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I'm getting an array with fixed size of let's say 20.

I have to set each array element in a bean property, so my bean has 20 properties.

Here's my current approach:

Object[] record = { "0", "1", "2", ...."19" };

for (int j = 0; j < record.length; j++) {
    if (j == 0) {
        bean.setNo((String) record[j]);
    }
    if (j == 1) {
        bean.setName((String) record[j]);  
    }
    if (j == 2) {
        bean.setPhone((String) record[j]);  
    }
    // so on and so forth...
}

This is how i'm setting every property of bean from array.

Here i have 20 elements in array.

So to set 20th element it is checking 20 conditions.. Performance issue..

Any optimized technique is appreciated...

Thanks in advance...

share|improve this question
    
Is it actually a performance issue or do you just not like it? It seems unlikely that you're setting this so often that it actually matters how optimized it is. Don't optimize until you need to. –  Chris Hayes Nov 16 '12 at 5:51
    
Why are you using that loop (and all the condition checks) there? –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 16 '12 at 5:53
    
You shouldn't use a loop at all. You should just have 20 statements in a row that directly access to correct element in the array. –  jahroy Nov 16 '12 at 6:22
    
@jahroy what would be the reason for not to use switch case? Any problem with that? please explain... –  Mr.Chowdary Nov 16 '12 at 6:25
1  
The switch statement is the same as the code you've posted (if you changed your if statements to if else statements). Internally there will be no difference. Just because you can't see the if statements it doesn't mean the compiler isn't making the same amount of comparisons. Your code will make 400 comparisons (because you don't use an if else statement). The answer with the switch statement will make 200 comparisons (an average of 20 per item). The answer by @SashiKant will make zero comparisons and will perform 20 efficient operations. –  jahroy Nov 16 '12 at 6:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One way of doing this is :

Try this::

     Object[] record = BeanList.get(i);
     int j = 0;
     bean.setNo((String) record[j++]);
     bean.setName((String) record[j++]);  
     bean.setPhone((String) record[j++]);

.............. ................ .............

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for early response.. It is also pretty good.. –  Mr.Chowdary Nov 16 '12 at 6:20
1  
This is a far better answer than the one you selected. –  jahroy Nov 16 '12 at 6:23
    
@jahroy Thanks for correcting me.. –  Mr.Chowdary Nov 16 '12 at 6:28
    
@jahroy: Thanks jahroy :-) –  Sashi Kant Nov 16 '12 at 6:43

Another way of setting bean values. This requires commons-beanutils.jar as dependency.

import java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException;

import org.apache.commons.beanutils.BeanUtils;

public class BeanUtilsTest {

    // bean property names
    private static String[] propertyNames = { "name", "address" };

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IllegalAccessException,
            InvocationTargetException {
        // actual values u want to set
        String[] values = { "Sree", "India" };
        MyBean bean = new MyBean();
        System.out.println("Bean before Setting: " + bean);

        // code for setting values
        for (int i = 0; i < propertyNames.length; i++) {
            BeanUtils.setProperty(bean, propertyNames[i], values[i]);
        }
        // end code for setting values
        System.out.println("Bean after Setting: " + bean);
    }

    public static class MyBean {
        private String name;
        private String address;
        public String getName() {
            return name;
        }
        public void setName(String name) {
            this.name = name;
        }
        public String getAddress() {
            return address;
        }
        public void setAddress(String address) {
            this.address = address;
        }
        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "MyBean [address=" + address + ", name=" + name + "]";
        }


    }
}
share|improve this answer

U can use Switch instead of these if statements

for( int j =0; j < record.length; j++) {
     switch (j){
           case 1 :  bean.setNo((String) record[j]);break;
           case 2 :  bean.setNo((String) record[j]);break;
           ....
           ....
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks.. I didn't really get this idea to use switch.. it is really awesome... –  Mr.Chowdary Nov 16 '12 at 5:56
    
can u pls accept the answer if you found it useful –  sheldonCooper Nov 16 '12 at 5:58
    
I will.. But atleast i must wait 5 to 10 minutes to accept the answer.. so i'm waiting.. –  Mr.Chowdary Nov 16 '12 at 6:01
    
I think loop and the if conditions are meaningless in this requirement.. –  Sashi Kant Nov 16 '12 at 6:04
1  
This does not improve performance in any way. It is basically the same code written differently. The answer by @SashiKant is far superior. –  jahroy Nov 16 '12 at 6:20

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