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I have a database with an "ID" column. Whenever there is a new entry for the database, I fetch the last ID from the database, increment the value, and then use it in the Insert statement.

EDIT : I need the ID to use in multiple Insert statements. I will fetch this ID from the primary table and use this ID to insert values into related tables.

    NextID = Select Max(ID) + 1 From Table

    INSERT INTO Table1(ID, Col1, Col2...) Values(NextId, Value1, Value2...)

    INSERT INTO Table2 (ID,col1,col2....) Values (NextID, Value1, Value2...)

I dont know if this is a good way because I know there will be concurrency issues. When my application tries to read the NextID, there is a chance that another instance of the application is also trying to read the same value and thus concurrency issues may arise.

Is there a proper way to deal with this situation? I mean there are ways to set the database isolation level. Which would be a proper Isolation level for this situation.

Also if anybody could suggest me with an alternate way to maintain and increment manually the ID in the database, I'm also open to that.

If this information is not enough, please let me know what you require.

I am working with ASP.Net with VB and MS Sql Server 2008. I do not want to use the built-in "Identity" of SQL Server.

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1  
do it in a single statement.... –  Mitch Wheat Nov 16 '12 at 6:28
    
@MitchWheat What do you mean by single statement?? I also have the same problem...kindly suggest. –  Monodeep Nov 16 '12 at 6:35
    
@MitchWheat yes that is an option, but I need that ID in multiple insert statements. I will read the nextID from the primary table and use that ID to insert into other related tables. –  Nitish Nov 16 '12 at 6:35
1  
I know you don't want to use identity but that really is the solution to your problem. If you could explain the issues you have with identity perhaps someone can have a suggestion on how to solve that instead. –  Mikael Eriksson Nov 16 '12 at 6:37
    
@MikaelEriksson Yes actually the problem with Identity is that the ID in my problem is editable (not by the user, some other logic), which cannot be done if i use Identity. I know, allowing the ID to be modified is not wise, but i need that logic. –  Nitish Nov 16 '12 at 6:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The only way to get the next ID is to actually insert the row, and use identity. Everything else will fail. So you must start by inserting into the parent table:

begin transaction;
insert into Table (col1, col2, col3) values (value1, value2, value3);
set @Id = scope_identity();
insert into Table1(ID, col1, col2) values (@Id, ...);
insert into Table3(ID, col1, col2) values (@Id, ...);
commit;

This is atomic and concurrency safe.

I do not want to use the built-in "Identity" of SQL Server.

tl;dr. What you 'want' matter little unless you can make a clear justification why. You can do it correctly, or you can spend the time 'ill oblivion reinventing the wheel.

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Yes actually the problem with Identity is that the ID in my problem is editable (not by the user, some other logic), which cannot be done if i use Identity. I know, allowing the ID to be modified is not wise, but i need that logic. –  Nitish Nov 16 '12 at 11:55
1  
Use an immutable identity as the primary key. Use a different property as the 'logic ID'. Edit your mutable logical ID ad nauseam, but don't touch the primary key immutable identity. –  Remus Rusanu Nov 16 '12 at 12:04
    
i'm sorry but i am getting a bit confused, which one - the "identity" or the "logic ID" should i use as my ID column. Please bear with me –  Nitish Nov 16 '12 at 12:26
    
ID will be the identity. Never display the ID to the user, never use it in you logic which changes 'logical ID'. The 'Logical ID' (can get by default the ID value at record insert time) is the one displayed and manipulated when you 'must change ID'. –  Remus Rusanu Nov 16 '12 at 12:50
    
In other words, use a surrogate key for for primary key physical ID. –  Remus Rusanu Nov 16 '12 at 12:52

Esentially you have a batch of three SQL statements - one select and two inserts. The database engine can execute another statement from a different session anywhere between them, thus breaking your data consistency - some other session can get the same MAX() value that you've got and use it for other insert statements. The only way to prevent DB engine from doing it is to use transactions. Wrap your batch with BEGIN TRANSACTION ... COMMIT and you are done.

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Your way of doing this fine, what you would need is transaction handling..

BEGIN TRANSACTION 

begin try
    NextID = Select Max(ID) + 1 From Table

    INSERT INTO Table1(ID, Col1, Col2...) Values(NextId, Value1, Value2...)

    INSERT INTO Table2 (ID,col1,col2....) Values (NextID, Value1, Value2...)

    COMMIT TRANSACTION 
end try

begin catch

    ROLLBACK TRANSACTION 
    --exception logging goes here

end catch
share|improve this answer
    
what will happen in case of concurrent access? I mean suppose I am fetching the nextID with a transaction. Now will it lock the ID column? If the previous Committed ID is say 5, the first request will get 5+1=6 but before this transaction is committed, Suppose at the very next milisecond another request comes to read the value of Max(ID), which value will it return.. the last committed 5 + 1=6 or 6+1=7 ? I hope I did not confuse you :P –  Nitish Nov 16 '12 at 7:46
    
will only work if in a serializable isolation level transaction ........ –  Mitch Wheat Nov 16 '12 at 9:05
    
will this have any performance issues associated? i mean if there are a lot of requests, will the isolation by any chance slow down the system ? –  Nitish Nov 16 '12 at 12:00
    
It should not, unless your actual inserts are fast i.e. table1 and table2 do not have many indexes which can make the inserts slow. And the ID column in parent "table" is indexed. –  patil.rahulk Nov 16 '12 at 12:48

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