... continue; }, I'd rather find a cleaner way to express this logic.

This simplified example might make it seem like a good idea to make pattern matching more general rather than having distinct MatchesPatternA, MatchesPatternB, MatchesPatternC, etc. functions. But in my situation the patterns are quite complicated, and I'm not quite ready to generalize them yet. So I want to keep that part as is, separate functions.

Any elegant ideas? Thank you!

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5  
Uh, change the ifs to else ifs and wrap the final bit in an else? This is basically what you're doing with continue. –  Yuushi Nov 16 '12 at 4:42
    
Hmm, either you're right, or perhaps my simplified example is too simplified, making this viable here and not in my real problem. Let me find out which. –  Dmitri Shuralyov Nov 16 '12 at 4:44
    
Ok, so my situation is a little more complex (instead of a boolean return value, I have 3 possible return values), but I still think your idea is good. I think I can put the else ifs there. Thanks! –  Dmitri Shuralyov Nov 16 '12 at 5:10
    
I used stackoverflow.com/questions/3359954/c-convert-class-to-boolean to solve the problem of 3 return values... This allowed me to convert it into if (auto Result = MatchA()) {...} else if (auto Result = MatchB()) {...} else if (ExternalMatch(...)) {} else if (auto Result = MatchC()) {...} else {...}, which is an improvement I think. Thanks for pointing this out, cuz I completely missed it (while looking at my non-simplified code). –  Dmitri Shuralyov Nov 16 '12 at 6:31
    
@Yuushi: It's too bad you didn't make this an answer, I'd have marked it as accepted. –  Dmitri Shuralyov Nov 16 '12 at 6:40
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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you have access to C++11 I would like to suggest another solution. Basicaly I created a container of handlers and actions that can be adjusted in runtime. It may be a pro or con for your design depending on your requirements. Here it is:

#include <functional>

typedef std::pair<std::function<bool(const ElementType &)>,
                  std::function<void(ElementType &)> > HandlerData;
typedef std::vector<HandlerData> HandlerList;


HandlerList get_handlers()
{
  HandlerList handlers;
  handlers.emplace_back([](const ElementType &el){ return MatchesPatternA(el); },
                        [](ElementType &el){ /* Action */ });
  handlers.emplace_back([](const ElementType &el){ return MatchesPatternB(el); },
                        [](ElementType &el){ /* Action */ });
  handlers.emplace_back([](const ElementType &el){ return MatchesPatternC(el); },
                        [](ElementType &el){ /* Action */ });
  return handlers;
}


int main()
{
  auto handlers = get_handlers();
  while(!Queue.empty()) {
    auto &Element = *Queue.begin();

    for(auto &h : handlers) {
      // check if handler matches the element
      if(h.first(Element)) {
        // act on element
        h.second(Element);
        break;
      }
    }

    // remove element
    Queue.pop_front();
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this fleshed out answer. I think this is definitely the way to go in the long run (once my current if-else-if-else-if solution becomes unmaintainable, or I need to change matchers/actions at run-time). It's easy to extend this to support ExternalMatching(): just modify get_handlers() to call External_add_handlers() which populates the HandlerList with their handlers. The priority order is preserved. Thanks a lot! –  Dmitri Shuralyov Nov 16 '12 at 8:07
    
I'll mark this as accepted, even though it's not the solution that I used (for now), but because I think it's the best answer. –  Dmitri Shuralyov Nov 16 '12 at 8:16
    
Nice idea, but here it seems somewhat overkill. But very flexible if the "handlers" need to be changed at runtime. –  hirschhornsalz Nov 16 '12 at 8:53
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I would recommend using a function that does the pattern matching (but does not act on the result) and then a set of functions that act on the different options:

enum EventType {
   A, B, C //, D, ...
};

while (!queue.empty()) {
   auto & event = queue.front();
   EventType e = eventType(event); // Internally does MatchesPattern*
                                   // and returns the match
   switch (e) {
   case A:
      processA(event);
      break;
   case B:
      processB(event);

This way you clearly separate the matching from the processing, the loop is just a simple dispatcher

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, I have to think about this. Thanks! –  Dmitri Shuralyov Nov 16 '12 at 5:14
    
My one concern about this is that it might make it more verbose to add/change patterns and associated actions (i.e. have to add a new enum EventType value, etc.). If that's the case, I'd have to make sure it's worth it. But it might still be a good idea. –  Dmitri Shuralyov Nov 16 '12 at 5:22
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Consider an interface:

class IMatchPattern
{
public:
    virtual bool MatchesPattern(const Element& e) = 0;
};

Then you can organize a container of objects implementing IMatchPattern, to allow for iterative access to each pattern match method.

