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How would get find an average from an array?

If I have the array:

[0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6]

Averaging would give me 3.375.

Thanks!

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6  
If you're getting 21.75 as the average of those numbers, something's very wrong... –  ceejayoz Aug 27 '09 at 14:06
1  
dotty, not sure how you got 21.75 but the average/mean for that set of data is 3.375 and the sum is 27. i'm not sure what sort of aggregation function would yield 21.75. Please double check and make sure that average is really what you're after! –  Paul Sasik Aug 27 '09 at 14:07
    
I have NO idea where i got 21.75 from. Must had press something like 0+48+2+5+0+2+6 on the calculator! –  dotty Aug 27 '09 at 14:19
11  
Since this is also tagged ruby-on-rails, active record calculations are worth looking into if you are averaging an ActiveRecord array. Person.average(:age, :country => 'Brazil') returns the average age of people from Brazil. Pretty cool! –  Kyle Heironimus Oct 27 '10 at 17:35
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12 Answers 12

up vote 126 down vote accepted

Try this:

arr = [5, 6, 7, 8]
arr.inject{ |sum, el| sum + el }.to_f / arr.size
=> 6.5

Note the .to_f, which you'll want for avoiding any problems from integer division. You can also do:

arr = [5, 6, 7, 8]
arr.inject(0.0) { |sum, el| sum + el } / arr.size
=> 6.5

You can define it as part of Array as another commenter has suggested, but you need to avoid integer division or your results will be wrong. Also, this isn't generally applicable to every possible element type (obviously, an average only makes sense for things that can be averaged). But if you want to go that route, use this:

  class Array
    def sum
      inject(0.0) { |result, el| result + el }
    end

    def mean 
      sum / size
    end
  end

If you haven't seen inject before, it's not as magical as it might appear. It iterates over each element and then applies an accumulator value to it. The accumulator is then handed to the next element. In this case, our accumulator is simply an integer that reflects the sum of all the previous elements.

Edit: Commenter Dave Ray proposed a nice improvement.

Edit: Commenter Glenn Jackman's proposal, using arr.inject(:+).to_f, is nice too but perhaps a bit too clever if you don't know what's going on. The :+ is a symbol; when passed to inject, it applies the method named by the symbol (in this case, the addition operation) to each element against the accumulator value.

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4  
You can eliminate to_f and ? operator by passing an initial value to inject: arr.inject(0.0) { |sum,el| sum + el } / arr.size. –  Dave Ray Aug 27 '09 at 14:37
52  
Or: arr.inject(:+).to_f / arr.size # => 3.375 –  glenn jackman Aug 27 '09 at 15:11
1  
I don't think this warrants adding to the Array class, since it's not generalizable to all the types that Arrays can contain. –  Sarah Mei Aug 27 '09 at 17:12
7  
@John: That's not exactly Symbol#to_proc conversion — it's part of the inject interface, mentioned in the documentation. The to_proc operator is &. –  Chuck Aug 27 '09 at 18:53
1  
If you're using Rails, Array#inject is overkill here. Just use #sum. E.g. arr.sum.to_f / arr.size –  nickh Jul 31 '13 at 19:24
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a = [0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6]
a.instance_eval { reduce(:+) / size.to_f } #=> 3.375
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Hi, Corban. I'm looking for some documentation on ":+". Does that fit into a "class" of symbols that a function, like reduce, can use? Thank you. –  Zachary Young Jul 26 '11 at 2:16
    
This one could be considered too clever, but very useful when you're inside of the console session and don't want to be extending Array class or storing Array in separate variable, so +1 definitely! –  dolzenko Oct 3 '11 at 8:57
1  
I don't think it is too clever. I think it solves the problem idiomatically. I.e., it uses reduce, which is exactly correct. Programmers should be encouraged to understand what is correct, why it is correct, and then propagate. For a trivial operation like average, true, one doesn't need to be "clever". But by understanding what "reduce" is for a trivial case, one can then start applying it to much more complex problems. upvote. –  pduey Feb 7 '12 at 17:50
1  
why the need for instance_eval here? –  tybro0103 May 9 '12 at 16:13
3  
instance_eval lets you run the code while only specifying a once, so it can be chained with other commands. I.e. random_average = Array.new(10) { rand(10) }.instance_eval { reduce(:+) / size.to_f } instead of random = Array.new(10) { rand(10) }; random_average = random.reduce(:+) / random.size –  Benjamin Manns Jul 10 '12 at 17:56
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I believe the simplest answer is

list.reduce(:+).to_f / list.size
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It took me a moment to find it -- reduce is a method of the Enumerable mixin used by Array. And despite its name, I agree with the @ShuWu ... unless you're using Rails which implements sum. –  Tom Harrison Jr Aug 31 '13 at 23:21
2  
This is my pick, simple, readable, and pure Ruby –  SamStephens Dec 10 '13 at 19:39
    
nice and simple, I like it –  Kirk Dec 11 '13 at 0:55
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I was hoping for Math.average(values), but no such luck.

