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I have 2 tables. One table contains a person's name and that person's unique ID. The other table has multiple columns, but there is one column in particular that stores the person's unique ID.

Until now, the 2nd table has always stored a single ID, so I was able to easily perform JOINs on these two tables and get the data I needed like so:

SELECT DISTINCT personTable._id, personTable.name FROM dataTable LEFT OUTER JOIN personTable ON dataTable.person_id = personTable._id

However, a new requirement came into play that now will allow the 2nd table to reference more than one ID in the same column. In other words, the table used to be strictly like this:

2ND TABLE COLUMN PERSON'S ID = 5

But now the storage can be like this

2ND TABLE COLUMN PERSON'S ID = 5-6
2ND TABLE COLUMN PERSON'S ID = 5-3-8-2
2ND TABLE COLUMN PERSON'S ID = 5 (still valid)

With this new format, I can not query data successfully each time. How can I update this query to work properly? I am using SQLite in Android. Thanks for any help.

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Why didn't you object when they were messing up with your table integrity? ;) Is there any table which carries Persons data only? (e.g. Person parent table) According to the new structure, your dataTable's person's ID must have been updated too right? –  bonCodigo Nov 16 '12 at 8:19
    
Believe me, I did not like the changes! The PERSON table is composed of person data only. The dataTable's person ID was not going to be changed, it was simply going to have it's data expanded. When the dataTable was created, the dataTable's person ID column was set as TEXT. So, when a new row is added, instead of just adding a single person ID, the new requirement says that the dataTable can have multiple PERSONs associated with a row, so they wanted to just throw a dash (i.e. "-") in between each person ID. –  Michael Nov 19 '12 at 8:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You will not get far if you use new format.

To serve new spec, you should change your schema to have one more table which will serve as join table.

In total, you will have 3 tables, something like this:

CREATE TABLE persontable (
    person_id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
    name VARCHAR(32),
    -- more person fields...
)

CREATE TABLE datatable (
    data_id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
    join_id INTEGER,
    -- more datatable fields...
)

CREATE TABLE jointable (
    join_id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
    person_id INTEGER
)

Jointable will have as many rows per user as you need, for example for

2ND TABLE COLUMN PERSON'S ID = 5-3-8-2

it will have 4 rows.

Now, you can have your data as follows:

SELECT d.*,
    p.name,
    ...
FROM datatable d
    JOIN persons p USING (person_id)
    JOIN jointable j USING (join_id)
WHERE d.some_field = 'blah'
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks mvp! I can't set things up exactly as you proposed, but your answer helped me to understand a better way to approach this. But my implementation will be similar to what you have above. Thanks again! –  Michael Nov 19 '12 at 8:13

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