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1  
+1, but needs a virtual. Also I think you want to delete the B from the end of the method name. –  j_random_hacker Nov 16 '12 at 4:51
    
@j_random_hacker thanks! Edited my answer to reflect your suggestions. –  Michael Sh Nov 16 '12 at 4:56
1  
Yes, I think this is a good idea in the long run. I could have a std::vector<std::pair<IMatchPattern *, std::function<void()>>> or something. Basically pairs of pattern matchers and associated actions. Thank you. –  Dmitri Shuralyov Nov 16 '12 at 5:13
1  
@DmitriShuralyov: Yes, you could either do that (keep pattern matchers and actions separate), or add a PerformAction(const Element&) method to the IMatchPattern interface (if a particular pattern will only ever produce a particular action). –  j_random_hacker Nov 16 '12 at 5:29
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You can change your ExternalMatching to return bool, indicating that the processing has been done. This way the caller would be able to continue evaluating if necessary:

bool ExternalMatching(...)
{
    if (MatchesPatternB(Element) {
        // Act on it
        // Remove Element from queue
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

Now you can call it like this:

if (ExternalMatchin1(...)) continue;
if (ExternalMatchin2(...)) continue;
...
if (ExternalMatchingN(...)) continue;
share|improve this answer
    
Yep, I mentioned this as one potential solution, but I wanted to see if there were any other nicer ways to solve this task. Another solution (which I don't want to use) would be to replace continues with throws, which does work across functions, but using throw for logic doesn't seem like a good idea (should be reserved for rarely-occurring errors and such). Thanks. :) –  Dmitri Shuralyov Nov 16 '12 at 5:09
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Ok, I ended up rewriting the loop more akin to this.

Huge thanks and credit goes to Yuushi, dasblinkenlight, David Rodríguez for their help; this answer is based on a combination of their answers.

bool ExternalMatching(...)
{
    bool Match;

    if ((Match = MatchesPatternX(Element))) {
        // Act on it
    } else if ((Match = MatchesPatternY(Element))) {
        // Act on it
    }

    return Match;
}

while (!Queue.empty())
{
    auto & Element = Queue.front();

    if (MatchesPatternA(Element)) {    // Highest priority, since it's first
        // Act on it
    } else if (MatchesPatternB(Element)) {
        // Act on it
    } else if (ExternalMatching(...)) {
    } else if (MatchesPatternC(Element)) {    // Lowest priority, since it's last
        // Act on it
    }

    // Remove Element from queue
}

Now, I know there's further room for improvement, see answers of Mateusz Pusz and Michael Sh. However, this is good enough to answer my original question, and it'll do for now. I'll consider improving it in the future.

If you're curious to see the real code (non-simplified version), see here:

https://github.com/shurcooL/Conception/blob/38f731ccc199d5391f46d8fce3cf9a9092f38c65/src/App.cpp#L592

Thanks everyone again!

share|improve this answer
    
I just started to write an answer "Use a simple else if instead...", wondering why nobody else proposed it. Anyway, you have found it yourself. –  hirschhornsalz Nov 16 '12 at 8:51
    
BTW, I think there is nothing wrong with continue in itself, but most people seem to be more used to the else if idiom and are able to parse it faster and easier. You could still use ExternalMatching with continue. –  hirschhornsalz Nov 16 '12 at 8:57
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I would like to suggest a Factory function that would take the Element and create an appropriate handler and return the interface pointer to the handler.

while (!Queue.empty())
{
    auto & Element = *Queue.begin();
    // get the appropriate handler object pointer e.g.
    IPatternHandler *handler = Factory.GetHandler(Element);
    handler->handle();
    // clean up handler appropriately
}
share|improve this answer
    
Using an interface is going in the right direction, but you've just moved the question of how to select the right handler from the original loop into Factory.GetHandler(). I think Michael Sh nailed it. –  j_random_hacker Nov 16 '12 at 4:55
    
@j_random_hacker: The issue is with the 'continue' while handling the pattern. I just pushed the issue of instantiating the appropriate handler object into the factory. This seperates out the two concerns. creating the handler and using the handler –  Chubsdad Nov 16 '12 at 4:59
    
OK, but how will Factory.GetHandler() select the right handler? With a bunch of if ... elses? Might as well do that in-place, no? –  j_random_hacker Nov 16 '12 at 5:02
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