values = [0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6]
average = values.sum / values.size.to_f

edit: formatting

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4  
I think this might be a Rails Extension, so not a general ruby case answer. Still gave you an upvote anyway. –  taelor Jun 28 '11 at 18:19
    
I didn't realize #sum was added by Rails! Thanks for pointing that out. –  Denny Abraham Jul 26 '11 at 11:29
    
My choice to solve the average from array problem –  David Mauricio Jul 19 '12 at 5:19
    
Finally, someone who can write code. WTF are the other answers in here thinking? Inject is hideous, :+ would get you fired at any respectable job, and don't even get me started on instance_eval –  Kevin Mar 22 at 20:48
    
I disagree. There is nothing wrong with #inject, #reduce and #+ - #instance_eval is a powerful tool, but I wouldn't use it in this particular case. –  EinLama Mar 26 at 12:09
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Why not just:

list.sum.to_f / list.size

It's more readable and easier to write.

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6  
Array#sum is only available in Rails. –  Derek Dahmer Apr 23 '13 at 16:06
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For public amusement, yet another solution:

a = 0, 4, 8, 2, 5, 0, 2, 6
a.reduce [ 0.0, 0 ] do |(s, c), e| [ s + e, c + 1 ] end.reduce :/
#=> 3.375
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1  
This is neat, I like it. :-) –  hurikhan77 May 21 at 12:00
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a = [0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6]
sum = 0
a.each { |b| sum += b }
average = sum / a.length
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3  
This will return incorrect values because of integer division. For example, if a is [2, 3], the expected result is 2.5, but you'll return 2. –  John Feminella Aug 27 '09 at 14:03
    
Thanks, that's why I voted your answer up –  erik Aug 27 '09 at 14:04
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Don't have ruby on this pc, but something to this extent should work:

values = [0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6]
total = 0.0
values.each do |val|
 total += val
end

average = total/values.size
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class Array
  def sum 
    inject( nil ) { |sum,x| sum ? sum+x : x }
  end

  def mean 
    sum.to_f / size.to_f
  end
end

[0,4,8,2,5,0,2,6].mean
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2  
This returns incorrect values because of integer division. Try it with, for example, [2,3].mean, which returns 2 instead of 2.5. –  John Feminella Aug 27 '09 at 14:06
1  
Needs more floatyness. –  Andy Gaskell Aug 27 '09 at 14:08
1  
Why should an empty array have a sum of nil rather than 0? –  Andrew Grimm May 23 '11 at 11:59
1  
Because you can get the difference between [] and [0]. And I think everybody who want a real mean can make use of to_i or replace the above nil with an 0 –  astropanic May 23 '11 at 12:58
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[1,2].tap { |a| @asize = a.size }.inject(:+).to_f/@asize

Short but using instance variable

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1  
I'd do a_size = nil; [1,2].tap { |a| a_size = a.size }.inject(:+).to_f/a_size rather than create an instance variable. –  Andrew Grimm Aug 1 '11 at 23:50
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what I don't like about the accepted solution

arr = [5, 6, 7, 8]
arr.inject{ |sum, el| sum + el }.to_f / arr.size
=> 6.5

is that it does not really work in a purely funcitonal way. we need a variable arr to comput arr.size at the end.

to solve this purely functionally we need to keep track of two values: the sum of all elements, and the number of elements.

[5, 6, 7, 8].inject([0.0,0]) do |r,ele|
    [ r[0]+ele, r[1]+1 ]
end.inject(:/)
=> 6.5   

if you want to see how it works, add some puts:

[5, 6, 7, 8].inject([0.0,0]) do |r,ele|
    r2 = [ r[0]+ele, r[1]+1 ]
    puts "adding #{ele} gives #{r2}"
    r2
end.inject(:/)
adding 5 gives [5.0, 1]
adding 6 gives [11.0, 2]
adding 7 gives [18.0, 3]
adding 8 gives [26.0, 4]
=> 6.5

It is a bit more readable if you use a struct instead of an array to contain the sum and the count, but then you have to declare the struct first:

R=Struct.new(:sum, :count)
[5, 6, 7, 8].inject( R.new(0.0, 0) ) do |r,ele|
    r.sum+=ele
    r.count+=1
    r
end.inject(:/)
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Let me bring something into competition which solves the division by zero problem:

a = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]
a.reduce(:+).try(:to_f).try(:/,a.size) #==> 4.5

a = []
a.reduce(:+).try(:to_f).try(:/,a.size) #==> nil

I must admit, however, that "try" is a Rails helper. But you can easily solve this:

class Object;def try(*options);self&&send(*options);end;end
class Array;def avg;reduce(:+).try(:to_f).try(:/,size);end;end

BTW: I think it is correct that the average of an empty list is nil. The average of nothing is nothing, not 0. So that is expected behavior. However, if you change to:

class Array;def avg;reduce(0.0,:+).try(:/,size);end;end

the result for empty Arrays won't be an exception as I had expected but instead it returns NaN... I've never seen that before in Ruby. ;-) Seems to be a special behavior of the Float class...

0.0/0 #==> NaN
0.1/0 #==> Infinity
0.0.class #==> Float
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