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Assume you have a data set as something like a CSV file that contains mildly sensitive information, like who passed a note to whom in a 12 Grade English class. While it's not a crisis if this data got out, it would be nice to strip out the identifying information so the data could be made public, shared with collaborators, etc. The data looks something like this:

Giver, Recipient:

Anna,Joe
Anna,Mark
Mark,Mindy
Mindy,Joe

How would you process through this list, assign each name a unique but arbitrary identifier, then strip out the names and replace them with said identifier in Python such that you end up with something like:

1,2
1,3
3,4
4,2

share|improve this question
    
does the unique identifier have to be 1,2,3 only? –  Ashwini Chaudhary Nov 16 '12 at 7:39
    
@AshwiniChaudhary No - any sort of identifier would work. –  Fomite Nov 16 '12 at 8:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

you can use hash() to generate a unique arbitrary identifier, it will return always return same integer for a particular string:

 with open("data1.txt") as f:
    lis=[x.split(",") for x in f]
    items=[map(lambda y:hash(y.strip()),x) for x in lis]
    for x in items:
        print ",".join(map(str,x))
   ....:         


-1319295970,1155173045
-1319295970,-1963774321
-1963774321,-1499251772
-1499251772,1155173045

or you can also use iterools.count:

In [80]: c=count(1)

In [81]: with open("data1.txt") as f:
    lis=[map(str.strip,x.split(",")) for x in f]
    dic={}
    for x in set(chain(*lis)):
        dic.setdefault(x.strip(),next(c))
    for x in lis:    
        print ",".join(str(dic[y.strip()]) for y in x)
   ....:         
3,2
3,4
4,1
1,2

or improving my previous answer using the unique_everseen recipe from itertools, you can get the exact answer :

In [84]: c=count(1)

In [85]: def unique_everseen(iterable, key=None):
        seen = set()
        seen_add = seen.add
        if key is None:
                for element in ifilterfalse(seen.__contains__, iterable):
                        seen_add(element)
                        yield element
                else:
                        for element in iterable:
                                k = key(element)
                                if k not in seen:
                                        seen_add(k)
                                        yield element
   ....:                         

In [86]: with open("data1.txt") as f:
    lis=[map(str.strip,x.split(",")) for x in f]
    dic={}
    for x in unique_everseen(chain(*lis)):
        dic.setdefault(x.strip(),next(c))
    for x in lis:    
        print ",".join(str(dic[y.strip()]) for y in x)
   ....:         
1,2
1,3
3,4
4,2
share|improve this answer
    
Accepting this answer for thoroughness...though hashing will probably work swimmingly, and I'm not sure why I didn't think of it. –  Fomite Nov 16 '12 at 8:36

You could use hash to get a unique ID for each name of you could use a dictionary mapping names to their values (if you want numbers to be as in your example):

data = [("Anna", "Joe"), ("Anna", "Mark"), ("Mark", "Mindy"), ("Mindy", "Joe")]

names = {}
def anon(name):
    if not name in names:
        names[name] = len(names) + 1
    return names[name]

result = []

for n1, n2 in data:
    result.append((anon(n1), anon(n2)))

print names
print result

Will give when run:

{'Mindy': 4, 'Joe': 2, 'Anna': 1, 'Mark': 3}
[(1, 2), (1, 3), (3, 4), (4, 2)]
share|improve this answer
names = """
Anna,Joe
Anna,Mark
Mark,Mindy
Mindy,Joe
"""

nameset = set((",".join(names.strip().splitlines())).split(","))

for i,name in enumerate(nameset):
    names = names.replace(name,str(i))

print names

2,1
2,3
3,0
0,1
share|improve this answer

First, read your file into a list of rows:

import csv
with open('myFile.csv') as f:
    rows = [row for row in csv.reader(f)]

At this point, you could build a dict to hold the mapping:

nameSet = set()
for row in rows:
    for name in row:
        nameSet.add(name)
map = dict((name, i) for i, name in enumerate(nameSet))

Alternatively, you could build the dict directly:

nextID = 0
map = {}
for row in rows:
    for name in row:
        if name not in map:
            map[name] = nextID
            nextID += 1

Either way, you go through the rows again and apply the mapping:

output = [[map[name] for name in row] for row in rows]
share|improve this answer

To genuinely anonymize the data, you need random aliases for the names. Hashes are good for that, but if you just want to map each name to an integer, you could do something like this:

from random import shuffle

data = [("Anna", "Joe"), ("Anna", "Mark"), ("Mark", "Mindy"), ("Mindy", "Joe")]
names = list(set(x for pair in data for x in pair))
shuffle(names)
aliases = dict((k, v) for v, k in enumerate(names))

munged = [(aliases[a], aliases[b]) for a, b in data] 

That'll give you something like:

>>> data
[('Anna', 'Joe'), ('Anna', 'Mark'), ('Mark', 'Mindy'), ('Mindy', 'Joe')]
>>> names
['Mindy', 'Joe', 'Anna', 'Mark']
>>> aliases
{'Mindy': 0, 'Joe': 1, 'Anna': 2, 'Mark': 3}
>>> munged
[(2, 1), (2, 3), (3, 0), (0, 1)]

You can then (if you need to) get the name from the alias, and vice versa:

>>> aliases["Joe"]
1
>>> names[2]
'Anna'
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