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I have often SQL statements of the kind

SELECT LENGTH(col_name) FROM `table` WHERE *condition*

to establish the size of the contents of a specific column in a given row of a mySQL table. However, it is not clear to me that there is a single SQL statement that would fetch the sum of the content lengths of ALL the columns in a given row. I should add that all the columns in question are VARCHARS.

Yes, I know I could do this by fetching the entire row as

SELECT * FROM `table` WHERE *condition*

collapsing the resulting row contents into a string and getting the length of that string but I was wondering if there isn't a more efficient one liner to do the job. Any tips would be much appreciated.

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can you give specific example? –  John Woo Nov 16 '12 at 7:56
    
Well, it is quite simple actually. For example, I have a table in which I store information that gets showed in an HTML "news ticker". The table has four columns - ticker "story" text, ticker story author and ticker story location and finally a ticker story id. From time to time I have clean up code that discards an old story by its id. When I do I need to get the lengths of the story text, story author and story location fields for that id. I can do that but all in a single SQL statement via LENGTH or the like would be nice. –  DroidOS Nov 16 '12 at 8:00
    
is this what you want? SELECT CHAR_LENGTH(CONCAT(col1,col2,col3)) FROM tableName WHERE... –  John Woo Nov 16 '12 at 8:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, I prefer to use CHAR_LENGTH over LENGTH

SELECT CHAR_LENGTH(CONCAT(col1,col2,col3)) 
FROM tableName 
WHERE...
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1  
Perfect! Thanks a lot. CHAR_LEGNTH vs LENGTH is irrelevant in my case since all my data are base64 encoded. –  DroidOS Nov 16 '12 at 8:09

Have you tried:

SELECT char_length(col_name)+char_length(col_name2) FROM table WHERE condition

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Thanks, that would work too but the version with CONCAT is more elegant. Pity CONCAT does not accept * though :-/ –  DroidOS Nov 16 '12 at 8:13

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